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April 16, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWA!

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IDAY.16 "RIL 1095 ,

S.

TUDENT POPULATION BOOM: - -
EstabNshes Fir
Overcrowded Dorm itories: A Nationwide Problem 'For Radio-TV

ost Program
Internship

p

i

By MERLE JACOB
Overcrowded dormitories here
are but one manifestation of a
crowding problem that is facing
all universities across the country.
The housing situation, while
immediately felt, is only one as-
pect of the general trend of over-
crowding that has plagued all
educational levels since the war
a n d post-war babies entered
school.
Universities have felt the im-
pact of overcrowding in the last
10 years. With more students
feeling they must go on to college
and a birth rate which has re-
mained at a fairly high level
since the war, educators see no
numerical relief for the univer-
sities.
Become Acute
The problem of providing resi-
dential facilities for the burgeon-
ing student population has be-
come acute since 1957. At that
time according to figures from the
Office of Health, Education and
Welfare, both public and private
universities were accommodating
660,000 students in dorms.
By 1961 there were 750,000 stu-
dents being accommodated. How-
ever university administrators in
1961 were planning on housing

l
r
7
7

more than 400,000 more students largest percentage of housing apply. One new dorm is planned
by 1965. programs. and should be ready by 1966.
Housing facilities were built or More Students The University of Illinois turn-
expanded as overcrowding became The Great Lakes and Plains ed away 5,000 students this year
more prevalent. Usually the facil- area has more students in over- partly because of overcrowded
ities were built to take care of crowded housing than any other conditions in both classrooms and
immediate overcrowding and not area of the United States. While dormitories. A new high rise for
with an eye to alleviate future the Midwest has a larger num- 1,100 students opened this fall.
conditions. ber of the total college students but no new dorms are planned
As has been the case with Mich- than any other area, it houses for at least two more years. There
igan in the past few years, admis- the lowest proportion of its stu- has been doubling up and stu-
sions directors have set their esti- dents. dents in temporary housing this
mates on incoming students too Because of the large number of year, the Daily Illini reported. The
low, and not enough housing has students that attend school in university has leased some pri-
been planned. this area, the universities allow vate homes and made them into
Great Crowding many students to live in off- dorms to relieve the situation.
As of 1961, nationally, there campus, private, or fraternity- Private Dorms
was a net overcrowding in resi- sorority housing, which thus keeps
dential facilities of about 102 per- the proportion of students in' The University of Wisconsin at
cent of normal capacity. The ma- university housing low. Madison has relieved itself of the
jority of overcrowding resulted Dartmouth in Hanover, New dorm problem by allowing stu-
from doubling and tripling in Hampshire, reported that this dents to live in privately operated
dorms and the use of substandard Hampove,5ro red oubledh!sresidence halls. The university
facilities. year over 50 rooms were doubled maintains a number of dormitor-
The state of Michigan is one of trip Datout h ies, but only a set number of stu-
Thestae o Mihign i on ofonly 2600 students living in dor-j den~ts live in them. Students who
ten states in the country which ( mitories. The rest of the students are turned away must live in the
has a high rate of students hous- live in fraternities, private halls which generally are
publieyoand normal capacity.Only To alleviate the situation the more expensive than the univer-
plic and private institutions in college has remodeled a music sity owned dorms, the Daily Card-
Alaska and Delaware had a high- practice building into a dorm, and inal explained.
er rate of overcrowding. How- has allowed students to break
ever Michigan was not among hei room stracts th wish Students there can also live in
those states which planned, a to moe int ratity th apartments or in fraternity-soror-
large percentage of expansion. mout apernreporte ity houses. Finding apartments
Universities in Wyoming, Dela- Dartmouweverthe new dorm and most has become difficult because the
ware and Utah have initiated the fraternity house a now id.Madison building code prohibits
Administratorsareinvestiat.i large apartment buildings. The
Adinthe iaors are investigatmg number of students wanting
W interwTerm thech ubldta cae o apartments has grown while the
'e inier ier m uate and undergraduate students maine E
ition Schedule which are attending Dartmouth. sicnhian State inr ast an-
Rejecting Students sing has had some problems with
DAY In the Midwest, Iowa State at overcrowding, but much of it has
Ames and the University of Illi- mit ryallebilding prth huge dohic
Exam nois at ChamDai--n-Urbana, over- the university has carried on, the
Central Campus North Campus crowding is forcing the universi- ! Michigan State News reported.
8:00-10:00 7:30- 9:30 ties to turn away students.
8:00-10:00 7:30- 9:30 At Iowa the administration has Keeping Abreast
8:00-10:00 7:30- 9:30 allowed all women above the Four dorms each housing over
8:00-10:00 7:30- 9:30 freshman level to live in off- 1,000 students will be opened in
. 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30 campus housing. This is an ex- 1965 and 1966 and should keep
8:00-10:00 7:30- 9:30 ception to the university rule the university abreast of its hous-
...... 8:00-10:00 7:30- 9:30 which only allowed women over ing situation. Over 15,000 students
... 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30 21 to have apartments. The Iowa -
..... 10:30-12:30 10:30-12:30 State Daily reported that women's
dorms can house only 1,704 stu- DIAL
DAY dents while over 2,200 women will 662-6264 a

