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April 10, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-10

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PAGE TWO

TH MICHIGAN iD ~ r r ULA Ui.j U

A off r. 1v1 f i~ i1 fi t1 1 (1171 1, w

SATURDAY. 10 APRIL 1965

5

'64 Election Data
Ready for Analysis.

Plan Trip ACROSSCAMPUS:
rP'UN AsscnI

0

Lion To Convene in Union

For Study SATURDAY, APRIL 10
8:30 a.m.-Tre United Nations
Association will hold a conference
In L u g at the Michigan Union.
8:45 a.m.-Registration of the
Conference for Teachers of Dri-

By NANCY SUNDHEIM quired to evaluate the relative
The Institute for Social Re- importance of given factors and
to establish evidence of casual
search has completed its study relationships, he added.
of the 1964 elections. "An analy- Clausen explained that a com-
sis of the data has not been at- ltsen linedhalays be
tempted yet," Aage Clausen, study plete analysis would always be
director at the Survey Research a matter of interpretation. "The
Center, said. He explained that lifficulty of interpretation arises
at present "it is being used main- from the fact that the analyst
1y for individual, rather than must distinguish between the vot-
organizational, research. er who, because of party identifi-
Tor ganizational, resdear ec-ation, rationalizes his choice, and
The ISR began conducting elec- the voter whose attitudes towards
tion studies in 1948. The study, the candidate actually determine
on a smaller scale, included only his choice," he added.
the post-election Deriod. Both pre- _

and post-election studies have
been conducted at each presiden-
tial election since 1952.

Panel Study
A panel study was conducted
during the 1956, 1958 and 1960
elections.
"The main purpose of that study
was to observe the interrelations
of political variables, stability of
attitudes and reliability of various
types of measures over a period of
time," Clausen said.
"Data from this study support-
ed the center's contention that
party affiliation adopted early in
one's political socializations was
stable throughout the elections."
The study for the 1964 elec-
tions consisted of interviews be-
for and after the election. Each
respondent was asked various
questions concerning such things
as party affiliation or feelings on
issues and national candidates.
Preliminary Analysis 1
"Preliminary analysis may re-
veal relationships between several
factors which could have affect-
ed the outcome," Clausen said. A
more exhaustive analysis is re-

Party Defections
The 1964 study will focus upon
party defections. Clausen noted
that it seemed apparent that in
this election individual party pre-
disposition was countered by oth-
er election variables. This counter
trend was evident where southern
Democrats voted for Goldwater
and northern Democrats voted for
Johnson.
"Our main interest in doing the
,esearch was long range," Clau-
sen said. "When an analysis of
this study, and earlier ones, has
been made it should be possible
;o expand and modify our under-
standing of electoral behavior."
"The final analysis may pro-
vide some further development
and modification of the Center's
work, as represented by The Amer-
Ican Voter by Angus Campbell,
Philip Converse, Warren Miller
and Donald StoRes," Clausen said.
1 Campaign Issues
It is often noted that people
tend to vote by personality. "In
the 1964 elections, from the data
thus far received, it seems as ifi
the candidate's position on issues,
rather than his personality, car-
ried the election," Clausen point-
ed out.
The civil rights issue was of
course important in the South,
but it was not the only issue of
interest," Clausen explained. They
were also concerned with social
reform and war and peace.
"During the 1964 election it ap-
pears that three times as many
people believed that the Demo-
crats, rather than the Republicans,
were more able to preserve the
peace. In 1960, the reverse was
true," Clausen said.
Dial 2-6264
Shows Start At
#1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00
Feature 5 minutes later

