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January 14, 1965 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-14

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Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
THURSDAY, 14 JANUARY 1965 NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN BRYANT

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Romney as a Politician
Has a Long Way To Go

GOV. GEORGE ROMNEY seems to have
learned something from his unhappy
experience with the 1963 state Legisla-
ture when the complete lack of coopera-
tion between Romney and the Democratic
legislators resulted in the scuttling of
the governor's fiscal reform program.
Many observers commented at the time
that the Democrats voted against the
program, which was similar to tax plans
they had supported under Governors Wil-
liams and Swainson, because Romney
had not called them in to discuss the
plan prior to its presentation. He deliv-
ered his program and seemed to expect
it to pass as a matter of course.
Romney counted on the Republican ma-
jority in the Legislature to get his fiscal
plan through and believed it unnecessary
to deal with the Democrats until it was
too late. Now, however, with great Demo-
cratic majorities in both state houses, he
is forced to consider them if he wants
his legislative program to pass.
THAT HE REALIZES this is evidenced
by the two meetings he held recently
with Democratic legislative leaders. At
these meetings the participants defined
what they thought the areas of differ-
ence would be in the forthcoming session

of the Legislature. They did not attempt
to find any solutions.
The purpose of the meetings, then, was
simply political; by holding them Rom-
ney showed that he doesn't want to re-
peat his previous political blunder. But
though the governor seems to have learn-
ed this lesson, he still must watch hig
political step, or he may find that he
will alienate his fellow Republicans by
too much pandering to the Democrats.
Auditor General Allison Green, outgo-
ing House speaker, and Lt. Gov. William
Milliken (R-Traverse City) were the only
Republicans besides Romney present at
the two meetings. It took Sen. Garland
Lane (D-Flint), who seems to be watch-
ing Romney's political moves more close-
ly than the governor himself, to suggest
that the Republican minority leaders be
present at future meetings--a sugges-
tion to which the governor readily assent-
ed.
BUT THIS IS THE TYPE of idea the
governor should have presented on his
own. Romney has certainly become more
astute politically in the last two years,
but he has a long way to go before he can
legitimately present a flawless political
image.
--THOMAS R. COPI

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FROM 'THE WORLD OF APU' TO 'TOM JONES':
A Review of 1964's Best and Most Popular Films

By MICHAEL JULIAR
A MOTION PICTURE should be
judged on its enduring value
as cinematic excitement. If the
eye, ear and mind will mull over
the experience of seeing the pic-
ture, if some excitement is savor-
ed and can be expected to be
savored again, the film is a suc-
cess and will be seen for genera-
tions. This film is a masterpiece;
it cannot be expected every year.
But it can be hoped for.
After watching scores of films
every year, one becomes tired of
the common celluloid passed along
as top-notch, must-see experi-
ences. For instance, when as mild
a piece of entertainment as "The
Americanization of Emily" is en-
thusiastically applauded, I ques-
tion the quality of the criticism
of the young art.
One cannot separate entertain-
ment from what is supposed to be

intellectually exciting. It is a com-
mon American trait, an obvious
example of our anti-intellectual
culture, that when we relax, all
thoughts and ideas-anything re-
motely connected with the mental
processes-are to be foregone.
* * *
AMERICANS go to a movie
theatre to salve the mind. But the
cinema is not a Turkish bath. It
is a form of expression and so-
called arty or intellectual works
are also the most exciting and
therefore the most entertaining.
Unfortunately, our culture does
not subscribe to this precept and
the only way to support this ex-
pensive medium is to keep it on
a commercial level 99 per cent
of the time.
But attacks on this commer cial-
ism now get a bored reaction from
the film makers. We exacerbate
the patrons of the local theatres

