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April 11, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*Y A OM

SUNDAY, 11 APRIL 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILYJT

as as rr yrya{..1L1VC1.i L1 11I1

PAC

LGE

Blue Squad Takes Spring Grid Finale

17 - --

..._...

By CHUCK VETZNER
The maize and blue electric
scoreboards at Michigan Stadium
only kept track of the playing
time in yesterday's annual intra-
squad football scrimmage. Perhaps
* the score wasn't posted to save
money on the electricity bills, but
the idea also saved the White
team from added embarrassment,
as the Blue team trounced them
by a score of 50-8.
Head Coach Bump Elliott broke
with tradition by not dividing the
squad equally, deciding to let the
first string offense and defense
stand the rest of the squad. The
decision made the slaughter a
predictable outcome, but Elliott
was not only concerned with en-
tertaining the fans.
Impact Intact.
"We kept the first units intact
because they didn't have any pre-
vious chance to play together,"
Football Tickets
Tickets for all six home foot-
ball games next fall, or for any
of the four away games can be
ordered by mail with a check
payable to the Michigan Ticket
Department for $5 per ticket.
With a sellout crowd expect-
ed for the Ohio State and
Michigan State games, as well
as several of the away games,
Ticket Manager Don Weir ad-
vised students to mail the re-
quests now, rather than waiting
until the fall when none may
be available.
Elliott explained afterwards.
Usually the first units play
the reserves in the first few spring
scrimmages, but the Wolverines
were unable to get outside for
their regular Saturday practice
until yesterday.
In view of these circumstances,
the coaching staff was especially
happy with the results. "I'm very
pleased," said Elliott. "The boys
hit well and played a good game."
The Blue collected a total of
443 yards, 308 of them on the
ground. The White had 48 yards
on the ground, but negative rush-
ing yardage in the second half.
Jim Seiber led the White passing
attack with 47 out of a total 71
yards.
One of the weakest aspects of
the game was the kicking. Since
most of the practice was in Yost
Field House, kicking drills were
impossible. The team only spent
one day exercising their "tal-
ented toes," and the lack of prac-

touchdown of the game with a
five-yard run late in the first
quarter. Gabler directed the team
to two markers.
After Vidmer's touchdown and
two-point conversion toss to fresh-
man end Rock Rosema, the Blue
quickly increased its margin.
The White attack stalled and
'M' Club
All varsity athletes in the
'M' Club should pick up ballots
this week for the most out-
standing senior athlete award
to be given at the Ann Arbor
Quarterback Club. Mrs. Mary
Parker at the Athletic Admin-
istration Bldg. has the ballots
and the award will be selected
between Kent Bernard, Bill
Buntin, and Bob Timberlake.
Dave Fisher moved the ball30
yards in two plays. With the ball
on the seven, Vidmer galloped to
the one where Fisher drove over
for the first of his two scores.
Vidmer added the frostingwith
another two-point conversion.
A Chance
The next time the Blue had the
ball, Gabler got his chance and
set up a score with a 22-yard pass
to Mike Bass. Barry Dehlin, who
spends most of his time at line-
backer, scored the first of his
two touchdown swith a one-yard
plunge.
Late in the second quarter, the
White managed their only points

of the afternoon, as signal caller
Seiber directed the attack. New-
comer Dick Smith scampered 22
yards around end for the key playi
in the drive.
Denny Morgan, wvho was the
top rusher for the White with 35
yards, bulled over from a yard out.
The conversion was successful, as
Seiber and Jim Berline, two for-
mer high school pupils of line
coach Tony Mason, clicked on a
pass play.
With the score 36-8 for the
Blue, Elliott sent in Salmi who
finished the job.

UNIVERSITY CHOIR
Thomas Hilbush, Conductor
SPRING CONCERT
MASS IN C-Beethoven
with University Orchestra
LES NOCES--Stravinsky
(The Wedding)
with four pianos and percussion
SUNDAY, APRIL 11
at Hill Auditorium-8:30 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE

SEVEN

_._ .
-------------

RENT AN ECON-O-CAR
GOING-HOME SPECIALS
I Let Us Help You Plan Your Transportation

-..