-Daily-Robert Sheffield
NEW JUDICIARY OFFICERS
The newly elected officers of Joint Judiciary Council
are (from left to right) Chairman Joel M. Bernstein, '66, Vice-
Chairman Barbara Stapp, '66 and Secretary Richard E. Zucker-'
man, '67. They received their positions on Thursday.
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT:
Tuskegee Association
Seeks Change by Ballot
(Continued from Page ) A 'TCA "Buy from your friends
hard to catch up. only" boycott sent 26 businesses
Gomillion also wants to de- into bankruptcy in the late 1950's
velop the economic independence during efforts in this direction.
of the Negro community, both 'Massive Education'
within and without. "There are Gomillion would also ilke to see
too many people who live in the a "massive re-education of white
present and won't save money," citizens about their civic respon-
he says, adding that he hopes sibilities in a democratic society,"
an area credit union will foster and says that "whites shouldn't
careful financial planning. be surprised that Negroes who get
More Self-Reliance a school four or five years after
He also would like tosee more whites do are not yet satisfied. We
self-reliance. "I see too many, have a tremendous backlog of
even among our own students at needs.,
Tuskegee, who are 'just sitting.' "Whites may say, 'Separate but
It's understandable, after the equal is best,' but right now we
years of such a hopeless environ- need freedom of association and
ment, but it's regrettable none- more t h a n equal treatment.
theless," he declares. Whites may say they're not re-
"Although equal pay is more or spon'ible for our plight, but we
less accepted now," he adds, "we feel that while they're unable to
will still have to work to get qual- undo entirely what their grand-
ified Negroes into jobs. Once they parents did years ago, they can
are hired, we will be concerned certainly try to improve the situ-
about equal advancement oppor- ation today," Gomillion said.
tunities." Tuskegee has had no TOMORROW: Thoughts on the
integrated commercial organiza- role of the University and the
tions, but several stores, owned by University student in the Tuske-
whites, have begun to hire Negroes gee Institute-University exchange
as clerks and sales personnel. program.

By SUSAN COLLINS
Plans for the School of Educa-
tion's student study tour to Eng-
land in May have developed to
where the school is offering four
weeks of education school study in
British schools for four full hours
of credit for $500.
The study program has been'
especially designed to handle a
greater number of students than
the 15 per semester who can take
part in the University's current
program with the University of
Sheffield, England. This lasts for
a full semester.
A cross section of 70 students
will take part in the study tour
program, Prof. Claude A. Eggert-
son of the School of Education,
originator of the tour idea, an-
nounced recently.
In London six members of the,

ver Education will be held in the
Rackham Lobby.
9:45 a.m.-Chief S. 0. Adebo,
Permanent Representative from
Nigeria to the United Nations,
will give the keynote address of
the United Nations Association
Conference at the Michigan Un-
ion.
'U' Resources
School Lauded
"The role of the school of nat-
ural resources at the University is
one of continuing intellectual lead-
ership in the national conserva-
tion movement and growing co-
ordination and cooperation with
other institutions in vocational
and professional training," Uni-

School of Education will direct ! versity President Harlan Hatcher
the activities of the students. The said.
students will be broken up into, He made this statement at the
groups of 15 to 18. recent honors convocation of the
One group will be especially school of natural resources.
concerned with the lower primary At the University," President
grades, another with the upper Hatcher said, "we think we have
primary, a third with language, a unique responsibility to con-
literature and social studies at tinue emphasis on natural re-
the secondary level, and a fourth source policy and management,
with science and mathematics at and on the combination of liberal
the secondary level, arts education with advanced pro-
A fifth group will be specifically fessional training."
concerned with special education; President Hatcher also noted
a sixth formed for graduate stu- that the state has two schools of
dents concerned with administra- forestry but only one of natural
tion and curriculum of British resources. The University's school

i

1 p.m.-The University Chapter 8:30 p.m.--The School of Music
of Friends of SNCC will hold an will present a recital by trumpet
organizational meeting for those and cornet students in the School
planning to be in Ann Arbor this of Music Recital Hall.
summer and anyone else interested SUNDAY, APRIL11
on the second floor of the SAB.
2 and 4:30 p.m.--The School of
4:15 p.m.-Hans Wallach of Music will present a recital by
Swarthmore College will speakC on trumpet and cornet students in
a subject to be announced in a the School of Music Recital Hall.
Department of Psychology col- 4:15 p.m.-The School of Music
loquium in Aud C. will present a recital by Robert
4:30 and 7 p.m.--The School of Courte, viola, and Lydia Courte,
Music will present recitals Dy piano, in the Rackham Lecture
Robert Clark, organist, in Organ Hall.
Stuaio 2110 of the School of Mu- 7 p.m.-Mary Lee Moore and
sic. Norman Hatter, SNCC members
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild w211 recently returned from Alabama,
present "Sunrise" at Arcnitecture will speak on "Black Belt Crisis,"
Aud. at the Presbyterian Campus Cen-
7:15 p.m.-The Indo-American ter, Curtis Room, 1431 Washtenaw.
Sports Association will present a 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
,novie, "Phir Ohi Dil Laya Hoon," present "Sunrise" at Architecture
with English subtitles. in Aud. A. Aud.
8 p.m. - 'ne Department of 8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
Speech 'university Players will will present the degree recital of
present Bertolt Brecht's "Galileo" Francea Whitcomb, flutist, in the
in Trueblood Aud. School of Music Recital Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music 8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a University Wood- will present the University Choir
wind Quintet Recital in the Rack- and Orchestra, conducted by
ham Lecture Hall. Thomas Hilbish. in Hill Aud.
FREE DELIVEERY
7 !
! THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
!U
!' Ph~one 7 100
I 0 FF on large,
one item pizza I
! !
Coupon Good Monday thru Thursday
! APRIL 12-APRIL 15
'rrrr mrmmrrruammm rrrrrrirrrrrrl . .rrrrrmmmmmmmm~w
* I
JANET GAYNOR in
Murnou's
.I
! !
JaetSUNRISE
JanetGaynor (winner of the first Academy Award)
and George O'Brien star in a psychological melo- ;
drama of sex and guilt, as a city woman attempts Iu
to seduce a young peasant.
! !
In SUNRISE, Murnau, a master of the silent film l
directors, combines the techniques that helped
earn his reputation.
U
Tonight and Tomorrow at 7 and 9
! !
* i
! !
AOM ISION: FIFTY CENTS
! ' aI
jm m mm mmm m m mm m mm m m m m m m m mm mm m m m m m mm mm m m mm m

