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March 23, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, 23 MARCH 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILX

PAGE TIME;'

TUSAI2 AC 95TEM~IA AL AETRJ

_. r .. ,

Rights Marchers Step Up
Pace, Leave Dallas County]

Sky Clears; Give Okay
For U.S. Two-Man Flight

By The Associated Press
SELMA-Three hundred march-
ers stepped up the pace of their
50-mile right-to-vote trek to Ala-
bama's capital yesterday and
crossed into Lowndes County, de-
scribed once by a Negro leader
as "worse than hell."

Rev Martin Luther King, Jr.
led his weary civil rights pil-
grims doggedly along U.S. 80,
which narrowed to two lanes at
the Dallas-Lowndes county line.
Leroy Collins, director of the
Federal Community Relations
Service, also joined the marchers.

The campsite for the second
night of the march was a pasture
about one mile from Big Swamp
Creek, still ahead of the march-
ers. The site is about 25 miles
east of Selma.
Federalized National Guards-
men in battle fatigues and Army
military police escorted the march.
Helicopters and the drone of Ar-
my reconnaisance planes accom-
panied the procession.
Find Another Bomb
In Birmingham, police found
still another 'bomb in a Negro
area. The deadly dynamite time
bomb was the sixth discovered
since Sunday morning in pre-
dominantly Negro neighborhoods.
Army experts disarmed all the
bombs. None of them exploded.
And Alabama legislators at
Montgomery considered calling t
legal holiday Thursday to shut
down the capital in advance of
King's arrival. This would be
aimed at protesting the march.
In Washington
Meanwhile, in Washington,
Senate leader Everett M. Dirk-
sen (R-Ill) served notice yester-
day that if President Johnson's
voting rights bill is not passed by
April 15, the senators will for-
feit their Easter recess.

CAPE KENNEDY (P) - Three
days of overcast skies thinned and
aroke up yesterday, apparently
clearing the way for today's
scheduled five-hour dashinto
space by two U.S. astronauts and
the space capsule they call "Molly
Brown."~
The seven-hour countdown -
for the scheduled 9 a.m. (EST)
blastoff-began at 2 am. with
the astronauts due on board the
spacecraft-just 100 minutes before
launch time.
As if part of the countdown,
high altitude winds began to blow
from the southwest to disperse
cloud cover that has hung over
the launch area and dampened
flight plans with cold and spor-
adic showers.
Well Within Limits
Even the outlook for sea weath-!
er improved. Expected conditions
in the prime and secondary land-
ing areas in the Atlantic were
well within the limits of cloud
ceiling, visibility, wind and wave
levels.
The weather requirements for
this first flight of Americans in a
two-man spaceship are much more
relaxed than the rigid conditions
necessary for the launching and
recovery of the one-man Mer-
cury capsules.
Air Force Map. Virgil I. Gris-
son, the Gemini command poliot,

and Navy Lt. Cmdr. John W.
Young, co-pilot, will be the first
U.S. astronauts into space since
LeroyrGordon Cooper, Jr., anoth-
er Air Force major, ended the
Mercury program with a 22-or-
bit, 34-hour flight, May 15, 1963.
Less Breathless
The atmosphere of the Cape
was decidedly less breathless than!
in the days preceding the Mer-
cury shots.
Most of the change was due to
the heightened confidence of the
space officials, and the advanced
design of the Gemini spacecraft
and the Titan II rocket which are
both easier to prepare and repair
than the more complex Mercury-
Atlas systems,
Space officials said they would
make their final decision to go or
not to go two hours and 50 min-
utes before the scheduled blast-
off at 9 a.m.
Even then, they might decide tc
hold up the countdown at that
point and wait until weather im-
proves.
It was a calculated risk against
the imponderable weather that
has always been a space flight
problem.
If the shot fails to go off to-
day, space officials said it would
be at least 48 hours before they
could try again. Time is heeded
to drain the fuel and cleanse the
tanks of the rocket.

Segregation.
Plays Role in
Village Split
(Continued from Page 1)
eligible for surplus food. He said
60 families were receiving Aid to
Denendent Children.
Willow Village is almost totally
racially segregated: of the five
subdivisions in the Village, two are
100 per cent Negro, one is 100 per
cent white, one is 99 per cent
white and the fifth is 70 per cent
Negro. The white neighborhoods
lie in Ypsilanti Township for the
most part, and the Negroes live
in Superior Township.
J. C. Rutherford, WRAND board
member and president of the Wil-
low Run branch of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People, said that he is
certain that race has crept into
the issue, but "couldn't say to
what extent."
Mrs. Gerald Post, a Ypsilanti
Township trustee, said that some
of the opposition to the project
may involve race. "There's more
to the protest than meets the eye,"
she said. "I think underneath
there is a fear it will be turned
into an integration problem."
The Ypsilanti Township resi-
dents are the most disturbed over
the grant and the ILIR report.
"No one came to my door and
asked me if I was poverty-strick-
(Continued on Page 5)

I

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FOR LO ! and HARK!
There will be a
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Staff Meeting !
(Yes! And it will be Wednesday
night the 24th, no less-at
7:00 in the P.M.)
At the Stud. Pub., of course!

-Associated Press

FLAG - BEARING FREEDOM MARCHERS shown here near
Selma, Ala., moved along Route 80 towards Montgomery, Ala-
bama's capital, accompanied by troops called up by President
Lyndon B. Jdinson. Today is the third day of the march.