-Daily-Jim Lines
FULLBACK DAVE FISHER barrels through a big hole in the line cleared by Bill Keating (left) and
Tom- Mack. Fisher scored two touchdowns in yesterday's spring scrimmage intra-squad game. Play-
ing for the victorious Blue team, Fisher gained 48 yards rushing. Keating is this year's recipient
of the Meyer W. Morton award which was won by Mack last spring.

* Low Rates to N.Y., Chicago, Dallas, etc.
* Round Trip or One-Way Rates
* Rent A Car For House Transportation to Airports
and Save
* -Low Weekly Rates Between Semesters
Get A Group and Share The Savings
Call 663-2033 for reservations--students 19 yrs.

tice was obvious. The kickoffs were
constantly being grabbed near the
25-yard line. No place kick con-
versions were even attempted.
Stan Kemp only punted once
for the Blue, but it was a fine
44-yard effort. White punter Ed
Green had seven opportunities and
could manage only a 32.3 aver-
age.
Scribblers
Although tense would not be the
proper adjective to describe the
action, both teams put on a good
show for the 4000 spectators, the
11 top Michigan basketball Iros-
pects, plus Georgia scouts, who
were scribbling notes furiously in
preparation for their opening
game with the Wolverines next
September.
In addition to the familiar num-
bers, the scouts undoubtedly jot-
ted down the names of Wally
Gabler and Dick Vidmer. They
also nearly got, an ulcer when an
unnumbered player scored two
quick touchdowns late in the
fourth quarter.
The mystery man turned out to
be sophomore-to-be quarterback
Terry Salmi, who wore a blue
jersey over his white uniform.
Salmi, a man who doesn't play

favorites, saw action first for the
reserves and then switched sides
to gain 28 yards through the air
in addition to his 10 and three-
yard scoring jogs.
Until Salmi's surprise appear-
ance, the Blue quarterbacking
had been handled by Gabler and,
Vidmer. Gabler was the game's'
top passer with 61 yards and top
rusher with 64 yards.
Vidmer, who was billed the heir

apparent to Bob Timberlake last
spring but who broke his leg in
the autumn, collected 73 total
yards, 46 of them passing.
The coaches praised the per-
formances of both men, but de-
spite the statistical advantage for
Gabler, the general consensus was
that Vidmer still appeared to be
a shade better.
Vidmer engineered three scor-
ing marches, and tallied the first

TI

IF

CHANGE POSITIONS:
Keating, Rosema Win
Spring Football Honors
Two Michigan football players :
who have undergone position
changes during spring practice
were selected for achievement
honors yesterday by the coaching
staff.
Bill Keating won the Meyer W.
Morton Trophy, given since 1925
to the player showing the greatest
development in spring practice.
Rocky Ro sema was awarded the
J ckh n Maulbetsch Scholarship,
given to a freshman football play-
er on the basis of needscholar-
ship, capacity, and desire for
leadership and success.
Keating, presently a junior, was:?.{4 i:":.
switched from defensive tackle to
offensive guard, and according to
line coach Tony Mason Keating
has been outstanding at the new
position.
Keating's brother, Tom, won
the same award two years ago.
Last year's winner, Tom Mack, is
presently starting at offensive
tackle. Mack also won the award
while switching positions. BILL KEATING
S to give and enjoy for Easter

