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March 28, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-28

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SUNDAY, 28 MARCH 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIM

SUNDAY, 28 MARCH 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

MURDER CHARGE EXPECTED:
Agents Collect

Alternate China Policy Urewd

By The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. - State
agents, ordered into round-the-
clock action by Gov. George C.
Wallace, worked yesterday in pre-
paring possible murder charges in
the highway slaying of a Detroit
mother who joined a civil rights

march to the Alabama capital.
Meanwhile, in related events:
-Alabama leaders of the Ku
Klux Klan declared that the FBI'
had tried to bribe a klansman
charged with conspiracy in the
death of Mrs. Viola Gregg Liuzzo,
white mother of five from Detroit;

DESPITE HOUSE ACTION:
Flanders Sees Threats
To Education Bill Passage

(Continued from Page 1)
subcommittee finishes investiga-
tion and the bill is brought to
' the floor. He said that "this is the
time to write," while the educa-
tion bill is still under considera-
tion and while senators still can
be"persuaded to vote for it.
Flanders especially urged that
citizens write to conservative Re-
publican senators.
Flanders said Washtenaw Coun-
ty would be most directly affected
by the first title of the education
bill. Under that title, the county's
needy children would receive
$445,898, according to estimates
of the subcommittee on education
of the Senate Committee on Labor
and Public Welfare.
Flanders described many of the
schools of Washtenaw County be-
ing "almost eroded until inade-
quate."hThe education bill could
help those school districts which
have been unable to pass millage
or bond issues to supply enough
funds for increasing enrollment,
he said.
If the bill is passed, it will be

the first time in several decades
that many of the county schools
will have some extra money, he
said.
Flanders said that the other
areas of the bill would provide
more indirect help by distributing
the aid over larger geographic
areas. He said the development of
educational research centers will
have an especially important im-
pact.
The money for research is long
overdue, Flanders stressed. He said
it will stimulate school board
members to recognize the need for
improving present programs and
developing new ones, rather than
being concerned only with build-
ings, salaries, and the mainten-
ance of minimal educational
standards.
Flanders said that, along with
the increase for educational re-
search over last year from $17~
million to $25 millionin the fed-
eral budget, the $45 million set
aside by the new education bill
could set a good example for
evaluating a n d experimenting
with new ideas in education.

II (nece (ni tinued from Page 1
Admission of Communist China
to the UN, felt more inclined to
-In Washington, several Re- keep the basic U.S. strategy, but
publicans rallied behind President also recognized some need for
Lyndon B. Johnson's plans to curb adjustments in policy.
klan activities, and 'Democratic I-Te Chen, president of the
leaders predicted swift action on United Formosans for Independ-
any proposed legislation; ence, discussed the need for a re-
Romney Declares valuation of the U.S. role in For-
-In Lansing, Gov. George Rom- mosa, which all of the speakers
ney declared a state of mourning agreed is the key to a solution of
Monday and Tuesday in Michigan, U.S.-Chinese relations.
and Chen, whose group is composed
-In Selma, more than 200 white of students in the U.S. "seeking
and Negro demonstrators, mostly the establishment of a free, demo-
young people, marched to the cratic Formosa," said "there is no
county courthouse and to city hall legal or historical basis for Chi-
to show their resentment over the nese control of Formosa."
slaying of Mrs. Liuzzo, in the first Chiang Kai-shek.
street demonstration there since He saidth Nainst goen
th startdeonstat5-inetmer iceHo e said the Nationalist govern-
the start of a 50-mile march to ment of Chiang Kai-shek imposed.
Montgomery last Sunday. martial law in 1948, suspending
Attorney Matt H. Murphy Jr., elections while it waited to re-
klan lawyer, said at a news con- cover the mainland. "Recovery is
ference yesterday that the FBI an impossibility," said Chen. The
offered Gary Tommy Rowe Jr., 34, last elections were held in 1948,
of Birmingham, 580 acres of land and the men elected then, almost
in Minnesota if he would give all Chinese, still hold office, he
- them information in the murder added.
case. Chen said he favored a vote for
Rowe was among four klansmen the people of Formosa to decide
arrested by the FBI on conspiracy whether to return to the main-
charges in the killing Thursday land or form another government.
night of Mrs. Liuzzo. Rowe said that under the Na-
Will Be Exonerated tionalist government a land re-
"The four boys will be exonerat- form program has been enacted,
ed," Murphy said. while other Asian nations have
Robert M. Shelton Jr. of Tus- been unsuccessful in that field.
caloosa, Imperial Wizard of .the Yet, Chen asserted that the Chi-
United Klans, told newsmen that nese Nationalist government had
the klan posted $150,000 bond for only been able to pass the program
1 three of the men, because "they weren't the land-
"We've had these trumped up owners. It was easy for the Chi-
charges by the federal government nese to divide the Formosans'
before," said Shelton. land. They tried it in China
7 Two GOP Senators and 21 house_
-members endorsed the President's
condemnation of the klan and Wrk1 N ei4
[ indicated support of his pending
request for legislation and his ~
*suggestion for congressional in-
vestigation.
By The Asso
SAIGON-The Vietnamese g
had eliminated martial law throug
EK IN REVIEW Saigon's nighttime curfew by on
effect almost continuously since th
The lifting of martial law pre
longer have military governors.1
H e m. Viet Nam are occupied by militar
u b ta
JONESBORO, La.-In an ext
macy, Gov. John J. Mckeithen f
halt a three-week old boycott at
French Triumph Mckeithen arrived amidst rep
If France scored another triumph would have to be met or demonst
over the United States this week be stepped up.
o with the announcement from Vi-
e enna of a joint French-Soviet DAMASCUS, Syria-Army offi-'
r agreement to pool efforts in or- cials from Arab countries border-
o der to develop a color television ing Israel have laid down "a uni-
e system for Europe. This announce- fied plan for concerted Arab ac-
, mpnt jut nrinr tn. U pinnnan ilin the Oeveto f r dnra,, hne-

