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March 17, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THlE 311CIGAN DALY

WEDNESDAY. 17 RCA loa

PA ETW. ,.~lY.1 MT(U ot

ff LLl\ L\lLA A. 1 / Ivl AlLtj] I;JuJ

a

'U' Studies Spark Public Low-Cost Housing Interest)

(Continued from Page 1)
Ann Arbor. Using the 1960 census
figures Barlow had used, Moore
reported that there is a mini-
mum need of 1200 low-cost hous-
ing units in Ann Arbor.
One-Quarter Shelter
He based this on the idea that
a family should spend about one-
fourth of its income on shelter.
He then showed there is a sharp
discrepancy between rent and in-
come in Ann Arbor. That is, there
are too many low-income people
paying too high rents. Compar-
ed with th "Urban Michigan
Average," Moore wrote, the per-
centage of low-rent housing in
Ann Arbor is less, while the per-
centage of low-income families is
greater:
Moore found that while "76
per cent of all nonwhites have
an income of less than $4000,
only 36 per cent of all units rent-
ed to nonwhites rent for less than
$80 per month."
"Let's make a start on low-cost
housing programs now," HRC Di-
rector David C. Cowley declares.
"We've talked about 'n e e d'
enough. The need has been dem-
onstrated by the studies and by
the number of families requesting
low-cost housing."
Cowley concentrates his ap-
proach on the business communi-
ty in Ann Arbor. In his appeal
to businessmen, Cowley realizes
fully that investors do not feel it
is exclusively their "civic duty" to
put up the money for low-cost
housing.
Appeal to Creditors
"You have to appeal to credi-
tors through a dollar and cents,
channel," Cowley explains. He
and the HRC housing committee
are trying to organize a group of
investors who would go in on at
least a moderate-cost housing

' are providing privately-developed
homes for families under a leaseI
with an option-to-buy clause.
K: This clause allows a family to ap-
ply its renthpayments to a mort-
r ;gage on the house if they soa
desire.
In a Detroit project the HHFA
' granted $253,323 to the Housing
Commission which is supplying
housing for the displaced "skid
W M-row" population of single, low-
income males. The commission
purchased and remodeled an ex-
isting hotel structure with the
federal grant.
In New Haven, Conn., the HHFAI
,,!grants funds to the city which
supplements the rent of low-in-
come families. The city uses the
"scattered" approach - an ap-
proach to low-cost housing sim-
filar to what Cowley and other
low-cost housing proponents in
Ann Arbor would like to see.
A house is purchased by the lo-
cal housing authority and fixed
up. Then the low-income family
moves in without the neighbors
knowing that the family is be-
. ing supplemented by the city. This
-Daily-Jim Lines saves embarrassment.
Cowley referred to the HHFA
'luxury" apartments in Ann Ar- material on the Demonstration
housing. They seek help from Program to the city administra-
families, live in basements or in tor and the City Council's hous-
Ann Arbor for the number of ing committee.
Before Eligible-
Before a city is eligible for any
put up one of those 'cash-register' federal aid, though, it must meet
luxury apartments and rent to certain requirements. C o w 1 e 3
students," she says. "In fact, the hopes that Ann Arbor will soon
large student demand for a lim- 'have its own local housing au-
ited supply of housing in the city thority, one requirement for fed-
actually helps keep rents high." eral aid.
The profit-return, however, or Ann Arbor does have a Work-
low and moderate cost housinf able Program Committee made ur
developments is not always low of laymen and designed to advise
One city hall official had heart the City Council on the housing
that the moderate-income Smok- situation. But it has been charged
ler development on Platt Rd. re- by some councilmen with inactiv-
turns a 14 per cent profit on the ity.

MANY OLD houses have recently been torn down to make room for"
bor. Families have been dislocated and can't always find low-rent
groups, but even then they often are forced to double up with other
other substandard housing. There is not enough low-rent housing in
low-income families.
project. apply for federal aid under an
Cowley hopes such a group will urban renewal project. But after
induce bankers to lower their in- the City Council had approved the
terest rates on a loan for a hous- project, the newly-elected Mayoi
ing program, once they see that Cecil 0. Creal vetoed the plan
the program would have solid and council couldn't get the votes
backing. to override his veto.)
(Such a business group was or- Mrs. Eunice Burns, Democratic
ganized six years ago by Prof. candidate for mayor, feels pessi-1
Samuel Eldersveld, political sci- mistic about getting private de-
ence department chairman and velopers to go in on a low-cost
then mayor of Ann Arbor. The housing project for Ann Arbor.
group put up enough money to "It's much more profitable to!

