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March 16, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-16

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SDA"Y', .16 MARCH 1965,

THE MICH16AN DAILY

PAnE TYMPIR

SDAY, 16 MARCH 1965 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

r :IW IrIi r

m

arABONN EMBASSY PACKS:
L. .Navy, Air Force omre Egpia Gra
Tet C n untnDupFre'sh Get Egyptian German
iet Cong Munition Dump Vote Results' Relations Weaken

:
r
5

f

'redict Chinese
o Send Troops
Lo Aid Hanoi
k1GON -A powerful armada
Jnited States Navy and Air
e planes blasted the Phu
ammunition depot only 100
ssouth of Hlanoi yesterday.
tas the sixth and possibly
punishing raid of a series
ched a g a i n s t Communist
h Viet Nam,
ap defense officials told Pres-
t Lyndon B. Johnson that the
:e was a success.
most at the same time, South1
Nam's ambassador predicted
China will react to the bomb-
raids by sending in strong
unteer ground forces as it
in Korea.j
ore than lou Navy and Air
e planes joined in the rai'
nst Viet Cong guerrilla sup-
White House Meeting !
a two-hour White House
ting Army Chief of Staff Har-
K. Johnson reported on his9
nt trip to Viet Nam. He toldt
rters "I think the air striker;
given the North Vietnamese
e to pause and think a little
ae prediction that Red Chi
troops could be expected tr1
sent by Peking to aid the
rillas came from Tran Thier

:,

By The Associated Press
CAIRO (/PV-West Germany embassy officials started packing
Supporters of former Argentine yesterday and said it was possible they would haul down their flag
dictator Juan Peron tripled their and end diplomatic activities ii Egypt by tomorrow because of the
tina elections yesterday while pending establishment of Israeli-German diplomatic relations.
the Gaullist party held its posi- At the same time, the Egypitian foreign ministry announced its
tion in elections in France. ambassador to West Germany will not return to Bonn, in line with
The voting in Argentina, yes- the decision of Arab foreigne--- -
terday, was a showdown between ministers meeting here to with-
the supporters of the exiled Per- draw their chief envoys from Bonn os cow Calls f
on and the government party of immediately

-Associated Press
While air force and navy planes hit the Viet Cong ammunition
dump, marines guarded the important Danang air base. The raid
was based from Danang.

President Arturo U. Illis. The Arab meeting, at the
Undaunted by their leader's beckoning of President Gamal
failure to return from Spain, the Abdel Nasser of Egypt, voted early
Peronists polled about 35 per cent yesterday to break off diplomatic
of the total vote. relations with Bonn when the
French government figures West Germans and Israelis offi-
showed last night that the Gaul- cially seal their diplomatic ties.
list Party Feld its own but failed Israel's parliament is scheduled
to attract any marked new grass to vote in Jerusalem today on the
roots support in the first round of decision of Prime Minister Levi
municipal elections. Eshkol's cabinet to accept Bonn's
At the same time, it was clear offer for diplomatic ties.
that at least on the local level the In Bonn, a West German gov-
French political party system is ernient spokesman said the gov-
as splintered as when Charles de ernment welcomed relations with
Gaulle became president more Israel but said it would greatly
than six years ago as head of regret a break in relations by the
France's Fifth Republic. Tradi- Arab countries,
tional parties were then ousted But the shape of Bonn's actual
from power on the national level, future relations with Cairo and
Efforts of the Communists and especially with the rest of the
Socialists to win more seats Arab world remained clouded
through "popular front" coali- after the Arab foreign ministers'
tions met with no apparent suc- conference.
cess. West German officials and
One of de Gaulle's main fights Western diplomats in Cairo said
since he returned to power has they still were confused about the
been against the old parties and degree of unanimity--or the lack
formations which led France in- of it-with which the Arab states
to a near political impasse. voted the sanctions against Bonn.

war-like moves or troops and air
deployment in the south of China.
The Chinese Communists have
an estimated 200,000 to 300,000
troops assigned to the south
China area bordering North Viet
Nam.
"We can predict now," Khiem
said, in an interview, "that Red
Chinese volunteers will be enter-
ing Viet Nam." He did not give
the source of his information.
'Prepare for Reaction'
Khiem said American and Viet-

namese forces should expect
something so that when the Chi-
nese Communists react "we will
not be caught by surprise."
He asserted Communist China
has ground forces of more than
2 million men and "we have 10
divisions."
"Their tactics are those of the
human waves," he said. "Now it
would be a good idea for the
United States to send an army
division and to increase the size
of the South Vietnamese forces."