where they were landowners and
failed."
Porter said that U.S. support
for the Nationalist government is
comporable to that of "Russia's
support of the East German pup-
pet state." Chen said "America's
commitment kept the Communists
out, but we object to aid given
t h e Nationalist government."
Rowe said that if the government
is dong what "we wish-we should
keep it there."
Porter said that instead of sup-
porting totalitarian governments,
we should just recognize them
(including Communist China) but
only give support. to democratic
governments.
In deciding whether or not to
recognize Communist China, Por-
ter said we should do so only if
it is in the national interest to do
so. Rowe also said we should act
"selfishly" in national interest; but
he reached a different conclusion.
Rowe went back to 1950, at
which time he said the U.S. "was
prepared to let Formosa go," and
was even ready to recognize
China. "The Chinese leaders ap-
parently did not want that," pos-
sibly because they felt it would
be a sign of weakness, Rowe said.
Therefore they harried our dip-
lomats, which discouraged the
U.S. until "the Korean War made
recognition impossible," he added.
Porter said that several prepa-
ratory steps were needed before
China could be taken into the
United Nations. These steps in-
clude a Senate hearing on China,
which Porter said he had been
trying to get for years, bringing
the UN into South Viet Nam, oust-
ing Chiang Kai-shek, evacuating
vs Roundup
ciated Press
overnment announced yesterday it
ghout the nation and was reducing
ie hour. Martial law has been in
ae Gulf of Tonkin crisis last August.
esumably will-mean regions will no
But most administrative posts in
-y officers anyway.
a *
raordinary move of personal diplo-
lew here today in an attempt to
all-Negro Jackson High School.
ports that demands for integration
trations in the town of 4000 would

the offshore island, removing the
7th fleet from their patrol posi-
tion between China and Formosa,
stopping air flights over China
and relaxing trade and travel re-
trictions.
He called the bases "obsolete,"
the flights, ships and bases "ag-
gressive against China" and the
restrictions on travel as unneces-
sary. "We should be communicat-
ing with China," he added.
He said congressmen have not
acted on this because "they are
afraid of reprisals back home"
from people who remember the
Korean War. That is why they
put their names on lists like the
One Million (the group Rowe rep-
resents).
"Almost all the experts agree-
drastic change is needed," Porter
said.
Weapons Spur
Red Economy,
MOSCOW (AP)-Despite Kremlin
talk of emphasizing consumer
goods and raising the Soviet
standard of living, the men who
have made weapons as careers
continue to direct the economy.
The chairman of the Supreme
National Economic Council whose
appointment was announced in
yesterday's newspapers, Vladimir
T. Novikov, made his reputation
making armaments during World
War II
He succeeded Dmitry F. Ustinov,
who was Stalin's appointee to run
defense industries when Hitler in-
vaded in 1941. Novikov, then 33,
became Ustinov's deputy in 1941.
The changes were decided upon
by the Central Comhittee of the
Soviet Communist Party and then
ratified by the top committee of
the Soviet Parliament.
The posts of Leonid Brezhnev as
Party First Secretary and Alexei
Kosygin as Premier were unaffect-
ed by decisions at the Central
SCommittee's three-day meeting
that ended Friday.
Ustinov gave up his rank as a
first deputy premier to move into
party work. Since the party gives
orders to the government, Ustinov
apparently will continue to have
}a large voice in the economy.
The Central Committee adopted
far-reaching proposals of Brezh-
nev's to increase agricultural in-
centives and investments in a
long-term effort to overcome
Soviet farm problems.

