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March 16, 1965 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-16

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PAGES IX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, 16 MARCH 1965

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, 16 MARCH 1965

Regionals: More

Than a

Victory

BENEDICT SAYS:

Dia mondmen Not Ready Yet'

By GIL SAMBERG
The 1965 version of the NCAA
Mideast Regional Tournament is
over, finished, and dead. It had a
little bit of everything:
It showed that a 7' basketball
player need not dominate the
game, that Big Ten ball is like
none in the East, rthatan intang-
ible item called "heart" can at
times go a long way with very
little behind it, and that Kentucky
grass isn't blue.
There were partisans from all
of the four represented schools
and there were Michigan alumni,
but many of the almost 12,000 fans
assembled in the hall were fairly
non-aligned followers of the sport
from Lexington and from the uni-
versity campus delaying their
eight-day spring vacation for a
day or two to catch the specacle of
the Regionals.
NBA Franchise
Now, Adolph Rupp, who .at the
present time has the finest win-
ning record of all active coaches
in the nation, has had some fine
teams there, major ranked teams,
and not too long ago. But the
teams were not like the Wolver-

ines . .. and they weren't in the
Big Ten.
Rupp himself declared that
"Michigan's starting team weighs
1,064 pounds and it's all top grade
beef. That team could get a fran-
chise in the National Basketball
Association right now."
As for the Michigan fans from
Ann Arbor, who had seen it -
dunking drills and all - before,
they,, for some strange reason,
were hidden in the highest, far-
thest, corner grandstand seats in
the house. And when they dimmed
the lights for the games, you
couldn't tell by sight that they
were around . . . but you could
hear them.
Percussion Impression
The Pep Band, 25 strong, made
the Blue feel right at home with
the thunder of their percision beat
arrangements, and it sounded as
if at least 10 of the 25 were in the
percussion section.
In the first game, Dayton was
well represented, too. The school
was characterized by a member of
its student newspaper as "surpris-
ingly hopeful." Their multitude of
signs would have made a Mets fan

M-phasis by TOM WEINBERG
Sports Editor
It's all a myth. Everything about the Michigan basketball team is
surrounded by myths, from the opponents' preconceived killer intent
to regularity with which Coach Dave Strack's team pulls off last-
minute wins.
- Nothing could be more typical of the negative effect the Michigan
team has on its opponents than the feeling of Princeton's own fable,
Bill Bradley, as he looks toward Friday night's rematch in Portland.
"We've been waiting for this since 11:30 on Dec. 30," the moment
Cazzie Russell's jumper eked out a last-second 80-78 win over the
Tigers in the semifinals of the Madison Square Garden Holiday tour-
nament. But that's par for the course.
Coach Roy Skinner of Vanderbilt, which was lucky to qualify for
last Saturday's Mideast regional finals, admitted that his team had
been plotting for Michigan for at least two weeks before the game.
And that's no different from the coaches and players whose teams
have fallen 22 times this season. Every team builds up the "monster"
image so high before every game that it takes weekly miracles to
beat each one.
Sure, there should be pressure on the top-ranked team in the
nation. That's What it means to be the best. But it just never figured
that every team would reach such heights for the Michigan game.
From now on, of course, nobody will let down, least of all Princeton.
Pressure out on the court is one thing, but there's another that's
really unfair: the insatiable expectations of the so-called fans. Unless
Cazzie scores 30, Buntin gets 28 with a couple dozen rebounds and
the team wins by 30, the critics are positive something must be wrong.
They'll say it's Strack's fault. Or put down Cazzie for not putting
forth his best effort until the final minutes. Or just run down the
team.
None of it's justified. The top-ranking has put everything out of
perspective for the skeptics. Those who sat in front of their tele-
visions waiting for the victory to just-happen Saturday night had
good reason to think it was coming, but those who criticized are no
more than fair weather fans. It's just like the primitive myths-it's
'going to happen, so you might as well believe it!
* * * *
The team is set to fly to Portland Thursday for the game at
10:30 Ann Arbor time on Friday. The pep band that practically
all Lexington observers agree made a huge difference in the un-
friendly confines of Kentucky's Coliseum last weekend will also
be on its way along with some 250 other ardent fans who bought
out the University's allotment of tickets yesterday afternoon.
Those who won't make the trip can make their small spirit con-
tribution by adding their names to the 100-foot long telegram
that will be sent to the team with some 5,000 names procured
tomorrow and Thursday on the Diag and at the Union.
* . s "
Basketball still occupies center stage in the Michigan sports
panorama, but the football team opened its "spring" drills yesterday
and all four spring sports are in the bloom. Contrary to still another
myth-one that has been perpetrated since the Regents' February
meeting-spring sports at Michigan are not on the verge of being
eliminated by the trimester calendar. The Big Ten faculty repre-
sentatives have passed legislation which permits Michigan teams to
compete this year in all spring sports, although many of the athletes
won't be enrolled in the University and Athletic Director H. O. "Fritz"
Crisler expects that the ruling will be upheld in its present form until