Revolt, Movie- Goers

WHAT DO YOU DO when a monopoly
raises its prices?
Unhappy University moviegoers face
this problem. In December, all three
campus-area theatres quietly slipped the
tab up from $1 to $1.25 a head. Since
all three are part of the same theatre
chain, the Invisible Hand is unlikely to
intervene in behalf of the exploited con-
sumer.
Various irate students have suggest-
ed various ways to ease prices back down.
Among them:
-The classic method: Have a riot.
-The Ghandian method: Boycott these
theatres until the price is reduced. Both
of these methods, while quite satisfying
and possibly effective, lack originality,
so subtler techniques have been suggest-
ed.
-The getting your money's worth
method: Stage a sit-in of sorts. Since the

admission charge has been raised by 25
per cent, movie patrons should increase
correspondingly the length of time they
remain in the theatre. There's a certain
justice in the procedure: all the patrons
at the 7 o'clock show would stay for the
first quarter of the 9 o'clock show. Few
potential 9 o'clock customers, of course,
would be willing to wait around until
9:30, but that's show biz.
-The free enterprise method: Bring
in some competition. Given a rapidly ex-
panding student body, it shouldn't be im-
possible to attract some non-Butterfield-
chain theatres to Ann Arbor.
1WHATEVER THE METHOD, it is time
for an expression of consumer senti-
ment.
-KENNETH WINTER
Managing Editor

"This Is The Great Society?"

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World View from New York

and get a "don't watch it if you
don't like it, or go to your art
theatre" reaction. It may seem to
be a losing cause most of the time,
but it is the only way a serious
critic can react.
Since the University campus is
little different from the average
community, the film-going stu-
dent has little appreciation of the
film as art or what constitutes a
good motion picture. The theory,
history (except for that of a few
stars) and techniques of movie
making are unknown to him.
A MOVIE is meant to be enter-
taining, most students believe.
Whether or not it is an art form
is something entirely irrelevant
to them. This review of the year's
best and most popular films is
written, as the average Daily
movie criticism is, for the student
who has an interest in the cinema
and inswhat someone elseeth.nks
about the medium. It must in-
clude the presentations at the
Cinema Guild to make possible a
decent-sized list of the good films
that have been presented to Ann
Arbor this year.
"SEDUCED AND ABANDONED"
-the second best film I have seen
this year. It was not only funny
and sardonic, but director Pietro
Germi used the medium with tech-
nical virtuosity to create visual
impressions that can only be done
with the film. For some, the act-
ing was too heavily boistrous, but
I accepted every iota of energy
put into the parts by the irrate
father, the dishonored daughter
and the dishonoring young man.
As an incisive examination of the
Sicilian character, it is merciless
and human.
"A HARD DAY'S NIGHT"
seeing this was like being ener-
gized, pumped with pep pills and
'shot to the moon. It is one of the
few movies I have ever seen that
demonstrated what the motion
picture can do. Done in semi-
documentary fashion, the movie
made the spectator feel that he
was a part of the action, not just
a witness. This was done with
many editing and compositional
techniques that one can only ad-
mire. It was like watching spon-
taneous combustion take place.
Whether what was shown of
the four moppets was true to life
or only good acting fun on their
part is not important. I do have
some reservations on how the
chase scene at the end was han-
dled and the soporific crudity of
some of the jokes. And half of the
dialogue should have been sub-
titled for our American ears. But
my eye was usually too busy to
worry about what my ear was
missing.
Some of the films of last year
that were outstanding to a lesser
extent were "The Easy Life"'and
"America, America."
THEN THERE were the popu-
lar films.
"DR. STRANGELOVE"-Strik-
ing to some people because of
the way it handled some subject
matter that had been taboo at
the time, was forced, unfunny and
only momentarily terrifying.
"TOM JONES"-Actually from
1963, but shown in Ann Arbor in
1964, was a one-shot laugh for
those who had not read the book
in a while. It was a silly and
prudish exercise, even though some
individual scenes did rise to the
occasion.
"CLEOPATRA - It fell with
the thunderous sound of $42 mil-
lion ringing in our ears.
Two very fine films never made
it to the city last year and maybe
never will. Louis Malle's "Le Feu
Follet" ("The Fire Within") and

during a semester. I saw all but
five of the programs.
The outstanding film of the
semester, and of the entire year,
was by Satyajit Ray-"The World
of Apu." He is the finest director
in the world today. He operates
in a tradition that is less in-
novation than that of many of
his co-workers in the European
countries, but there is no finer
humanist. He is the poet of the
cinema. There are very few artists,
even in other mediums, that can
equal him.
Jean Vigo's last film, "L'Atal-
ante" did not make him very
well known. Accordingly, it was
sparsely attended when it came
to the Guild. Too many people
missed a stimulating experience.
FEDERICO Fellini's "The Nights
of Cabiria" displays a characteris-
tic enthusiasm for life.
Akira Kurosawa's "Ikiru" was
too meaty and satiating to satisfy
all tastes because of Kurosawa's
passion for the doomed protagon-
ist. But it is.a masterpiece.
Everybody is familiar with
"Modern Times."
Michelangelo Antonioni's "L'-
Avventura" needs several viewings