.1

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I,,

A Series of
LAST CHANCE LECTURES
John Jay MANNING
administrative assistant
HENDERSON ROOM
LEAGUE
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31
4:15
sponsored by UAC

_ _ _. ___._..._ r iii

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By ARTHUR COLLINGSWORTH
While the controversy over U.S.
policy in Viet Nam continued to
rage throughout this country, do-
mestic problems appeared to di-
vert the world's attention.
Space achievements, a by-elec-
tion in England, a French-Soviet
coalition to introduce color tele-
vision in Europe, and anti-Amer-
ican activity in Indonesia high-
lighted the week.
The Cosmonauts . . .
A speech by Leonid I. Brezhnev,
first secretary of the Communist
Party Central Committee, hon-
oring the Soviet cosmonauts in
Red Square, illustrated the ef-
fective propaganda base provided
by recent Soviet space achieve-
ments.
Such statements as, "The thun-
der of powerful rockets, throwing
upward the Voskhod II spaceship,
resounded like the first salute of
our homeland to the forthcoming
twentieth anniversary of the great
victory over fascism" set the tone
of Brezhnev's subsequent remarks.
"The cosmonauts say that when
seen from outer space the earth
seems to be peaceful, surrounded
by a peaceful bluish haze. But,
actually, our planet is not all that
Ipeaceful.
"Seats of dangerous conflicts
created by imperialists appear now
in one place, then in another," he
Pdeclared.
Signs of the Sino-Soviet rift
were evident toward the end of
the speech. "The will of their par-
ties for the cohesion of all Com-
munists for the sake of the great
ideals of the working class has
been expressed by the representa-
tives of 19 Communist and Work-
ers' Parties, who attended the re-
cent consultative meeting in Mos-
cow. This meeting has been an
important event in the world Coi-
Co-munist movement."
Are these two statements to be
interpreted as an official acknowl-
edgement that Soviet hegemony
in the Communist world has been
reduced to only those nations
which were represented at the
recent Moscow meeting? Further-
more, how does the lack of unity
of those participating in the meet-
ing mark an important event in
the Communist movement? observ-
ers ask.
British By-Election . .
In Great Britain the Labor Par-
ty noted slight gains in a by-

election in Saffron Walden, a tra-
ditionally Conservative, and main-
ly agricultural district north of
London.
The election was held in order to
fill the vacancy created by the
elevation of R. A. Butler, former
Conservative foreign secretary, t
the House of Lords. Although the
Conservatives retained possession
of the House of Commons seal
from that area, their vote strength
declined about two per cent from
last fall's general election.
If this two per cent increase in
support for the Labor Party may
be interpreted as a typical sam-
ple of British feelings, it may
have far reaching implications for
.the present government.
A swing of two per cent ina
new general election to Labor
would substantially increase the
government's slim majority o
three in the House of Commons
But it is doubtful if Prime Min
ister Harold Wilson will feel con
fident enough at this time to take
the risk of going to the polls in
a national election. Special fac
tors at Saffron Walden migh
have been responsible for the La
bor upsurge.
Indonesian Relations..
U.S.-Indonesian relations con
tinued to decline with the govern
ment announcement of the seizure
of an American-owned rubber fac-
tory and a mail-and-telegrap
boycott imposed on the U.S. Em
bassy by the Communist Posta
Workers Union.
These are the latest in a serie
of anti-American moves bein
waged by the Indonesian Commu
nist Party.
In an effort to improve the de
teriorating relations between thi
two countries, President Lyndo:
B. Johnson has dispatched Ells
worth Bunker to Jakarta as a spe
cial envoy to consult with Presi
dent Sukarno.

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meat, jst, pr ior o a vienna con-
ference dealing with the course of
the lucrative consumer market,r
was interpreted as a major eco-
nomic coup by France. This joint
effort will probably present ma-
jor problems for a system propos-
ed by the Radio Corporation of
America, as well as a dark-horse
system developed by West Ger-
many.
Although it is quite possible that
the Vienna negotiations will not
reach a common solution, it is ex-
pected that the French will not
yield to an American system now.'
Whether other participants in the
conference will yield to France or
other systems developed in Europe,
remains to be seen.
Aside from its economic ramifi-
cations, it marks a new milestone
in the growing cordiality of Paris-
Moscow relations.

4u11 IMl ile eve oU renewe los-
tilities with Israel," it was offi-
cially announced here yesterday.
The plan was not made public, but
the announcement said it would
be submitted to the unified Arab
high command in Cairo and the
Arab league for approval.
* *

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

1 I

MONDAY NOON LUNCH 25c.
IAT ARE THE PROBLEMS
OF THE PRESS TODAY?"
of. William Porter, Dept. of Journalism

.J a. hri

WASHINGTON -- Sen. Everett
M. Dirksen (R-Ill) predicted yes-
terday the administration's vot-
ing-rights bill will come out of
the Senate judiciary committee
without major changes, possibly
before an April 9 deadline.
* * *
BONN, Germany - Chancellor
Ludwig Erhard risked collapse of
his coalition government yester-
day by appointing a member of
his own Christian Democratic
Party West Germany's new jus-
tice minister.

we .Steuen
of Ann Arbo,

in c.

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