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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 27, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIRE MICI

TH M~AN DlAILY

)sygin Demands Withdrawal)

Say Visit
,No Sign' of
Toleration

rom

Viet Nam; U.S. Unmoved)

SayS read
Of Conflict
A Possibility
Indicates Soviets
May Be Aiding North
MOSCOW (J)-Premier Alexe
N. Kosygin demanded last night
that the United States pull its
troops out of South Viet Nam,
saying U.S. action there could
cause the conflict to "transcend
its original boundaries."
"Aggression against the peoples
of Viet Nam cannot go unpunish-
ed," Kosygin declared in a 33-
rninute television address report-
ing on his visit to Communist
North Viet Nam, Communist China
and North Korea.
Recalling the announcement in
Hanoi of an agreement on Soviet-
Vietnamese measures "to increase
the security and strengthen the
defensive capability" of North
Viet Nam, Kosygin said: "Now this
agreement is being carried out."
Weapons Delivery
This suggested that delivery of
some types of Soviet weapons to
Hanoi already has begun, al-
though there have been no con-
firmed reports ofbit Antiaircraft
missiles and possible fighter planes
s were expectedds by some non-
Communist observers in Moscow
to be supplied.
Kosygin indicated that Soviet
terms for any peace talks on Viet
Nam are a promise of no more
U.S. air raids on North Viet Nam.
In Washington, Secretary of
State Dean Rusk said Thursday,
a halt to what he called North
Vetnaanese aggression against
South Viet Nam wassneeded be-
fore any avenues can be explored
in the direction of negotiations.
Deny Aggression
Kosygin in effect denied that
there is any aggression from North
Viet Nam. Referring to a "na-
tional liberation movement in
youth Viet Nam," he said "it is
of a genuinely nationwide char-
acter."
This followed the Communist
line that Viet Cong activities are
locally based, contrary to Ameri-
can charges.
Not Indifferent
Ie repeated the termĀ° of a
Soviet government statement made
after the Feb. 7-8 U.S. air raids
on North Viet Nam: "The Soviet
Union will not remain indifferent
o the fate of a fraternal republic
and will render her the necessary
Kosygin added: "No one should
delude himself into thinking that
aggression against People's Viet
Nam could go unpunished." Pre-
vious Soviet statements in the
sae nterms have failed to elabor-
Say Indonesia
Seizes Firms
JAKARTA, Indonesia MP) - The
Indonesian government has taken
over management of United States
rubber plantations in Sumatra in
what amounts to seizure of the
property, reliable sources said yes-
terday.
The U.S. embassy declined to
comment on the report, and there
was no official confirmation.
U.S. Ambassador Howard P.
Jones was assured only Wednes-
day that the Indonesian govern-
ment had, no intention of taking
over the estates.
That was after workers declared
they had seized the plantations in

a gesture of solidarity with the
people of Viet Nam and Indones-
ian Foreign Minister Subandrio
had gone to North Sumatra os-
tensibly to investigate.
A mob of Indonesians attack-
ed the cars of U.S. Consul Theo-
dore Heavener and the Norwegian'
consul at Medan, Wednesday, the
U.S. Embassy reported.
The two consuls' cars were at-
tackel as they left Medan Air-
port after attending the arrival
of Subandrio.
U-M Concert Dance Organization
15th ANNUAL
DANC'E
0'
N
N E
D

Name Lodge
To Review

'-(

-Associated Press.
IN SOUTH VIET NAM, BRIG. GEN. Nguyen Chan Thi, com-
mander of the First Corporation (above) is the apparent aspirant
for commander in chief of armed forces. This is the post from
Which Lieut. Gen. Nguyen Khanh was recently ousted. Soviet
Premier Alexei B. Kosygin asked yesterday in a television address
for withdrawal of U.S. troops from South Viet Nam.
THREE PARTS PASS:I
House To Consider Key
Points of School Bill,
WASHINGTON MP)-The House Education Committee gave quick
approval to three more sections of the administration's school bill
yesterday, but left the toughest part for last.
Committee Chairman Adam Clayton Powell (D-NY) has sched-
uled a meeting for today in hopes of completing action on the $1.25
billion program, a key proposal of President Lyndon B. Johnson's

Participation
WASHINGTON (')-- Adminis-
tration strategists saw nothing in
Soviet Premier Alexi N. Kosygin's
speech yesterday to alter the Viet
Nam war. They went.ahead with
plans to step up the military cam-
paign.
President Lyndon B. Johnson,
however, named Republican Hen-
ry Cabot Lodge, an advocate of
pressing the campaign against the
Communists, to study the Viet-
namese situation and report back
within a few days.
Leaving the White House with
a Johnson assignment to consult
with various federal agencies on
their Viet Nam activities, Lodge
told newsmen he favors "using
military power as a persuasive
device."
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara said after further Sen-
ate Armed Services Committee
testimony that the United States
will help South Viet Nam boost
its regular armed forces by 100,-
000. The South Vietnamese army
now totals about 215,000.
This means perhaps 800 more
U.S. military advisers will be sent
to the Southeast Asian republic to
augment the approximately 24,000
already there, Pentagon sources
said.
Washington policymakers. said
after scanning Kosygin's speech
that the Soviet government chief
generally hewed to the line al-
ready set forth by Moscow propa-
ganda.
Kosygin's report that his brief
stopover in Peking was "useful"
and helped to "clarify the possi-
bilities of further developing our
relations" indicated he accom-
'plished little to heal the Sino-,
Soviet breach.
To the contrary, there is evi-
dence that the Moscow-Peking
split could become sharper. The
Chinese attacked Soviet dogma
again yesterday.