For Students
To Stop Riots
MOSCOW .'P)-Soviet authori-
ties have ordered some foreign
students in Moscow not to take
part in any further street dem-
onstrations, student sources said
yesterday.
The prohibition appeared aimed
at students who joined in a riot-
ous anti-American demonstration
at the U.S. Embassy March 4.
Unarmed Red army soldiers had
to be called to restore order. The
demonstrators used American ai
raids on North Viet Nam as their
pretext.
Informants said some students
at Patrice Lumumba University
which mainly attracts youths
from underdeveloped n a t i o n s,
have been warned against parti-
cipation in any more demonstra-
tions.
The Soviet Union has rejected
Chinese charges of brutality and
inadequate medical care for Chi-
nese students injured March 4. It
has countered that the Chinese
students provoked the disorder.
In the past, Soviet authorities
have used demonstrations at for-
eign embassies to support their
foreign policy.
DANCE to,
WASHBOARD WILI
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Tues. &Wed. 9 p.m.-1 :45
at the SCHWABEN INN
215 S. Ashley

i

MUSKET PETITIONING
FOR
GENERAL CO-CHAIRMEN
Pick up petitions
at League Undergrad Office
TUESDAY MARCH 16-
SUNDAY, MARCH 21
Due back Mon., Mar.22
I* *
0 by 500 p1m
courtixi,
On your way to the
action, here's the { .
sweater to wear. And
if you're clever, you
won't limit it to
tennis dates -- all
wr outdoors is your excuse
M to slip it on.
Read and Use .Daily Classifieds

hiem, a former commander in HITS AMERICAN POLICY:
f of the South Viet Nam Ar-

and minister of defense, said
United States should antici-
this by building up both the

Favors Bargaining with North Viet Nam

ve army and its own support-
forces.
e advocated sending a U.S.
y division to South Viet Nam,
Iling that the Chinese leader'
Tse-tung has declared Red1
ia and North Viet Nam "are;
the mouth and the teeth."
iTo Indication of Movements
.S. officials, told of Khiem's
k iction, said they have seen
reports indicating any new

By MARK R. KILLINGSWORTH
A top French expert on Viet
Nam favors direct talks with the
North Vietnamese as a possible
solution to the Southeast Asia
crisis.
Speaking in the Union Ball-
room in Sunday's Challenge lec-
ture, Prof. Bernard Fall of How-
ard University, pointed to a March

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, March 16, 12:00 Noon
U. M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES"
Speaker: MR. A. 0 0ODELEYE
Development Officer, Univ. of Ife, ibadan, Nigeria
For reservations, Sponsored by the
call 668-6076 Ecumenical Campus Center
CGamp ToHo-Ne for Boys
Great Barrington, Mass.

10 North Vietnamese offer to
negotiate after United States
bombardment f North Viet Nam
and military operations in South
Viet Nam had ceased.
"They did not ask for immedi-
ate withdrawal of United States
troops, which is a change in their
position," he said. He charged
that the U.S. had ignored the
offer.
A New Deal?
"We're throwing our best cards
away," Fall said. He declared that
the U.S. would have several ad-
vantages in negotiations with the
North Vietnamese government:
-The North Vietnamese lead-
ership "is far more sophisticated
and far less intransigent than
the Chinese,"
--"The North has achieved eco-
nomic progress only at the price
of forced labor, low living stand-
ards, and regimentation and has
a horror of U.S. bombing, which
it knows would be an incalculable
setback."
-The North Vietnamese want
to raise their standard of living
and, in particular, needs the rice
of the fertile South Vietnamese
Mekong Delta.
"But even though the 1954
agreements call for unrestricted
trade, and even though other di-
vided nations such as East and
West Germany trade with each
other, we've ignored this avenue."
Were North Viet Nam to get the
trade, he declared, "they would'
become dependent on the South
for much of her standard of liv-