ROOFTOP VIEW FROM SAIGON;
OFFICIAL VIEW FROM WASHINGTON;
WORLD VIEW FROM NEW YORK.
"When Ngo Dinh Diem's government
fell, more than a year ago, a Time/Life
News Service correspondent watched the
attack on the palace from a rooftop less
than 200 yards away.
"Time/Life's Washington staff turned
up the hard news of the coup itself two
hours before anything came through on
the Saigon ticker.
"In New York, editors were getting re-
action stories."
So reads the opening of a two-page,
full-color advertisement in a national
magazine this week for Time/Life News
Service, "the largest newsgathering force
of any publication or broadcast network
in the world."
EVIDENTLY TIME has a pretty short
memory. Last month when David Hal-
berstam, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York
H. NEIL BERKSON, Editor
KENNETH WINTER KEDWARD HERSTEIN
Managing Editor Editorial Director
ANN GWIRTZMAN ............... Personnel Director
BILL BULLARD....................Sports Editor
MICHAEL SATTINGER .... Associate Managing Editor
JOHN KENNY ............ Assistant Managing Editor
DEBORAH BEATTIE.... Associate Editorial Director
LOUIS LIND.......... Assistant Editorial Director in
Charge of the Magazine
TOM ROWLAND............Associate Sports Editor
GARY WINER ..,............. Associate Sports Editor
STEVEN HALLER...............Contributing Editor
MARY LOU BUTCHER............Contributing Editor
JAMES KESON ................... Chief Photographer
NIGHT EDITORS:..David Block, John Bryant, Robert
Johnston, Laurence Kirshbaum, Karen Weinhouse.
* 4ZT xmA TI NUTfT." VnT' . * ,.. T a1,p T Biiam

by anyone who wishes to under-
stand why it is such a fine film.
Still, I will always prefer Fellini
to Antonioni's paced and symbolic
introspection.
D. W. Griffith's "The Birth of
a Nation" is too commonplace to-
day to allow us to understand
what it meant to a 1915 audience.
That would not be true of a real
masterpiece, which would continue
to be significant to most people
after any amount of mimicking
and unchecked plagiarism.
* * *
THERE WERE two films that
attracted large audiences and
were no disappointments. Mae
West in "She Done Him Wrong"
was fun, and the college audience
knows how to accept the innu-
endoes and double-entendres in
her repertory.
"Notorious" had a loose end or
two, but is one of the best Alfred
Hitchcock films. He is the 'master
of what Francois Truffaut thinks
must be done by any film maker
who calls himself an artist-
creating an emotion in the audi-
ence (which is not hard to do)
and sustaining that emotion as
long as necessary (which is ex-
tremely difficult).

Times South Viet Nam correspondent
spoke here, he told at length of a friend,
Charles Mohr, Time's Southeast Asia bu-
reau chief.
It seems that Time asked Mohr for a
dispatch on the situation in Saigon dur-
ing the summer of 1963. Mohr filed a
long pessimistic story, saying that things
were not looking good for Diem.
The Time editors with their "New York
world-view" chose to disregard their cor-
respondent's story. They ran an article
saying that indeed things were looking
good for Viet Nam and Diem.
When Mohr asked what had happened
to his dispatch, the editors wrote and said
he "did not understand the big picture."
Well a few weeks later Diem fell: Time
was wrong. Mohr quit shortly thereafter.
AS THE AD SAYS:
"This is an example of how Time In-
corporated endeavors to bring informa-
tion and understanding to people every-
where."
-R. RAPOPORT
Details
A REPORT issued today by the Indus-
trial Development Division of the In-
stitute of Science and Technology indi-
cates that Michigan's future economic
growth is largely dependent on utiliza-
tion of new technologies that the being
nurtured in the state universities' re-
search programs.
To quote, "New technologies can fur-
ther vitalize the state's already strong
machinery and metalworking industry
base."

