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March 23, 1965 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-23

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, 23 MARCH 1965,_

PAGESIXTHEMICIGA DALY TESDY. 3 MRCH1s6

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Michigan's

Cat

Ha

By RICK FEFERMAN
This cat had only eight lives.
Eight times this season the
Michigan cagers entered the
dressing room at halftime faced
with a deficit. Eight times, when
they returned after the final
buzzer, there was another Michi-
gan victory in the win column.
But they had ONLY eight lives.
For the first 10 minutes Satur-
day the Wolverines looked un-
beatable, as they roared from P
four point deficit to a seven point
lead at 20-13.
"Seven points doesn't mean s
lot, as we well know," said Coach
Dave Strack yesterday, obvious-

ly referring to Michigan's eight
come-from-behind victories this
season.
What became more significant
at this stage of the game was
that Michigan was deviating from
its pre-game plan. "We had hop-
ed to substitute more frequently
to rest our men against the
press," said Strack. "If you get
tired and make one mistake, you
begin to worry and then make
more errors."
This is precisely what happen-
ed. "Their press forced us into
a number of errors which they
capitalized on; we just had toc
many turnovers," analyzed Strack
From seven points behind the

Uclans surged to within a sin-
gle point, 22-21. This was to be
the last lead for the Wolverines
as UCLA stole the ball again and
went ahead for good. A Bill Bun-
tin tip-in tied it at 24-all, but
the Bruins spurted to a 47-34
halftime advantage, includirv
eight straight points at the en,1
of the half.
"Actually, we stayed close un-
til their spurt just at the end,'
commented Strack. "But the game
went so quickly we didn't have
time to substitute."
As a consequence, when UCLA
brought Kenny Washington off
the bench, he was able to out-
leap the taller Wolverines, who
were tiring from the. Bruins' zone
press.
What can you tell a team that
is behind by 13 points at the half?
"We still felt we had a chance
to win. We knew we had to get
on the boards stronger, hit their

Oinly
couldn't dribble by it, becausE
everywhere they turned there was
a Uclan in their path; in the
end, they were squeezed up by it
UCLA was biding its time on!
offense, waiting for the sure shot;
which would be taken by the dart-j
ing phantom Gail Goodrich, who

Eight

Lives'

PETITIONING NOW OPEN
FOR
GARGOYLE
Senior and Junior Staff
Positions
Information may be obtained
in the Student Publications
Building.

Freshman Track
All freshmen who are inter-
ested in going out for the
freshman track team should
come to a meeting Wednesday
in the 'M' Club Room, Yost
Field House, at 4 p.m.
invariably found himself at thE
foul line. And his shots invariably
found themselves on the score-
board. Twelve of 22 from the
field, 18 out of 20 from the line;
iand an amazing 27 points in the'
second half for the All-American.