feel right at home . . . as the
results proved.
Huntin' for Buntin
"Mash Mich" they said. . . "We
Will Smash Cazzie??" . . . a sim-
ple multicolored sign repeating
with conviction "Kill Kill Kill"
and last but not least "Hun-
tin' For Buntin."
The problem for Dayton and
their signs was that they found
what they were "huntin" for. As
a bonus, Coach Dave Strack threw
in Cazzie Russell, Oliver Darden,
Larry Tregoning, and George
Pomey to boot. The results were
overwhelming.
The four guards that Dayton
coach Don Donoher rotated in and
out of the. action would exit in a
state of shell-shock. The audi-
torium was emptying with more
than 13 minutes remaining in the
game, and with 10 minutes to go
it seemed that everyone was con-
vinced. The dam had broken, and
waiting around for the town to
flood was useless.
'Buntin's Best'
Buntin outplayed his highly-
touted adve'sary, 7' Henry Finkel,
causing the Dayton center to say
that "Buntin is one of the best, as
tough as they come. But Mich-
igan has the horses all the way
around."
Buntin was a unanimous choice
to the All-Tournament team
among the 61 writers and com-
mentators at the game, and Rus-
sell also made the first team. Tre-
goning and Darden were named
to the second unit.
DePaul's Coach Ray Meyer,
who's team had lost to Vanderbit
on Friday night, said later, "You
give us Buntin and we'd be in the
finals."
Lee Gets MVP
The tournament's Most Valuable
Player, Vanderbilt's own Clyde
Lee, copped the honor. Teammate
Keith Thomas was also accorded
tournament team honors.
It was Meyer's DePaul team
that fought for an upset over the
Commodores in the tourney open-
er. And it was a relative unknown
on that team, Errol Palmer, also
picked for the All-Tournament
squad, who easilyAovershawoded
Lee's play in that battle.
Palmer's fantastic game seemed
to surprise everyone but his coach,
himself one of the best in col-
legiate circles. Palmer is 6'5" tall
and not necessarily a leader, but
he is a powerful jumper.
Leads Rebounders
Palmer became his team's tallest
man for the last 17 minutes of
that game, when he was forced to
play center backed up by 6' to
6'1" players. Fighting against the
Vandy's front line, which ran
6'9," 6'7," 6'5," he led all re-
bounders with 19 and all scorers
with 28. But DePaul just couldn't
take it away from the Commo-
dores when he fouled out.
When Michigan hit the boards
against Vanderbilt in the final,
the eastern referees couldn't seem
to adjust. The first half was dulled
by a multitude of fouls on both
teams. By the second half, things
had changed and the game went
back into the hands of the players.
Vanderbilt Coach Roy Skinner
was the first to admit "Michigan
is a big, powerful team, but they
play a clean game. We expected to
be physically hurt under the
boards but that wasn't the way
they played it. Michigan plays a
shooting game."
And when it was over the Wol-
verines were astounded,has was
everyone else, to.find that Prince-
ton had pulled off one of the
year's bigest upsets in trampling
Providence 109-69 at College
Park, Md.