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were housed in dorms last term,
the newspaper reported.
The University of Texas in
Austin is discussing plans for a
new dormitory for men. At pres-
ent, the Daily Texan reported,
only 11 percent of the men en-
rolled in the university live in
university-owned housing.
The last dorm built was in
1955 and since that time the en- -
rollment has increased by 10,000.
Most men are forced to live in
off-campus apartments or pri-
vate dorms which may be very
expensive or sub-standard. If built}
the new dorm would not bex
ready for at least three years so
momentarily conditions are not
being helped.
High-rise
The University of Colorado is
planning two high-rise housing
structures which will be ready in
1966. Presently the residence
halls are filled over capacity, the
Colorado Daily explained. The
dorms hold 4,415 students and are
overcrowded.
Stanford University in Stan-
ford, Calif., has the long range
goal of becoming a residential
college.
One-third
Of the 10,000 students enrolled
at the university only 4,570 live
in university housing. Enough
dorms would have to be built to
house all the people off-campus
besides rehabilitating the dorms
presently on campus. With the
high cost of building new dorms,
the university has little choice but
to let students live off campus.
Across the country the hous-
ing condition is generally the
same-overcrowded dorms and
not enough money or land to
build new ones. Private dorms,
off-campus apartments and new
university dorms which are mas-
sive in size are some of the new
developments which are being
used to meet the situation.

However, according to figures
from the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, public
and private universities will have
to start on long-range building
programs now if the schools are
to relieve the overcrowded condi-
tions which now exist and which
will definitely get worse in the
coming years.
CrrS
FAcros
yCampus.
FRIDAY, APRIL 16

The department of journalism in the University, while fulfilling
recently established the first grad- his internship.
uate radio-television internship This program extends the Uni-
t n versity's journalism internships
Sprogram in the nation inconnec-from newspapers and advertising
tion with Time-Life Inc. agencies to the media in elec-
Arrangements have been con- tronic journalism. The intern pro-
cluded to give two-year intern gram provides two years of on-
training to a University journal- the-job training following two
ism student beginning May 3. The years of advanced studies in jour-
in~ernship will take place in Grand nalism and social sciences.
Rapids at WOOD-WOOD Televi- .The significance of the Univer-
sion, a Time-Life broadcasting sity's journalism internship pro-
station. gram is that it provides an effec-
The graduate student selected tive procedure for bringing gradu-
by the department of journalism ates of special competence and
is Jack Huizenga, who will receive specialized academic preparation
his M.A. degree this May. with top quality staffs," said Prof.
Under the internship arrange- Wesley H. Maurer, chairman of
ments, Huizenga will be enrolled the journalism department.

I

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4:15 p.m.-James J. Gibson of
Cornell University will speak at a
psychology colloquium in Aud. C.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Henry King's "Tol'able
David" in the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The astronomy de-
partment visitors' night *ill pre-
sent Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin
speaking on Mars. The lecture will
be held in Aud. D.
8:30 p.m. - The music school
will present a recital of organ:
music by Prof. Robert Glasgow
of the music school in Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, APRIL 17
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present a Harold Lloyd Comedy
Program in the Architecture Aud.
SUNDAY, APRIL 18
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present a Harold Lloyd Comedy
Program in the Architecture Aud.

Y

,t
luffy~intem
at
MASONIC AUDITORIU1 M
Saturday, April 24 8:00 P.M.
Tickets:
84.50 $3.50 2.50 1.50
an sale at
Grinnell's, Downtown; Marwil's, Northland;
Discount Records, 300 S. State, A.A.
For Mail Orders, enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope

::

Announce'65
Final Examim

MON

Time

8
9
10,
11
12
1
2
3
4

A
B
C
D
Q
E.
F
G
R

Tues., April 20.........
Wed., April 21..........
Thurs., April 22........
Fri., April 23.........
Mon., April 26..........
Sat., April 24........
Mon., April 26...........
Tues., April 27...........
Sat., April 24....... . ..
TUES

lj

ITE

SHOWS START AT
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00 & 9.00

Time

Exam

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3

H
I
J
K
S
M
N
P

Sat., April:
Fri., April
Thurs., April
Mon., April
Fri., April
Wed., April
Tues., April
Sat., April

C
24.. ...............
23... .......:....'..
22 ..............
26.................
23... ............
21 ..................
20....... .........
24.................

Central Campus
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
10:30-12:30
4:00- 6:00
4:00- 6:00
4:00- 6:00
10:30-12:30

North Campus
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
110:30-12:30
4:30- 6:30
4:30- 6:30
4:30- 6:30
10:30-12:30

COMING
WOMAN IN

II

, gi~f~ ringS hiS best
~,mto the bech7
SELLEY
GARY iTJOY 1ARYANN IHAOLOJ CHRAS
inl PANA\ASION~and METIOCOU:)

mmop"'Wo"Irw

I'

4 T Thurs., April 22... .

.