II

LLOYD GRAFF

'The Best of the Best
Won in Portland
The two best teams in the country played in Portland and the
best of the best won.
UCLA liad everything: shooting, speed, defense, rebounding,
depth, and perhaps most important, unswerving confidence. The
Bruins always thought they were the champs. "I knew we were going
to win- it," said a glowing Gail Goodrich after the game.
"Sure, they were hitting beautifully there at the start. But, I
knew that they couldn't keep that up, and I could see that our press
and speed were going to bother them."
The press and speed weren't all that bothered the Wolverines.
Goodrich, himself, was a plague that made the Michigan defense look
sick. Atter UCLA got ahead, their offensive strategy was simple: get
the ball to Gail and let him bounce around till he scored.
The senior from Hollywood could be cast in a movie as William
Tell the way he can shoot, but he hit baskets, not apples against
Michigan.
Poor George Pomey had the honor of covering All-Americans
back to back. George took Bill Bradley Friday, holding him to 29, and
Goodrich for an encore, Saturday. This is like being served cyanide
'for breakfast, and arsenic for lunch. Pomey is probably the only
person in college basketball history to allow opponents 71 points in
two games and still be considered one of the better defensive players
in collegiate ranks.
Ponley's plight pointed up how impossible it is for even a great
defensive player to stop'a superb offensive player of comparable size
except by flattening him with a punch before the tipoff.
Goodrich's fakes and changes of pace on the dribble were too
much for Pomey, just as they have been too much for anyone who
has guarded him. Bradley had as good a jump shot as anyone I've
ever seen and that includes Oscar Robertson and Jerry West.
Bradley did have a flaw as a player, however. He didn't shoot
enough. With the mediocrity on his team he should have fired at
least fifty per cent of the Princeton shots rather than the one-third he
took. Bradley could have scored 70 against Wichita if he had shot
more in the first half. He only picked up 19 in that stanza, getting
39 in the second while hitting 16 straight in a three minute stretch.
He swished 22 of 29 from the field and 14 of 15 from the line. If he
hadn't passed up so many shots in the first half and shot maybe
eight more times he would have gotten 70. Wichita had nobody who
could even keep a hand in his face, much less block his shots.
It was sad to see a team of Wichita's caliber in the tournament.
Without Dave Stallworth and Nate Bowman the Shockers had nobody
taller than 6'5" in the lineup. They would have had trouble finishing
seventh in the Big Ten with the team that played in Portland.
Will the Dynasty End?
One of the most disheartening things about UCLA is that there's
no end in sight for Wooden's Wonders. This team loses Goodrich and
center Keith Erickson, who hardly played in the tournament because
of a muscle pull. Edgar Lacey, Freddy Goss, Doug McIntosh, Mike
Lynn, and of course Kenny Washington will be back to run opponents
into the ground again next season. As if this isn't enough, Mike
Warren, a high school All-American guard from South Bend, Ind.,
has Bruin fans buzzing already.
Amazing as it may sound, Washington could be the best sixth'
man in college basketball for a third straight year. But if Kenny is
disturbed about not starting Michigan would love to see him transfer
to Ann Arbor.
The 6'3" 175 pounder from Beaumont, S.C., is 21, but he looks
like a tall 11-year-old. When I saw him sitting in the crowd with
UCLA I thought maybe he was Freddy Goss' kid brother.
But what a pressure player. He turned a scrambling UCLA team
into a .swarm of }fall hawking locusts who seemed to devour every

I.

press better, and improve our Squelched!
shooting," revealed Strack. Under Goodrich's generalship.
But implementing their knowl- the Bruins romped to a 20-poin
edge was quite a different matter lead, 71-51. Then the miracle men
Michigan still had to contend with from Michigan began their pat-
that harassing full court press ented rally. The Blue closed the
administered by those f I v e gap to 71-58 with seven consec-
ball-hawking Bruins from the utive points. Another steal, ahead!
West coast. to Darden, cut the lead to 11 ...
Rally Needed Travelling. The ninth life wa,
As the second half opened, the nipped in the bud.
big question was whether the Wol- Armchair experts were far!
verines could come up with the from satisfied with Michigan's
rally they needed to get back into performance, but Strack was a bit,
the game. They couldn't. The more realistic. "You can't criti-
zone press completely cracked the cize the team with me," he said.I
Wolverines' composure. "We played as hard as we had
They couldn't pass around it, all year long. Of course, we werf
because now their long passes disappointed that we didn't go aT
were being snapped up by the the way. But you have to remem-
eager hands of Bruin sophomor{ ber that it's a hard job to get{
forward Edgar Lacey; and they into the final four."
OFFENSIVE BACKFIELD:

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
Darden Elected Captain

Ii :Z:.'Ii

4..1

~flI

Oliver Darden, who earned a
permanent starting berth with his
25-point outburst last season
against UCLA and pumped in 17
Saturday night in the national
championship game, was elect-
ed captain of the 1965-66 basket-?
ball team yesterday in a vote of
the team.

new captain follows in the foot-
steps of all three current Michi-
gan coaches, as well as Pete El-
liott, Ron Kramer, Bob Cantrell
John Tidwell and a host of other
greats through the years.
Darden is from Detroit's North-
western High School and is ma-

Already looking forward to next joring in history with ambitions
season, the 6'7" junior says "We to teach history, or go into in-
were third last year; second this dustry.
year; and next year we'll be The high point of Darden's ca-
after the national title." reer came in the victory over
Darden averaged 12.6 this sea- Purdue at Yost Field House this
son and has ranked second in season when he shattered the
rebounding and third in scoring I Boilermakers' defense hitting for
both seasons he has played. 27 points,' mostly on long, ac-
Replacing Larry Tregoning, the curate jumpers.