problem in Ann Arbor seems tc
want a stereotyped, low-cost, high".
rise "project development."
Attacks Project
Mrs. Burns attacks such 4
project as tending to "concen-
trate all our problems in one
area." She stresses, instead, a pro-
gram which would scatter low-
income families throughout the
city. Mt. Clemens, she mentions.
has such a program.
Cowley opposes high-rise proj-
ects also, saying he has seen such
projects in Detroit where he work-
ed in the public welfare depart-I
nenLt
AT ANN ARBOR'S
NEWEST BOOKSTORE
the poetry of
WARREN
BERRYMAN
10 WELL
contemporary literature
scholarly editions
in the humanities
french and german books
'7fie Ccn~icore&
1321 South University
between Forest & Woshtenaw
open noon to midnight
Monday through Saturday

TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM FRIDAY,

MARCH 39
8:00 P.M.

Tickets ($3, $2) by mail or in person. Dept, of Romance
Languages 2076 Frieze Building.
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
Cnd
The Opera Department, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
present

'4

I
I
4

DIRECT FROM PARIS
"LE TRETEAU DE PARIS
presents
L'ANNONCE FAITEs A MARIE
by
Paul Claudel

4t
4

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Lindquist To Speak on Da

- original investment. The city must also show active
Cowley has not limited his ap- enforcement of housing code
proach merely to the private bus- standards. Cowley feels this re-
inessmen. He has also sent to quirement has been met since the
ta Collection Washington, D.C., for information public safety department hires
about possible federal aid. two additional housing inspector:
Although a conservative city last year.
novelist, poet and critic, will visit like Ann Arbor may not agree to Suspicions
nheliHtpoetnd critimAngllvsitoutright grants for a project hous- But Cowley also believes ther
the Hopwood Room, Angell Hall. development, a new so-called is a general suspicion toward a
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Philip Rieff 9f Demonstration Program seems tc federally-financed housing pro-
the University of Pennsylvania allow for almost complete local gram in Ann Arbor. These suspi-
will lecture on "Cooley on Cul- initiative in handling low-cost cions of federal involvement, Cow-
ture" in Aud. B.
housing programs. ley says, are outdated and should

WED.-SAT., MARCH 17-20
8:00 P.M.
MATINEE, SUNDAY, MARCH 21
2:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY
AFTER 12:30 P.M.
ALL PERFORMANCES SOLD OUT

I

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
10 a.m.-E. F. Lindquist, presi-
dent of the Michigan Measure-
ment and Research Center, will
speak on "Information Gathering
and Decisions in Education" in
the Rackham Bldg.
3 p.m. -Lester Markel of the
New York Times will speak on
"Responsibility to the Nation, to
the Reader, and to the Individual
Citizen" in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the UGLI.
3:15 p.m.-Leslie Edie of 'the
New York Port Authority will
speak on "Operations Research in
Transportation Engineering" in
Rackham Aud.
4 p.m.--Robert Penn Warren,
novelist, poet and critic, will speak
informally at Martha Cook, .In
the "Gold Room."
4 p.m.-Prof. William Halstead
CONTINUOUS [ POPULAR
PERFORMANCES I PRICES 1
STANLEY RAMER "IT'S A
MAD,
ULTRA MAD, MAD,
PANAYISI MAD
UNIARTI WORW,
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25
Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Shows ot
1:00 - 3:40 - 6:25 - 9:10
- -U6 - -

of the speech department will lec-
ture on "Through Europe by
Stage" in Rackham lecture hall.
4 p.m. - Daris R. Swindler of
Michigan State University will
speak on "The Dynamics of Pri-
mate Tooth Development" in Rm.
2501 East Medical Bldg.
4 p.m. - President and Mrs.
Harlan Hatcher will sponsor an
all-student tea at their home.
4:15 p.m. -- Prof. W. Norman
Brown of the University of Penn-
sylvania will speak on "Time Is a
Noose" in Aud. F of the Physics-
Astronomy Bldg.
8 p.m.-Prof. Otto Laporte of
the physics department will speak
on Sir William Hamilton, and
Prof. Phillip Edwards of the Eng-
lish department will speak on Wil-
liam Yeats in Rackham Ampi-
theatre.1
8 p.m.-The speech department
will present Mozart's "The Magic
Flute" at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre in the Michigan League.
8 p.m.-Msgr. John F. Bradley
will speak on "How a Christian
Couple Approaches Marriage -
The Courtship, Engagement, Mar-
riage" in the Gabriel Richard
Center.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present
"Oliver" in Hill Aud.
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
3 p.m.-Robert Penn Warren,
DIAL 8-6416
Ends Tonight
"YOU CANNOT AFFORD
TO MISS IT!";'l ,b
'*, * ;
ca y Ne