CAIRO (A) - President Gamal
Abdel Nasser made it clear yester-
day the visit of East German
President Waiter Ulbricht did not
mean he. would tolerate any up-
surge of Communism here.
Ulbricht praised Egypt's ancient
glory and modern "socialist
achievements" in visits to the
3,400-year-old temples of Luxor,
and the giant new Aswan Dam the
Soviet Union is building on the
Nile.
But in Cairo the government-
controlled press carried a clear
sharp warning from Nasser to
Egyptian Communists not to take
political advantage of Ulbricht's
visit.
"We differ on many points with
Communism and the differences
with it are radical," he was quoted
as telling the parliamentary com-
mittee of the Arab Socialist Union,
political arm of his one-party
government.
"We believe in religion and we
reject the dictatorship of any
class," he said. "If Communists
try to form Communist organiza-
tions here or preach atheism, the
state will not accept this and will
not stand idly by."
The timing of Nasser's remarks,
at the height of Ulbricht's visit
to Egypt, was considered highly
significant. He appeared to be
reassuring anti-Communist ele-
ments in Egypt that he was not
being carried away by his con-
troversial Communist visitor.
And he was obviously warning
local Communists that his basic
opposition to their internal ac-
tivities remained unchanged.
Meanwhile the West German
Embassy announced six West
Germans had disappeared Tues-
day-the day of Ulbricht's arrival.
One of the missing men was
Franz W. Kiesow, representative
here of the Mannesmann steel
concern, one of West Germany's
largest. Also missing were his wife,
her mother and father and a Mr.
and Mrs. Lotz.
The embassy said Egyptian
authorities were investigating and
it had no confirmation of un-
official reports the six had been
arrested.
There was no word of 3any di-
rect link between the disappear-
ance and Ulbricht's visit.

ARREST 'ENFORCER'
Police Connect Muslim
With Malcolm X Murder
NEW YORK (P)-The first direct police linkup of the Black
Muslims to the assassination of Malcolm X came yesterday, with the
arrest of a husky Negro enforcer of the militant anti-white sect.
Since the 39-year-old Malcolm was shot down at a black
supremacy rally last Sunday, police have worked on the theory that
his bitter 1963 break with Elijah Muhammad's Chicago-based Black
Muslims lay behind the slaying. Muhammad has denied any com-
plicity by his group.
However, it was not until early yesterday that police charged a
direct role in the assassination to a known Muslim. They arrested
Norman 3X Butler, 26, reportedly,
a member of Muhammad's elite
guard of disciplinary enforcers. To Investigate
Leon 4X Ameer, a Black Mus-y- ~
lim until he defected to Malcolm's -IP lt
rival group, was quoted as say-
ing of Norman 3X: WASHINGTON (P)--A congres-
"He is one of the main en- sional subcommittee was granted
forcers." subpoena power last night and
Asked for comment about the ordered to launch a comprehen-
arrest, John Ali, an aide to Mu- sive investigation into Secretary
harmad, said, "We don't know of Defense Robert S. McNamara's
him." He added:, "We Muslims plan to merge Army reserve units
are making our own investigation into the National Guard.
of the Malcolm X slaying." Rep. L. Mendel Rivers (D-SC),

p.'

in

It's
the,

Malcolm X's followers have ac-
cused the 67-year-old Muhammad
of ordering Malcolm's assassina-
tion Sunday. Malcolm's followers
said that Muhammad's death
would be their reprisal.
Addressing a convention of his
followers in Chicago last night,
Muhammad said Malcolm "got
what he preached."
The Black Muslim leader, who
was protected by unprecedented
security measures, told the gath-
ering that anybody who tried to
destroy him was inviting his own
doom.

the new chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee, direct-
ed Rep. F. Edward Hebert (D-
La), one of Capitol Hill's sharp-
est critics of McNamara, to be-
gin the inquiry "as soon as possi-
ble."
This is believed to be the first
time that a legislative subcom-
mittee of the Armed Services
Committee has been granted sub-
poena power.
Some members of Congress be-
lieve the investigation will de-
velop ito) a showdown on the
more fundamental dispute over
Pentagon and congressional au-
thority in defense policy.