By LYNN METZGER before their spring trip.
"We still have to do a lot of All toll, the diamondmen lust
work to be ready for our Big Ten two games to Arizona State by the
opener against , Wisconsin," said scores of 5-2 and 11-3 whit; Ari-
Michigan baseball coach Moby zona. delt them another two de-
Benedict yesterday. feats by the scores of 8-2 and 8-7.
Michigan's diamondmen came Even Grand Canyon College was
home from their spring trip i able to hand Michigan two losses,
Arizona last weekend with a dis- in. a double-header, 3-2 and 6-4.
mal 1-7 record. Their only victory Upon returning to Ann Arbor,
came in the first game of their Benedict gave his team a two-day
trip against Arizona State, 6-3. layoff from practice. The dia-
Benedict went on to say, "On mondmen will start practice again
the whole the hitting wasn't too tomorrow when they begin prepa-
bad but the pitching was a little rations for their official season's
disappointing." (The Wolverines otner against Bowling Green on
were outscored by their opponents, Alril 6.
56-27, in the eight games played.)
"If we're going to go anywhere Thing aren't as bad as it
this season our pitching has got seems for the Wolverines. Last
to improve," Benedict continued. year they compiled only a 4-8
"They can't rely on their reputa-reordbtaedba 0-4nBAg
tions from last year," (referring bor and racked up a 10-4 Big
to the four veteran pitchers whoT ecod whiyho planesothem.
went without a . win). "They've second only to Minnesota at 11-3.
got to prove themselves again."______
Reed's Ready x
The batmen coach could cite
only one pitcher who is ready to
start the Big Ten season. "Bob
Reed did all right; he's ready tsoe
pitcher to. emerge from tho trip
with a victory, going the full nine
innings in their lone triumpah.) ?'. f
A novel feature of ti-s year's
spring trip was the cancallation of >
two games because of weather dif-
ficulties. In the seven year history
of Michigan's journeys west there
had never been a cancellation.
One point to keep in mind about
the seven losses is that all of -tha O
Wolverines' opponents have been FOR ALL YOUR FO
able to practice outside kill year ~ TUEO ~ WI
round. Due to the Michigan cliQ TUXEDOS QWHIT
mate the Wolverines had only WEDDINGS-PROM
conducted limited practices inside
"Special Studen
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL R
NIT
(Quarterfinals) TUXEDO RENTAL
St. John's 61, New Mexico 54
villanova 73, Manhattan 71 1 230 Packard
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 0
Los Angeles (N) 4, Houston I ---- -- - - - - - -
Milwaukee 4, Baltimore 2
Philadelphia 1, New York (N) 0
Pittsburgh 17, Chicago (A) 4
Cleveland 5, Chicago (N) 3 (11 inn)
eBoston 9, Los Angeles (A) 4
Kansas City 5, Detroit 4
New York (A) 4, Minnesota 3

A-

-Daily-Kamalakar RaoI

MICHIGAN'S BILL BUNTIN works for two of "his 26 points in
Friday night's 98-%1 victory over Dayton in the NCAA Regional.
Attempting to stifle Buntin's attempted hook is the 6'11" giant
of the Flyers, Henry Finkel.
COLD SHOULDER PADS:
Weather Puts Damper
On First Spring' Drills

MOBY BENEDICT
RMAL NEEDS!
FE DINNER JACKETS
AS-DANCES
t Rates"
L SERVICE
NO 5-4549

'I

By CHUCK VETZNER
It was the first day of spring'
practice for the Michigan football
team yesterday, but somehow it
didn't seem like spring.
The grey snow from an old'
storm was still visible at the back
edges of Ferry Field.
When the uniformed players
came trotting out, the usual
crunch of hard earth under their
cleats was replaced by a gentle
oozing sound ofathe water-logged
and muddy field. '
Whether it was spring or win-
ter, it was still football. And
although the cold was more sting-
ing than the tackling, the squad
went through. a regular drill, re-
plete with calisthenics, running,
and contact sessions producing
their usual share of gashes and
bruises.
Toward the end of the day, new
snow flurries flew through the air

along with the footballs and cast
doubts on whether practice would
be held today.
But according to Big Ten rules,
a team has only 30 days to get in
their 20 practices. Maybe that's
the reason Mason said, "It's a
beautiful day . . . it's got to be."
Head coach Bump Elliott con-
siders defensive end, and offen-
sive guard and center the "critical
spots" on the team.
L The first string units now show
junior Byron Tennant at center,
flanked by Dennis Flanagan and
Ken Wright at the guard posi-
tions.
Clay Wilhite and Stan Kemp are
holding down the end spots. Kemp
was the team punter last year but
saw little action otherwise. Wil-
hite had previously worked pri-
marily at offensive split end and
also handled some of the kick-off
chores.

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SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
BOB CARNEY

INSTANT SILENCE
For information write:-
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