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Loss of Timberlake, Anthony Leaves Void

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first of a series of articles analyz-
ing the strengths and weaknesses
of the 1965 Michigan footballteam.
Today's article deals with the
offensive backfield.)
By HOWARD BOIGON {
As s p r i n g football practice
enters its second week, Coach
Bump Elliott is faced with two
m a j o r problems: Ann Arbor
weather and graduating letter-
men.
Yost Field House has provided
the solution to the first problem,
if such can be called a solution,
but the second is not quite as
easily solved.
Typical of the holes left in the
squad by the loss of the seniors
are those in the offensive back-
field where All-American quarter-
back Bob Timberlake and fullback
Mel Anthony leave huge gaps to
There are bright spots, however.
Returning at the halfback slots
are sophomores Carl Ward and
Jim Detweiler, while Dave Fisher,
also a sophomore, who played be-
hind Anthony, is currently holding
the top spot at fullback.
Question Mark
The big question mark is at
quarte,.back. As matters stand

now, Dick Vidmer and Wally Gab-,
ler are vying for the position, and
right now there is considerable'
doubt as to who holds the upper
hand.
Vidmer, a sophomore, was high-'
ly touted last fall, but he tore
some ligaments in his leg before
the season opened, and was side-
lined for !he year. "His leg is
pretty good now," said Fonde, "but
he is still not a hundred per cent
fit." Up to row, Vidmer has been
quarterbacking the offensive team
in practice.
The other candidate, Wally
Gabler, is a junior with almost
"two years more playing exper -
ience," according to Fonde, and
who did see some action last year.
He has not been hampered by any
injuries, and has been quarter-I
backing the defensive team on of-

fensef
The rest of the backfield is
bolstered by returning lettermenc
and by some highly regardedI
freshmen. At halfback, J a c ki
Clancy, out with a back injuryt
last season, is the top man behind
Ward and Detweiler. although he
is not out for spring practice.
Although a junior, Clancy has
two more years of eligibility.
John Rowser, who was starting
halfback until sidelined by a knee
injury last year, has no.t been
given permission to go out for
spring ball, and Fonde is not sure
whether he will be used on of-
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
BOB CARNEY{

fense or defense next fall.
The top freshman halfback
candidate is Ernie Sharpe, with
Don Witt and Doug Nelson also
in the running. These three are
the "farthest advanced" says
Fonde.

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11

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If you are free from 6 p.m, to 10 p.m. four evenings each week end
occasionally on Saturday, you can maintain your studies and still enjoy
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If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
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We are also interested in full-time employment.

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11

SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Cincinnati 2, Baltimore 1
Houston 7, New York (A) 4
Milwaukee 6, Los Angeles (N) 1
Kansas City 4, Los Angeles (N) "B" 1
New York (N) 6, Pittsburgh U
Philadelphia z, Chicago (A) 1
Minnesota 4, St. Louis 3
San Francisco 3, Cleveland 3 (13 inn)
(tie, agreement)
Boston 9. Los Angeles (A) 7
Washington 3, Detroit 1

loose ball. He made the Bruin
press deadly and he gave zip to a
sputtering offense. His rebounding
helped neutarilze Michigan's ad-
vantage off the boards.
With, this personnel, if John
Wooden lures Lew Alcindor to the
Coast-and he's in there fighting
-he could collect enough NCAA
winner's watches to start a jewelry
store.
But remember, Michigan was
third last year, and second this
time. If Craig Dill eats enough
ice cream, Ollie shoots more, and
Cazzie is still Cazzie but more
so, well, yotr never know.
The Dodgers finally did it.

- ~--.--_ _ _d

SPOTTED?

11

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at the SCHWABEN INN
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