How to spend a weekend
in Chicago for $16
JUDY CHAPMAN
Western College
Oxford, Ohio
says, "'Any
''tiĀ£. J.student man
xzzor woman, canl
Chicago's
YMCA Hotel
and enjoy a
weekend for
# 600Hereis
how I did it.*
Fri. P.M. Dinner at YMCA Hotel $1.25
Chicago Symphony 2.50
Room at Y Hotel 2.95
Sat. A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Art Institute Tour Free
Lunch at Stouffer's 1.45
Sat. P.M. Nat. Hist. Museum Tour Free
Dinner at Y Hotel 1.25
Sat.nite dance, Y Hotel .15
Coke date .45
Room at Y Hotel 2.95
LSun. A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Worship at Central Church
Lunch at Y Hotel 1.30

eight hundred fuller
A Proud New Address

Sun. P.M. Back to campus

Total $15.41,

EXCITINGLY MODERN, EIGHT HUNDRED FULLER is thoughtfully planned to offertoal the
conveniences of contemporary apartment living in a relaxed suburban atmosphere, together
with the cultural advantages of a University City. Poised gracefully above the Huron River,
Eight Hundred Fuller is within walking distance of the campus of the University of Michigan
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FOR INFORMATION
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED APARTMENTS CALL
AVAILABLE FOR SUMMER ONLY 663-6549
AT REDUCED RATES. M
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RESIDENT MANAGER

MEN WOMEN FAMILIES
Stay at Chicago's
YMCA HOTEL
826 South Wabash
at the edge of the Loop
aceommodations for 2,000 s rates $2.95 and up
Write for reservations or call 922-3183

If

This summer,
adventure through
EUROPE

I al T

.____..

CANDIES

I

EASTER SUNDAY, APRIL 18th,

TIIIEIT' If you have Used Books
JIUTUDEINIJto Sell-Read This!
As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy book selling by students-ULRICH'S
would like to review with you their BOOK BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which--because of the law of supply and demand-has
its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS 1.
A textbook of current copyrights-used on our campus-and which the Teaching Department involved
has approved for re-use next semester-has the highest market value. If ULRICH'S needs copies of this book
we will offer 50% of the list price for copies in good physical condition. When we have sufficient stock of a title
for the coming semester, ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will be explained later in this
article. (THIS IS ONE REASON FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE.)
CLASS II.
Some of the above Class I books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose pages or other physical
defects. These will be priced down according to the estimated cost of repair.

T

A

has the right tours
at the right prices.
Would you like to sun-bathe on the Mediterranean? Browse in
the Louvre? Live with a family in Spain? Or just roam through
Rome? TWA offers you the adventure of your choice, from
14 to 68 days, at a reasonable price. You can visit Europe's
historic sights, hear delightful music, watch sparkling
drama. Tours also combine sightseeing with college
courses at famous universities.
You travel with people your own age and meet people of
your own age in Europe. Explore the most interesting
places in England, France, Spain, Italy and many other
countries. All accommodations are reserved in advance.
Travel by comfortable motorcoach, or visit out-of-the-
way towns and villages by bicycle. Wherever you want
to go, whatever you want to do, TWA has a tour that suits

I

CLASS I.
Each semester various professors decide to change texts for a given course. These decisions on change of
textbooks are made in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY for above the level of your local book retail-
ers, AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (QUITE OFTEN WE HAVE MANY COPIES OF THE
OLD TITLE OF WHICH YOU HAVE ONLY ONE.)
However, ULRICH'S DO enter the picture with our WHOLESALE connections. Somewhere there may be a
professor who will adopt a cast-off book from Michigan. WHOLESALE BOOK JOBBERS take a gamble on this
and offer to buy our over-stock and yours.
If the dropped title is a current edition, and from a well known publisher, the Jobber offer to us is us-
ually 25% of list. AS A SERVICE TO YOU, ULRICH'SWILL BUY THESE DROPPED TITLES FOR WHAT THE
JOBBER OFFERS.
CLASS IV.
Authors and publishers frequently bring out new.editions. When we "get caught" with an old edition,
let's accept the fact that it has no value on the wholesale market, and put it on the shelf as a reference book
or sell it cheap for a bargain reference book.

ASSORTED CHOCOLATES
Jib. BOX $160

EASTER BASKET %i

I

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