-.4

i

£

'I

ji

HELD OVER
AGA I N !
(Through Wednesday)
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME !"
-Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
-New York Times
-x
JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
FRANCOISE DORLEAC
JEAN SERVAIS
Filmed in EASTMANCOLOR
Starts April 15th
Winner of 3
Academy Awards
"ZORBA
THE GREEK"

primary and secondary schools.~
Prof. Lionel H. Laing of the
Political Science department has
arranged for the students to visit
the House of Commons and the
London County Council.
Twelve speakers have agreed to
address evening seminars which
all the students will attend. Among
these speakers are Sir Ronald
Gould, Executive Secretary of the
National Union of Teachers in
England; Professor W. H. G.
Armytage of the University of
Sheffield; Tobias Weaver, Assis-
tant Secretary to the Ministry of
Education and Science; and Doug-
lass Foskett, the librarian of the
University of London's Institute
of Education.

of natural resources is the only
school of its kind in the country,
he added.
Recently there has been a grow-
ing measure of coordination
among the three institutions in
this state which offer courses in
forestry and related subjects,
President Hatcher said.
r

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:tr"DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN*
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DIXIELAND
"The New Wolverine
Joss Bond"
OLD HEIDELBERG
TONIGHT
A FEW SEATS
ARE LEFT O N
Michigan Union Flight 11
May 4-August 11
$265
Air France B. 707 Jet
Contact Michigan Union

I

I

I

The
unconventional
love affair
that began
at a convention
in New York

I

I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TVPhWRITThN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; lDay
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organizatpinotices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, APRIL 10
Day Calendar
Doctoral Examination for Richard
Nathaniel Faber, Philosophy; thesis:
"Category-Mistakes," today, 2213 An-
gell Hall, 2 p.m. Chairman, W. P.
Alston.
Doctoral Examination for Richard
Roby -r;ylo. Chemistry; thesis: "Nn-
saturated Cyclopropane Derivatives,"
today, 3003 Chemistry Bldg., 10:30 a.m.
Chairman, D. T .Longone.
Doctoral Examination for Frank Rob-
bins Bacon, Jr., Business Administra-
tion; thesis: "An Investigation of Tech-
noogical Change at the Firm Level,"
today, 516 Bus. Ad. Sch., 2 p.m. Co-
Chairmen,DuR. G. Cowan and A. W.
Swinyard.
Doctoral Examination for Leonard
Jay Lipkin, Mathematics; thesis: "Free
Boundary' Problems in the Calculus of
Variations," today, 4004 Angell Hal.
9 a.m. Chairman. Lamberto Cesart.
Astronomical Colloquium: Sat., April
10, 10-30 a.m.. 807 Physics-Astronomy
Bldg. Dr.dJorge Sahade, Universidad
Nacional de La Plata and Indiana Uni-
versity, "Comments on Close Binary
Systems"
Genera! Notices