'MEMBER OF THE WEDDING':
Great Play, Good Film
At the Cinema Guild
"THE MEMBER of the Wedding," released in 1952, was directly
adapted from the highly-regarded stage version of Mrs. Carson
McCullers' 1946 novel.
The "plot" itself is tenuous; the substance and delight of the
work are contained in character portrayal. Frankie is a 12-year-old
girl in a small contemporary Georgia town whose brother is getting
married. Having only a 7-year-old neighbor boy as a pal, Frankie
despairs of not belonging-of being only a "I," not part of a "we."
Her love for the soon-to-be married couple is also a desire for joining
them to become part of a we-three, and she decides to accompany
them on the honeymoon "and forever and ever."
On the stage, superb and definitive performances were turned
in by the leads. Such a stereotyped role as the Negro cook/mammy
will probably never be more satisfactorily portrayed than by Ethel
Waters.
* *' * *
AS FRANKIE, Julie Harris passionately pursued her search for
identity and a sense of belonging. Her volatility and tantrums accur-
ately and sympathetically reproduced the awkwardness, physical and
emotional, of the uncertain pre-teen. Indeed, the sense of alienation
seems almost psychopathological, if not an unwitting existential cry.
The film preserves nearly all that shone so brilliantly under the
lights, but an important flaw is introduced. Unlike theatre perform-
ances, we see, through the camera's eye, Miss Harris as too grown up
for the role. Her face. neck and the expressions intertwined thereon.

PASSING THE PLAQUES:
Present ing Awards.,for
Unsung'College Heroes
By ROGER RAPOPORT
EACH YEAR outstanding achievement in the arts, sciences and
industry is recognized through various awards. There are the
Emmy Awards, Academy Awards, Pulitzer Prizes, and Nobel Prizes.
However, a large number of significant achievements on the college
level go unnoticed. Therefore in the hope that worthy universities,
administrators, institutions and students receive the acclaim they
deserve, here are the first annual "Unsung College Heroes Awards:"
LIPTON TEA AWARD-To Mrs. Harlan Hatcher. When an angry
student mob came to her back door after a protest rally, she met
their demands by inviting them all back to the President's tea the
next day.
MACHIAVELLI AWARD-To University of California at Berkeley
Chancellor Edward Strong. He saw that all the bathrooms in the
administration building were lock-
ed before the 18-hour Dec. 5
student sit-in began.f>
MAHATMA GANDHI AWARD-
To the passive University of Cali-
fornia students at the Berkeley
sit-in. Total damage to the ad-
ministration building amounted to
a set of hinges taken from two
locked bathroom doors.
A. B. DICK MIMEOGRAPH
AWARD - To University Prof. MRS. HATCHER TONSOR
Stephen Tonsor who called off a History 101 mid-term examination
five minutes after it started. His secretary hadn't run off enough
copies of the test.
THE CECILLE B. DEMILLE AWARD-To Notre Dame University
for winning an injuction against "John Goldfarb Please Come Home."
THE JOE MCCARTHY AWARD-To "Newsweek" magazine for
calling Students for a Democratic Society "socialist oriented."
THE JOHN PETER ZENGER AWARD-To the administration
of Roosevelt University, Chicago, for firing the editorial board of the
Roosevelt Torch for printing a true story that the president was
being fired and the school was $700,000 in debt.
JOHN PHILLIP SOUSA AWARD-To Leonard Falcone, director
of the Michigan State University Marching Band. Falcone said he'd
be happy to go back to South Bend after his band was attacked
there by a mob of Notre Dame
r students at the Notre Dame-
' Michigan State game, resulting in
$700 damage.
ASPHALT JUNGLE AWARD-
To the students of the University
of Detroit for running down Liver-
nois to the John Lodge Freeway
A and blocking all six lanes of
traffic for two hours to protest
the university's decision to drop
RUSSELL REVELLI football.
JOHND EWEV AWARD-To aliforni Tniiit tof Tehnnonov

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