4:10 p.m.-The Student Labora-E
tory Theatre will present Pinter's
"The Dumb Waiter" in the Arena
Theatre of the Frieze Bldg.
4:10 p.m.--Prof. Lily Ross Tay-
lor of Bryn Mawr College will lec-
ture on "The Centuriate Assem-
bly in the Light of New Evidence"
in Aud. A.
4:15 p.m.-President Harlan H.
Hatcher will participate in a
convocation on "Stuent Partici-
pation and Responsibility" in the
Hussey Rm. of the League.
7:30 p.m. - Michigan Christian
Fellowship will sponsor a panel,
"Your Patient's Dying . . .?" in
Rm. 5104 of the nursing school.
8 p.m. - Robert Penn Warren,
novelist, poet and critic, will speak
in Rackham Aud.
8 p.m.---A Purim debate, "The
Latke vs. the Hammantasch and
the Great Society," will be held at
Hillel Foundation.
8 p.m.-Mozart's "Magic Flute"
will be presented in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-Joel Britton of the
Young Socialist Alliance will
speak on "The War in Viet Nam
-A Socialist Analysis" in Rm. 3S
of the Union.
Homeco ming
Positions Open
Petitions are now available for
all students interested in posi-
tions on the Homecoming '65 Cen-
tral Committees. Petitions are
available at the student offices of
the Union and the League.
Posts are open on the Alumni
Relations, Booklet,. Communica-
tions, Dance, Finances, Friday
Afternoon, Graphics, Promotions
Secretary, Special Events anc
Tickets Committees.
The petitions are due on Mon-
day, March 22. Further informa-
tion can be obtained by contact-
ing Barbara Ncpstad, at 663-
0575 or Andy Falendar, at 663-
0190.
This year's homecoming will be
held October 15 and 16.
There will be no Michigras next
year and so attempts will be made
to expand the Homecoming pro-
gram.

A reply from Housing and Home
Finance Administrator Robert C. 1
Weaver informed Cowley that the
agency can make grants from a
fund of $10 million to public or
private groups for "developing
and demonstrating new or im-
proved means of providing hous-I
ing for low-income persons and
families."
Private Development
In several cities new programsI

be dispelled with opportunities
like the Demonstration Program.
City Republicans have long been
opposed to such aid, although Re-
publican mayoral candidate Wen-
dell Hulcher stresses what he calls
a "human betterment" program
which should be sponsored by al
phases of government, from fed-
eral to city levels.
No city official. directly con-
cerned with the low-cost housing

Block Ticket Sales Begin TODAY
For
GLEE CLUB
ANNUAL SPRING CONCERT
Saturday, MARCH 27th, 8:30 P.M.

,i,

SOLD OUT

"A ROUSING BEGUILING " RANKS WITH MY
MUSICAL"-united Pre FAIR LADY"-Da)iy News
HENRY GUETTEL and ARTHUR CANTOR
~mt AVIDby special arrangement with
DAVIDMERRICK and DONALD ALBERY
JULES MUNSHIN-JOAN EASTMAN'

tickets
at Hill

sold
Box

(8:15-4:45)
Office

$1.50, $2.00, $2.50

I

;

4.

I

HARLAN.,HATCHER

I

Dial 662-6264
ENDING TODAY
Shown at 1-3-5-7:05 and 9:15
p..
MEN MNNffrt0&oo?
r IAN FLEING'~S
"GOLDFINGER"
TECHNICOLOR mw... towUNITEDRTISTS
0 FRIDAY 0
rangler
cowboy
with
00rounder
isas

"NOTHIG
BUT A MAN"
-Thursday-
"PEYTON PLACE"
and
"RETURN TO
PEYTON PLACE"
L - __________ ~ .

1
tr

Creative Arts Festival
Thursday, March 18 ... 8:00 Rackham

I

I

ROBERT PENN WARREN
Eloquent and forceful, Robert Penn Warren has achieved excellence and high praise in
three overlapping areas as poet, novelist, and critic. His criticism, both literary and social
(see his most recent article, "The Negro Now" in March 23rd Look Magazinel avoids

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I TPI: TOPIr OP STI 11 PIT DOI ITIf AI ArTI\l1CAA

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