tion Bldg., by noon, Thursday, April
29, 1965.
Attention Faculty Members Of: Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, School of Education, School of
Music, School of Public Health, and
School of Business Administration:
Students expecting degrees May 1, 1965,
are advised not to request grades of
I or X. When such grades are abso-
lutely imperative, the work must be
made up in time to allow you to re-
portthe make-up grade not later than
noon, Thurs., April 29, 1965.
Elizabeth A. Stewart Scholarship
(250): This award is offered to quali-
fied juniors and seniors who intend
to commit themselves to at least three
years of teaching. Applications are
available in 2509 UES until April 13.
Spring-Summer Early Registration:
Early registration will continue through
April 16. All students currently en-
rolled who plan on taking courses in
the Spring-Summer (III) or Spring
Half (I11A) terms should make ar-
rangements to be counselled now. The
May 3 and 4 registration will be for
new and readmitted students only.
Spring Meeting: The regular spring
meeting of the University Senate will
be held Mon., April 12 at 4:15 p.m.
in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Applicants for the Joint Program in
Liberal Arts and Medicine or Dentistry:
Juniors or seniors planning to apply
for admission to the Joint Program in
Liberal Arts and Medicine or Dentistry
must submit their formal application
'to 1220 Angell Hall before Fri., April
16.
Lectureships Available under the Ful-
bright-Hays Act as of April 1, 1965 are
listed by the Committee on Interna-
tional Exchange of Persons. A copy of
the list may be consulted in the
Graduate Fellowship Office, 110 Rack-
ham Bldg.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
5 the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has be-
come effective.
Approval request forms for student-
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Voice Political Party, Panel discus-
sion on ERAP, 7:30 p.m., Multipurpose
Room, April 7.
Economics Society, Speaker, Dr. Haus
W. Singer, April 9, 4-6 p.m., Multipur-

I

laeart
A MARTIN MANUUS Production
COStarrn5 BARBAR~A NICHOLS
PATRICIA BARRY \CHARLES DRAKE and
A O6E[A LASBURY

pose Room, UGLI.
Indo-American Sports
Movie, "Phid Wohi Dil
April 10, 7:30 p.m., Angell

Association,
Laya Hoon,
Hall, Aud. A.

Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Reliable Linen Co., Detroit - Plant
Manager. Immed. opening for man to
supv. 200 employes. IE bkgd. pref. Sev-
eral yrs. bus. exper. High mech. apti-
tude. Age 25-40.
Medical Research Computer Center,
Ann Arbor-Various openings includ-
ing 1. Accountant, BBA, minor in ac-
ctg, mi. 2. Statisticians, BA or MA in
math, statistics or public health. 3.
Systems Analyst or Programmers for
systems layout, form. des., & writing
programs. 4. File Supervisor, lib. exper.
helpful. Also med. records personnel &
stenographers.
Detroit Retail Organization-Inven-
tory Control Specialist, BS, BA, Bus.
Ad., Indust. Engrg .or Econ. Pref. ex-
per. in systems & procedures, will con-
sider honor grad student. Age 24-35.
Install & monitor inventory system in
store & warehouse depts.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Jobs for Students 2nd half of sum-
mer. Students going to first 8 week
session come in and see listing of all
camps starting June 27 or later.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * .
Lutheran Student Chapel (National
Lutheran Council), Worship, Sun., April
11, 9:30 and 11 a~n. (Holy Communion,
11 a.m.); Sunday evening program, 7
p.m., Lutheran Student Center, 801 S.
Forest.
* * *
U. of M. Rifle Club, Meeting, elec-
tion of officers and discussion of fu-
ture plans, Sun., April 11, 2 p.m.,
Rifle Range.

U of M FOLK
FESTIVAL
TODAY and TOMORROW

saturday 1 :00 p.m.
WORKSHOP
SAB free

saturday 3:00 p.m.
DANNY KALB
aud. A angell hall $1 .00

saturday night 8:00 p.m.
HOOTENANNY with RAY TATE
lydia mendelssohn theatre $1..50
sunday afternoon 2:00 p.m.
STU RAMSAY and his BLUEGRASS BOYS
aud A, angell hal f$1.00
tickets: herb david's, discount records, disc shop, union desk.

GEMW

Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 P.M.
Feature 15 Minute,, Later

Also at the door

Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative May graduates
from the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts, for honors or high
honors should recommend such stu-
dents by forwarding a letter to the
Director, Honors Council, 1210 Angell
Hall, before noon, Thurs., April 29,
1965.
Teaching departments in the SchoolE
of Education should forward letters di.
rectly to the Office of Registration
and Records, Room 1513 Administra-

F

kr""M T ~ fi ""s~s... _.. .. " ..
R-icAHUDSON -Gina 0LWBIGIDA
GigYOUNG
STIANGE BEDFELLOWS"
..........'CH............

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