the

tin i~e

I

world

I

Il

legislative program.
Still unsettled is the heart of
lion to improve the education of
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - Indone-
sia 's withdrawal from the United
Nations became official at rdusk
last night when guards lowered
the flags of 115 members. The flag
of the sprawling East Indies re-
public will not be raised again.
* * *
MIAMI BEACH - Politically
powerful AFL-CIO leaders an-
nounced plans yesterday to step
up pressure on the White House
to seek a $2 minimum wage and
a 35-hour federal standard work
week.
* * *
PITTSBURGH-The Steelwork-
ers Union called yesterday for a
resumption of basic steel contract
talks and the companies agreed.
CHICAGO-Former Vice Presi-
dent Richard M. Nixon suggested
yesterday that the United States
could improve th'e South Viet Nam
situation by sending Filipino guer-
rilla fighters against the Viet
Cong.
VATICAN CITY-New nations
of Africa were urged by Pope Paul
VI last night to avoid disorder
and killings and thus show "that
you were worthy to reach this in-
dependence."
MADRID-A number of Madrid
University professors threw their
support yesterday behind student1
demands for greater academic
freedom in Gen. Francisco Fran-
co's Spain.

'decorator
furnished, fully carpeted
Un WRIYTOWERS

L

the bill, a plan to spend $1 bil-
children from low income fam-
ilies. The sections approved yes-
terday would:
-Authorize $100 million for for
establishing suppllementary edu-
cation centers to provide services
not available under regular school
programs for both public and pri-
vate school children.
--Authorize $45 million for the
training of research personnel to
work on new education techniques
and the construction of regional
educational research centers.
-Authorize $25 million for
grants to state departments of ed-
ucation to help them with long-
range educational planning.
Thursday the committee ap-
proved a proposal to make $100
million available for the purchase
of textbooks and library, books to
be used by children in both pub-
lic and private elementary and
secondary schools.
The big problem still facing the
committee is approval of a for-
mula granting school districts 50
per cent of their average per-pu-
pil cost for each child from a fam-
ily with an income of under $2000.

y4

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UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONI

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COME TO CHURCH'

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ON THE

SAB BA TH

II

DIXIAD
OLD HEIDELBERG
TONIGHT

hl

-..,y.,,. rre!

For the best in
BOOKS

Buy at
FOLLETT'S
State Street at N.U.

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_m.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Stephen J. Stein, Vicar
SUNDAY at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, Sermon
by the Pastor, "When Lent Calls"
SUNDAY at 11:15: Bible Study
WEDNESDAY at 7:30 P.M. and 10:00 P.M.:
Ash Wednesday Services, with Holy Com-
munion, first in series of Lenten sermons
by Pastor Scheips.
WEDNESDAY at 8:45: Chapel Assembly
Meeting
FIRST UNITARIANICHURCH
1917 Washtenow Ave.
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School and Services, 9:30 and 11:00
Sermon Subject: "For Better or for Worse"
ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast at Canterbury House.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.--Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
ASH WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m., 10:15 a.m. and 12:40 p.m.
- Penitential Office and Holy Communion
7:30 p.m. Choral Litany in procession and
Evensong
FRI1DAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.
Bible Lecture, 10:35 a.m.-Dr. Preston Slosson.
Church School, 9:30, crib-9th grabe; 11:15,
crib-6th grade.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting at YM-YWCA 350 S. Fifth
Rev. Walter R. Petersen, Pastor
9:45 a.m.--Sunday Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Service.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Gospel Hour.
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.-Midweek Bible Studies,
and Prayer Service.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
493 S. Fourth St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt,r Rev. A. C. Rizer,
and Rev. A. G. Hobermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
7:30 p.m.-Student Guild.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
SERVICES
Morning-10:00, Service.
Evening Service.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY - Masses at 7:00, 8:15, 9:30,
10:45, 12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY -- Masses at 7:00,
8:00, 9:00, 12:00 and 5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY - 7:30 p.m.-Marian Scripture
Devotions. Confessions following.
SATURDAY C-Confessions: 3:30-5:30; 7:30-
9:30 p.m.

Sunday Worship--10:45 a.m.
Monday-Buffet Luncheon at 12r
Was The Week That Was."
CAMPUS CENTER GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe 662-5189
J. E. Edwards, Campus Minister
7:00 p.m. Sunday - Seminar
Christian Thought.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High

noon. "That

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
730 Tappan 662-4245
Russell M. Fuller, Pastor

on Historic

John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH and
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Jean Robe Bissell, Associate Carrpus
Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services,
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge.
TUESDAY
12:00 noon-Cass, Pine Room.
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Jean Bissell's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.--Hoy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in _Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.--Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Din-
ner and program:
THURSDAY
12:00 noon-Class, Wesley Lounge.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST.

and medium.

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No fairy tale this, but a fact! ...
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the fabulous new cosmetic that bleaches
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SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Church Center located
church.

BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron 663-9376
Paul W. Light, Campus Minister
James H. Middleton, Senior Minister
9:45 a.m.-Campus Class,
11:00 a.m.-Worship-First Baptist Church.

Collins

at the

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