ing-and that would be a con-j
siderable regulatory device for!
Titoism Possible3
Fall also declared that, given
its traditional animosity to China.
the North might become a South-
east Asian Yugoslavia, a view he
has held for several years.
"I don't know whether the
North could become 'Titoist' or
not. I do know it will not fight
for the joy of being dominated
by China," he said,
"The Chinese ruled Viet Nam
from 111 B.C. to 938 A.D.," Fall
pointed out. "The Viet Cong want
to be Vietnamese, not Chinese,,
even if they say so in a language

military and political successors
for "the mythology that the war
should be fought on battle lines."
Revolutionary Warfare
"This warfare is revolutionary
warfare-and the winning for-
muia is control of the people plus
guerrilla action," he said.
Demonstrating the large nun-
ber of incidents, assassinations,
and tax collections by regularized
Viet Cong "shadow governments"
in hamlets and even provinces-
all behind battle lines-Fall main-
tained that "things were out of
control years before anyone dis-
covered that President Ngo Dinh
Diem was unpopular and cor-
rupt."

I~~~~~~~~~~ }---7-_ _ _-_ _ _ ____

similar to Chinese." The guerrillas, Fall explained
Attacking the "mythology of "seek to cut the key links of the
the Peking-Hanoi axis," Fall said government --- in this case, the
"It no more exists than the Mos- elected village chieftains." In
cow-Peking axis." what Fall called "a monumental

President and Mrs. Hatcher
invite the students
of the University of Michigan
to an Olen House

Whither the War?
Fall, who has spent years in
the country and interviewedj
North Vietnamese leader Ho Chi
Minh in 1961, also discussed the
conduct of the war in Viet Nam.
"The Viet Minh won in 1954
without ever controlling a city,"
he noted. "Bombing the Viet Cong
now will only be useful for pur-
poses of negotiation." He noted
that the recent State Department'
White Paper admitted that only
179 weapons had been "infiltrat-
ed" from the North in 18 months.
He also criticized French ad-
ministrators and their American

piece of stupidity," the late Pres-
ident Diem replaced them with
chiefs whom he appointed him-
self.

16- mwm

5

)PENINGS

FOR COUNSELORS: General;

some key

-- --.......--
For the best in
BOOKS
Browse at
FOL L ETT'S
State Street at N.U.

March 17, front 4#00-6:00

P.M.

ersonnel: tennis, archery, photography. Aquatics, in-
luding experienced competent Waterfront director to
fandle staff of 8, WSI's, smallcraft, waterskiing. Wood
hop. Age 20+. Excellent facilities for field and aquatics
ictivities. Rich cultural program.
ALARIES: General: $300-$400. Key personnel and
pecial activity heads; $500 and up, contingent on age,
xperience, competence. Single men only. Will consider
amily set-up for WF director. Camp established 1921,
ompotible with good job. Interviews end of March or
arly in April. Write Peter Menaker, 507 W. 113 St.
4YC. TO-HO-NE application forms available in SPB.

I

it

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
and
The Opera Department, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
present

IIoune d' arns
I A WEEK
10 OR MORE
THIIIS SUMMER
ee cream specliies manufacturer/
will hold on-campus Interviews on this date.
REGIST ER NOW!
Your Summer Piacement Director or Student Aid Officer
will set up an interview schedule for you. sI you're selected
your job is reserved until school closes.
Ud you may start work as early as April 1st.
E ARNINGS AR E BIG WIT H GOOD HUMOR
Of the students working six or more weeks last Summer -

-

j 1

WED.-SAT., MARCH 17-20
8:00 P.M.

MATINEE, SUNDAY, MARCH 21
9.*- U1 PM_

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