ANALYSIS:
Arab-Israeli^Tension Endangers Peace

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first, of a two-part series aalyz-
ing the current Arab-Israeli crisis.
By JOSHUA BARLEV
The Middle East is again the
scene of a tense situation which
threatens to explode into a ma-
jor conflict with significant bear-
ing on world peace.
The opponents, as before, are
Israel and the Arab nations, back-
ed by support from either West-
ern nations or the Communist
bloc.
Israel has strong ties with
France and Great Britain, and to
a lesser degree with the U.S.
Egypt and hereallies can expect
aid from the Soviet Union.
Enough Support
Enough support is available tc
makeua large-scale war possible
if conditions remain as they are
Recent incidents involving West
Germany's recognition of Israel
have only served to accent a
situation which has already exist-
ed for 17 years.
8000 Square Miles
Israel is a country of approxi-
mately 8000 square miles, with a
population of over two and a half
million people, most of whom are
immigrants who established per-
manent residence in the new stat
after the independence war of
1948.
The Arabs have always main-
tained that they were the first
ones there, and therefore have
the right to exclude any group
such as the Jewish immigrants,
from establishing homes within
their boundaries.
'Promised Land'
Since Bihlieal timrns Trel has
always been the "Promised Land"
for the Jews. Through the count-
less exiles, inquisitions and per-
secutions of the centuries, the
Zionist idea was only nurtured
and strengthened. The Jews re-
ceived concrete support when
Great Britain, which was later
given a League of Nations man-
date over Palestine, issued the
Balfour Declaration in 1917, prom-
ising to assist the Jews attain
their own homeland.
When the mandate was final-
ly given up by England, the Unit-
ed Nations decided that the best
way to prevent the imending'
conflict between the Arabs and
Israelis, and (at the same time)
give the Jews their own home-
land, was to partition Palestine
into two areas, and recognize the
Jewish part as Israel.
Readily Accepted
While the plan was readily ac-
cepted by the Israelis, it was com-
pletely rejected by the Arab na-
tions, who threatened war if the
plan was carried out. Thus the
Jews; declaring their independ-
ence on May 15, 1948, were force
to fight for the right to exist as
a nation, a right which had al
INSTANT SILENCE
For information write:
Academic Aids, Box 969
Berkeley, California
94701

ready been given them by the
United Nations.
After more than a year, the
Arab nations of Egypt, Syria, Jor-
dan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen
and Lebanon, driven back and
defeated, agreed to a truce es-
tablished by a UN delegation.
In the years since 1949 the
conflict between the Arabs and
Israel has centered about one ma-
jor problem, besides the existence
of the Jewish State, and one ma-
jor incident.
Arab Refugees
The problem concerns the thou-
sands of Arab refugees who were
made homeless after 1948. Before
the war, they were given a choice
of whether to remain in Israel as-
full citizens or to leave with
reparations for their fields and
homes.
After the war, Israel offered to
absorb 100,000 refugees, a plan
that was refused by the Arab na-
tions.Today Israel would not ac-
cept that many.
The Arab nations have not ab-
sorbedhasvmany refugees as they
could have.
The United Nations Relief and
Works Agency, which has admin+
istered the refugee camps, has
determined alone that Syria has
enough cultivable land to absorb
the now swollen numbers (almost
a million) of homeless Arabs.
Thus the problem persists,
operate with the United Nations.
Though Israel has continued to
be involved in border incidents
in the area, particularly with
Syria and Egypt, these have been
kept under control by the peace-
keeping force of the UN.
In 1956, however, after several
Fedayeen (commando) raids by
the Egyptians which murdered
families and destroyed settlements
along the Gaza Strip, the border
between the two nations, Israel
retaliated with a swift attack, and
within three days had established
control over the Sinai Peninsula
and the Gulf of Aquaba, and was

in a position to seize the Suez
Canal.
Through UN and U.S. pressure
the army retreated to its borders,
but the efficiency and ability of
the troops impressed military ex-
perts all over the world.
Thus, the situation between the

two opponents until several years
ago was serious enough. But now
with the Jordan River problem,
increased armaments on either
side and Arab humiliations such
as the West German incident, it
becomes even more serious and
threatening to world peace.

q=M B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
TON 1429 Hill Street
TONIGHT AT 8
LECTURE BY DR.' LOUIS GUTTMAN
Visiting Prof. Psychology and Sociology,
from Hebrew University
""INTEGRATING THE CULTURALLY
DIFFERENT: THE ISRAEL EXPERIENCE"
co-sponsored by HADASSAH and Social
Action Committee of BETH ISRAEL

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11

Congratulations to the 1966
MICHIGANENSIAN Junior Staff
Arts Editor-Pat Wallace
Associate Arts Editor-Bob Vreeland
Living Editor-Fred Lynch
Schools and Colleges Editor-Penny Righthand
Sports Editor-Dick Metzger
Associate Sports Editor-Mike Watts
Organizations Editor-Jan Friedman
Associate Organizations Editor-Chris Meyers
Senior Section Editor-Carolyn Cromwell
Supplement Manager-Jan McCall
Associate Supplement Manager-Harold Oseff
Sales Manager--Joanne Martindale
Contracts Manager-Phil Hammond
You're gonna be great!!

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, March 23, 12:00 Noon
U. M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"CURRENT AFFAIRS IN PAKISTAN"
Speaker: MR. RAIS KHAN
Graduate student in Political
Science from Pakistan
For reservations, Sponsored by the
call 668-6076 Ecumenical Campus Center

i

GAN-i0
s Hi R rM A KE
jiiN
P/"'A
The niceties{I
* * .Woman
The tailoring ? 3
...i.asn.
For women, Gant makes shirts, not blouses.
The difference is in the tailoring, which reflects
in the fit, the flair, the look. Of course, the
cut is in women's proportions. Most important,
Gant's a shirt that elegantly "says" quality,
and it keeps saying it after myriad washings.
In cotton oxford ... white, blue or maize. ;s650

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invite you to a recebtion for

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