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January 14, 1965 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-14

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11

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, 14 JANUARY 196

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TLIIJRSDAY.. 14 JANITARY 1~R!~

iw V./ ' +fa.a i Vaa1 V411LV1 1~V l

..,

Diligence Helps Make Cazzie AllAmerican Hawks Leai
-U-T , _- m -1

Fs Draw*

U

By LLOYD GRAFF
Were it not for some friendly,
basketball loving janitors Cazzie
Lee Russell Jr. might be working
in the sweltering heat of steel
mills, driving a cab, pounding riv-
ets for a construction gang, or do-
ing some other kind of blue collar
work that most of the Negroes of
Chicago's South Side usually find
themselves when they get out of
high school.
"When I was just a freshman in
high school I used to sneak into
the- gym at night to practice bas-
ketball. I made friends with some
of the janitors and they used to
let me come in and stay late.
That's where I learned the funda-
mentals of the game. If it wasn't

to one of the forward spots. At important persuaders in bringing
6' 5"2" he had the size for the all- Cazzie to Ann Arbor.
around basketball player. Why He Came
Value of Coaching Russell, however, says his deci-
Cazzie not only had ability sion was based on several factors:

tast T kes INBIA 'lilt

working for him, he had excellent "First of all the coaches and alum-
coaching, something rare in Chi- ni I talked to told me that Michi-
cago's Public League. Larry Haw- gan was hot. I was told I'd find
kins, a young Negro coach, taught the water hot here academically
his players the basics of basket- and that it would be up to me to
ball. He drilled and disciplined get used to that water and stay
them and made them play con- afloat. They didn't talk to me
trolled, defensive, basketball in like I was only a basketball play-
dramatic contrast to the wild hel- er. Second, Michigan was rebuild-
ter-skelter run-and-shoot brand of ing and I knew I would have a
ball which was rampant in the chance to play. Cincinnati had so
Public League. many good players, I was frankly
Hawkins had one great player afraid I might be just another
before Cazzie came along, Darius ballplayer. I guess that must
Cunningham. Cunningham at 6' sound pretty silly now. Third, the
was a dazzling passer and play- alumni talked to me in Chicago
maker and a splendid shooter. In and convinced me that the oppor-
one game he scored 90 points for tunities after I got out of school
Carver, breaking a Chicago rec- would be greater with a degree
ord. Cunningham went to Illinois, from Michigan."
the year Russell became a senior, So Cazzie came to Michigan. He
but he pulled out of school before knew he was in for trouble aca-
his freshman year was over. demically, coming from Carver
This was one of the things which sends very few students to
which turned Cazzie against the college. Through his own efforts,
Fighting Illini when it came time and with the help of tutors to
for him to sift scholarship offers which h readily admits, he made
from more than 50 colleges. He the grade and is now pointing to-
suspects Cunningham was mis- ward a Master's degree in educa-
treated racially at Champaign. tion.

r
,

By The Associated Press
TORONTO - First-place Chi-
cago and Toronto battled to a
0-0 tie last night in the first
scoreless deadlock in the Nation-
al Hockey League since Boston
and Montreal played one over a
year ago.
The tie increased the Black
Hawks' margin to two points over
Pep Rally
There will be a pep rally to-
night at 7 p.m. on the Diag to
express the students' apprecia-
tion to the Rose Bowl champion
Michigan football team. Vice-
President for Academic Affairs
Roger W. Heyns will give a
speech and the football team
will be present.

East Wins
ST. LOUIS-The East all but
blew a 20-point lead in the last
half but hung on for a 124-123
victory last night in the 15th an-
nual National Basketball Associa-
tion All-Star game.
Oscar Robertson's two free
throws with 1:15 remaining gave
the East its decisive points for a
124-117 lead that the West could
not close.
Jerry Lucas of Cincinnati, who
scored 25 points, was named most
valuable player in the game by a
vote of the sports writers.
Robertson led all scorers with
28 points and the West's Gus
Johnson of Baltimore matched Lu-
cas' total of 25.

the Montreal Canadiens, who were
idle. The Maple Leafs, in third
place, moved to within three points
of the Canadiens and two points
ahead of fourth-place Detroit,
which also didn't play.
The game was such a defensive
battle that the goalies made a;
total of only 39 saves. Chicago's
Denis DeJordy stopped 20 shots, a
meager two in the first period.

SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Marquette 59, Wisconsin 58
N.C. State 65, North Carolina 62
St. Joseph's 115, Seton Hall 81
Drake 76, Creighton 67
Syracuse 91, Colgate 52
Miami (Fla) 124, Florida Southern 93
Miami (Ohio) 58, Ohio U. 48
Chicago U, Toronto U (tie)
NBA
All-Star Game
East 124, West 123

CAZZIE RUSSELL

for them, who knows what I'd be
doing now," Cazzie remarked idly.
Cazzie Russell plays his chosen
sport without restraint, but he
guards his words with care when
reporters are around. It's not that
he's silent, actually, he quite gre-
garious, but he has polished the
technique of telling reporters
enough to appease them but not
enough to please them.
...Makes Perfect
He's developed the technique
through practice, the same way
he got his magnificent basketball
iskill, because Cazzie has been
trailed by people trying to expose
his insides to the voracious eyes
of the public since he was a sen-
ior in high school. Since then he's
been on top of the basketball
heap wherever he has gone.
When he was a senior at Carver
High, he was acknowledged the
best prep player in Chicago and
Illinois. He used to do everything
but sell popcorn and sweep the
floor at the games. He would bring
the ball down court, then move
into the pivot, and finally cut out

A Metamorphosis
The first time Chicago peo
heard of Cazzie Russell was wh
he led his team to the Chica
Frosh-Soph championship f
years ago. There was a picture
him in The Chicago Tribune figl
ing for a rebound. He was a gaw
6' 4" then, about 180 pounds.
was wearing ugly black high t
gym shoes and his socks h
slipped under the shoe tops E
posing thin legs tapering to skin
ankles.
What a different impression
presents now, always impeccal
dressed on the court or off.I
worldliness stands out whether
is fielding questions from a
porter or acting as master of ce
monies for a pep rally.
Inundated with Offers
By his senior year the sco
and bird dogs from just ab
every basketball conscious sch
north of the Mason-Dixon h
discovered him, including Mic
gan. He went through the sa
ritual of visiting schools and ta
ing to coaches that every hi
school phenom undergoes in t
competitive war of basketballi
cruiting.
It finally "came down to Mic:
gan, Cincinnati, and a couple o1
er Big Ten schools."
Coach Dave Strack credits B
Buntin as being one of the m

ple
yen
ago
ive
of
ht-
vky
He
top
lad
ex-
ny
he
bly
ri;

Not a Shopper
Michigan didn't get Cazzie be-
cause it gave him a better deal
financially. As assistant coach Tom
Jorgensen said when Russell was
a freshman, "if Cazzie was a shop-
per (looking for the best financial
offer) we wouldn't have had a
chance for him."
When Cazzie Russell came to
Ann Arbor, Michigan's traditional
pattern of losing basketball teams
flip-flopped. Michigan, "the cage
pushover," became "mighty Mich-
igan' overnight in newspapers all
around the country. The Russell-
bimfr tnm inn~n bomP the

I

-Daily-Jim Litres
ALL AMERICAN CAZZIE RUSSELL hits for two against Illinois in last Saturday's 89-83 Michigan
win in the Big Ten opener. Cazzie shared scoring honors in the game with Bill Buntin as each
netted 30 points. Cazzie, a junior from Chicago, is among the nation's leading scorers with better
than 26 a game this year and broke the Michigan record last year while leading the team in as-
sists and placing third in rebounding.

CAMPUS MAST'SS

619 E. LIBERTY

NO 2-0266

He also mastered the free throw.
Last season he shot better than
85' from the line and was in the
top five of the nation in percent-
age.

tis Buntin comnlna lon ecani e
u~ia.DLLIUU t.~iILJ1Id.U~iiThe story is told of some alum-
he most terrifying duo since Scylla ni whowereitokdngfasmeralu-
re- and Chyribdus. Buntin broke John wh ere taking a summer tour
re- Tidwell's old scoring records 2oearympningating outsid-h
years ago, and Cazzie came back early morning at the Sports Build-
and broke Buntin's mark last year. ing Tre thws. azzie soot-
uts Kinpi asSohomreing free throws. About four
out Cazzie set a new season scoring o'clock they trekked back to the
ool recazrdeasa snewomosesotchringSports Building to look it over
ool record as a sophomore, notching and there was Cazzie still shooting
lad 670 points for a 24.8 average. He free throws.
hi- led the team in assists and was.
me the third leading rebounder. Defensive Weakness
Ik- In college, as in high school, But if Cazzie's shooting is about
gh Cazzie had to practice and prac- as good as anybody's in college
the tice and practice to become the basketball (26 point average and
re- best. When he came to Michigan 50 per cent from the field would
his shooting was not outstanding. indicate it is) his defense still
hi- "Between my freshman and soph- lacks the polish of the rest of his
th- omore years I improved my shoot- game. Cazzie realizes this as does
ing because I learned to jump Strack. The coach thinks that
Bill higher. Now it's probably the best people pick on his defense which
ost part of my game." he calls "adequate but not -great,"

because it's the only minor flaw in
an almost perfect ballplayer.
Other observers have not been
so kind. A former Michigan play-
er said last summer that the Wol-
verines "play a four man, man-
to-man defense and Cazzie plays a
zone."
Russell says that if he's going
to play pro basketball, "I'll have
to improve my defense to make it."
Strack disagrees slightly. When
asked if he thinks Cazzie could
make the pros at this time he
blurted out, "Hell, yes, he could be
a fine pro ballplayer right now."
Looks Toward Airwaves
But Cazzie is figuring further
ahead than Saturday's game or
even the NBA. He wants to go into
broadcasting. He's getting practice
with a ten minute sports broadcast
on WCBN and also acts as public
address man for Michigan base-
ball games.
He is hoping his basketball fame
will open up the new career for
him.
I And it all might have been a
dream, a mirage, for one Cazzie
Lee Russell Jr. if the janitors had
been unfriendly.

WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
Hours
MON .-SAT.
from 8:30-5:30
TO BETTER
SERVE YOU
U-M Barbers
near Kresge's
and
Dascola Barber
near Michigan Theater

SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
DISCONTINUED STYLES
of
HulSh PIpiO
BREATHIN' BRUSHED PIGSKIN CASUAL SHOES
BY WOLVERINE
CAM~PUS M AST' SHP

TWO AWAY MEETS:

619 E. LIBERTY
OPEN FRIDAY NITES

NO 2-0266

Matmen Seek To Augment Win Streak

I

1

: ;
::.;:;.;,..,:.r;,.
r

I

By SCOTT BLECH
Coach Cliff Keen will be aiming
for his 25th and 26th consecutive
wrestling dual meet victories as
his grapplers visit Illinois Friday
and Purdue Saturday.
The defending Big Ten cham-
pions will be relatively healthy
for the first time since the begin-
ning of the season. Bill Johanne-
sen, Lee Deitrick and Chris Stow-
ell will be in the Michigan lineup
after recovering from leg injur-
ies.
Only Captain Rick Bay is still
on the injury list but he will begin
working out by next Monday. The
Wolverine senior suffered a serious
knee injury on the eastern trip
between semesters.
Johannesen, who won a 7-5 vic-
tory with a sprained ankle against
Cornell, will return to the 137-
pound class.
Deitrick Returns
* Deitrick was victorious in the
season opener against Penn State
and injured his ankle in his 12-6
win at Cornell. The senior grapp-
ler wures~tled to they finas o f the

the Big Ten and NCAA tourna-
ments.
Sophomore Jim Kamman and
Cal Jenkins will share the 147-
pound events, Tony Feick will be
at 167, and Bob Spaly at heavy-
weight.
"I'm planning on juggling the
lineups in order to wrestle all
those fellows that are making the
trip," Keen said yesterday.
Capable Wrestlers
Keen pointed out that both Illi-
nois and Purdue are not top Big
Ten teams but that each has some
capable wrestlers.

The Illini are led by Clay Beat-l
tie, a 157-pounder, who placedt
second to Southern Illinois' GeorgeI
McCreery in the Illinois Invita-
tional Meet Dec. 5. Beattie finished1
the highest of all the Illini entriesi
and is expected to be a Big Ten<
contender.7
Illinois has had its problems
losing several wrestlers because of
academic and physical reasons.
Joe Demke, 157-pound regular
dropped out of school and heavy-
weight Dave Russell has quit the
team. Dan Jeffrey will not com-
pete at 123-pounds because of the
head injury he received in fall
practice.
Gridder Wrestles
Football end Rich Callaghan
will hold down the 167-pound
class while Bob Shiveley, who
finished third in the invitational,
is at heavyweight.
Purdue, which lost to Indiana,
18-13, Saturday will host the Wol-
verines Saturday. The Boilermak-
ers also finished behind Michigan
State, Minnesota, and Northwest-
ern in a Jan. 2 quadrangular meet.
Their only other competition was

Dual Meet. In that tournament
they placed second to small col-
lege champion Bloomsburg, Pa.
The leading Purdue wrestler is
Ralph Trail, a 130-pounder, who
pinned Minnesota's Terry Barrett
at 1:58 of their quadrangular title
match.

ALL-M~i

DEPEN DABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART
319 W. Huron
665-3688

Friday, J1

La Grange (Ill.) Midlands Open................in the Dec. 12 Indiana State Tni-.
Tournament, but was hampered ~......'~. . .
emse atby his leg injury. He isdSat
urday's Pittsburgh meet and will
face both conference, opponents in
the 157-pound class this weekend. M r r
Chris Stowell returns to his 177-
pound division after missing the DAVE DOZEMAN
Pittsburgh meet. Stowell earlier - looking us for
won a 5-1 decision at Penn State
and a fall at Cornell.
Sophomore Bob Fehrs, fresh the best in
from a Midlands' championship -finest quality laundry-
and a Pittwin, will be Keen's en- 4t"T
tr-ant in the 123-pound bracket- ' O E. T PT
He will precede Doug Hornung!is15S
and Dave Dozemnan, Michigan's
130-pound contestants this week- BANKING
end. ozemanRecovered A & P CLEANERS
Dozeman will be grappling in l
his first meet since his crippling 312 E. Huron
automobile accident after the 1963 across from City Hall
season. Before the tragic event, 668 -9500
Dozeman finished third in both ________________
S.T.O.P. TOURS
(Student Travel Overseas Program)
HAS ARRANGED A SPECIAL TOUR
I .; - kA enkArerr'fl

SKI PARTY
TEE-'N- SKI
"-8 O'clock
* Transportation
furnished
* Bring skis to
the side of the
Union at 7:30
* MOVIES
* FREE LESSONS
A nrrn uir

L -- - -

_ It ;G
rf - -
1T $.

I

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