Special Periods
Each course, except English 123 and 220, requiring a special
examination, is assigned two examination code letters. If one is

preferred by the department, it is in boldface type;
elect the other only if a conflict occurs and special
secured from the department.
Special Periods Schedule
Central Campus

Delta..Wed., April 21..............
L,.....Wed., April 21...............
0......Tues., April 27.............. .
Pi.....Tues., April 27..............
U. . ...Tues., April 20 ................,
Phi.....Tues., April 20 ... ............ .
V. . . Thurs., April 22 ..... . .......... .
W ......Fri., April 23 ........ ...... .
X....Tues., April 27.................
Y.....Mon., April 26 ............. .
Z......To be arranged

10:30-12:30
1:30- 3:30
4:00- 6:00
8:00-10:00
1:30- 3:30
10:30-12:30
4:00- 6:00
4:00- 6:00
1:30- 3:30
4:00- 6:00

students may
permission is
North Campus
10:30-12:30
1:30- 3:30
4:30- 6:30
7:30- 9:3t
1:30- 3:30
10:30-12:30
4:30- 6:30
4:30- 6:30
1:30- 3:30
4:30- 6:30

THE DUNES
NOW
ZORBA
THE GREEK
Winner of 3

r

I

All
Seats $1.75
WINNER OF
ACA D
3AWA R [

DIAL
8-6416

I

I

i

EMY
DS

T

i f i i .

I

I

Academy
ANTHONY

Awa rd s

QUINN

ALAN BATES

School of Business AdministrationI
Course Examination Code Letter
Accounting 271, 500.........S,W
Accounting 272, 501 . .......L,V
Bus. Admin. 306, 506 .'. . Delta,T
Bus. Admin. 450 ......Phi, Delta
Finance 301.................S,W
Indust. Rel. 300, 500 ........ U,N
Marketing 300, 301, 500, 501 V,Y
Statistics 311, 511..........T,P
Statistics 505.............. S,W
College of Engineering
Eng. Graphics 101 .. . .Phi, Delta
Eng. Graphics 102, 104 ......U,L
Literary College
Chemistry 104, 106........Pi,O
Economics 101, 102, 103, 104,
401...n.............O.,X
Economics 271..... . ,...... S,W

Economics 272 ............. L,V
English 123, 220............. L
French 101, 102, 103, 111, 112,
221, 222, 231, 232, 361,{
362 .. .............. ...U,M
German 101, 102, 111, 231,
232, 236..............Phi, T
Italian 101, 102 ........... Phi, T
Latin 103, 221, 222 .......... N,U
Mathematics 115, 116 .. ....V,W
Physics 154 ....... ....... Y,Q
Psychology 380 ..............Y,X
Russian 101, 102, 201, 202,
302, 402............... S,R{
Russian 352 ..............Phi, T
Russian 452 ................M,V
Sociology 380 ........... .. Y,X#
Spanish 101, 102, 103, 221.
222, 231, 232.......Delta, T

"ANT HONY QUINN IS BRILLIANTI"
- Bosley Crowther. N.Y. Times
ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATES-IRENE PAPAS
MICHAELCACOYANNIS PRODUCTION
"ZORBATHE GREEK"
AN IN ERNATONAL CLASSICSEPRESENTAfON
Tonight at 6:40 and 9:08
Saturday and Sunday from 1 p.m.

Week Day
Matinees.,,5$1.00
Nights &
Sunday... $1.25

Union Major Dund, , ... Co ,,drate Captain Ty,, ,n... ,On,-A ed Sa, Pots,,... ,TheBy-Faced Bugler...
Commanded a regiment of Swore to kill the man he His passions were He killed his first enemy
renegades and deserters! called commander! whiskey and slaughtert and kissed his first woman!

ApRITON ESTON RICHARDHARRIS
IM HUTTO JAMES OH [C-ICAR ESN

a,itfulo usa..
She made men forget
the heat of battle!

Will be shown for
at least two more weeks

I

DIAL
662-6264

STARTS
SUNDAY

4 Shows Daily
at 1 :00-3:30
6:05 and 8:45

JOHN FORD'S
L_9r E

f "
f "
I "
* "
U "
U "
f C e
* /
* "
* /
f ,
/ f
" f
f "
Henry King's silent classic of small-town Southern life N
i /

U, _______________________________, 1

BUGGED BY FINALS?
ESCAPE!
Drag a date kicking and screaming
to see some kicking and screaming
in Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's
(IIflT IN TI: DARK

I

* U
TOMORROW and SUNDAY: HAROLD LLOYD COMEDY PROGRAM
1 U
HAROLD, THE STAGE DOORMAN
STEP LIVELY
BACKS TOGETHER
JUST NEIGHBORS
U I
i ~Plus1
I 1
U /
U CHARLIE CHAPLiN in
THE IDLE CLASS
CRY OF THE CHILDREN
1 U
THURSDAY and FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 23: e
U CHARLIE CHAPLIN in SHOULDER ARMS
U
plus u
1U
1 LAUREL AND HARDY in CRIMINALS AT LARGE
W
* and
U W. C. FI ELDS in THE ODD BALL

StaRrin nnIRK " . K AGI ml IF

I
~1,

I

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I

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