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February 26, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-26

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 1965

1'AGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. 2R FF~RRTTARY 1QR~

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Icers Put Hopes on Tech Series

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Boothman:
By LYNN METZGER

Diver

Deluxe

$

By JIM TINDALL
This is it!
Michigan's hockey team has
been working all season to get into
the WCHA playoffs, and all of
their hopes rest on this weekend's
home series with Michigan Tech.
Action will begin at 8 p.m. at
the Coliseum both tonight and to-
morrow night, while over in East
Lansing the Spartans tackle Colo-
rado College in an effort to catch
the Wolverines. Michigan is pres-
ently in fourth place by .021_
Should both teams sweep their
games the race will be thrown into
a tie, which would result in Mich-
igan' State receiving the fourth l

Michigan earlier in the season
when the Wolverines trounced the
Huskies by a score of 6-1. In that
game Michigan was never behind
and scored in every period. The
night before, however, it was a
different story as Michigan was
blasted off of the ice by a fired-
up Huskie squad, 10-2.
In the Michigan win, it was
goalie Greg Page who sparked the
Wolverines to victory, as he cane
up with one of his best games o
the season, according to both
coaches. Michigan Coach Al Ren-
frew is relying on Page to stoi
the Huskie offense again this
weekend.

The Huskies' leading point-get-
ter is winger Wayne Welker, who'
ranks seventh in WCHA scoring

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spot on the basis of goals for min- Last weekend Tech edged Mich-
us goals against. If both teams igan State by scores of 5-4 and
split or lose twice, or if Michigan 4-3 on Spartan ice.
should win one more game than Key Defense
the Spartans, the Blue will go into One of the biggest factors in
the WCHA playoffs against North Michigan Tech's success this sea-:

:,
,

Dakota.
Tech Second
Michigan Tech is presently in
second place in the conference
with a 10-5-1 mark. One of those
five loses came at the hands of
For the best in
PAPERBACK
BOOKS
Browse at
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State Street at N.U.

son has been their defense. Spear-
headed by goalies Tony Esposito
and Rick Best the Huskies have
only allowed 43 goals, the lowest
in the league, while scoring 81.
The Tech defensemen led by
juniors Pete Leiman and Terry
Ryan along with Dennis Huculak,
Bruce Riutta, and Mike Gorman
have been improving all season,
according to Michigan Tech
Coach John MacInnes, and have
been one reason for the Huskies'l
success this year.
The Tech-Michigan series has
always been a rough one and with
so much at stake in the final
weekend of WCHA action, this
series is not likely to be an ex-
ception.

with nine goals and 11 assists. Michigan's Ed Boothman is a
Michigan'stMel Wakabayashi still star diver today because he
leads the league in individual couldn't make the g-rade as a
scoring with 13 goals and 15 freshman swimmer in high school.,
assists for 28 points, two better As a freshman at Royal Oak
than Minnesota's Doug Woog. If Kimball.Boothmnan tried out for
Wakabayashi should win, the the swimming team as a free-
Chatham junior would succeed styler. "I was a real bad freestyler,
Gordie Wilkie, last year's captain and the team was in need of some
of the NCAA champion Wolver- divers so the diving coach, Art
jnes. Solow, started me diving," Booth-
The second scorer for Tech this man remarked yesterday.
season has been center Gary Mil- Boothman didn't just become a
roy w~ho is eighth ini the confer- top diver overnight. As a sopho-'
ence at the present time. more he practiced six hours a day.
Al Holm is the third man on "I'd go to the regular practice
Tech's line. In the last series with with the team after school and
Tech, Holm scored a hat trick. He then I'd come in every night for
tallied the first three goals of the about three hours," Boothman ex-
game for the Huskies which set plained.
them well on their way to their By his junior year. the results
10-2 victory, of his efforts began to appear.
'White' Line That year he finished second in
The "White" line, as MacInnes the Michigan State one-meter MICHIGAN'S ED BOOTHMAN
likes to call them, is backed up by diving contest. But at that time CE
the Bob Toothill-Colin Patterson- Solow left Kimball and swimming Boothman finished second in tt
Ricky Yeo combination. These Coach Rick Fetters did not get a to equal, if not better, that mark
three Huskies have tallied 35 replacement, so Ed was on his to become a professional diver.
points in the WCHA season. own.
Tom Polonic is still a question Kimball Sees Potential "I received the biggest thrill of
my diving career when I beat out
mark for the series. The All- At about this tne Michigans i d in the 1964 NCAA's,"
America defenseman was in the diving Coach Dick Kimball spot- Gilbertn e 19 4 Na sa
University Hospital earlier in the ted Boothman and took an in- Boothman recalled. He was speak-
has terest in his career. "When I first ing of Rick Gilbert, the NCAA
week with an infection that he hs',wne f16 n ebro
saw Ed at the Michigan High winner of 1963 and member of
been fighting all seasonichigan isSchool State Championships histhe Indiana swimming team. Last
Withtha excptin Mihign is. .year, Boothman edged out Gilbert
healthy and ready to take on the junior year, I noticed his poten- for, scorng his own per-
Huskies in the Wolverines' big- tial but also noticed he'd need aa for second, scoring his own per-
Huskies in thewWokvermnks' big- onal high of 326 points.
gest series of the season, for in lot of work to make it as a top.
ordertohave a shot as he diver in the Big Ten," Kimball ex- With the Big Ten Champion-
MacNaughton Trophy and NCAA plained yesterday. ships in less than two weeks,
title the Blue must win this Boothman then decided to come Boothman is busy training in
weekend. to Michigan because of Kimball' preparation for the meet. He had
and because of its academic rat- I not been enrolled in school the

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-Daily-Dave Abineri
is a key figure in this year's swimming team's future. Last year
be NCAA one- and three-meter diving events, and this year he hopes
. This is the last season with the Wolverines for the senior who plans

explained. "He is also a great
competitor and will perform!
equally well regardless of the
competition. He doesn't have the
build for a diver, but he sure
makes up for it in his determina-
tion and competitive spirit."
In Kimball's opinion Booth-
ban's best dives are twisters.
Boothman added, "I like doing
twister dives best and I know that
I can usually count on them com-
ing out right."
Early Start
Boothman is originally from
Arizona where he lived until he
was 12 and moved to Royal Oak.
He started swimming at the age
of three which is why he initially
went out for the Royal Oak swim-
ming team, so he could stay in
the water.
The first time Boothman went
off a diving board was at the age

of five, but as ne says, "that was
feet first and those kind don't
count. I used to like swimming
very much, because down in Ari-
zona you could swim for the en-
tire day for only a dime. It was so
hot, who would want to do any-
thing else?"
Boothman might be a very im-
portant figure in tonight's meet
with Indiana at Bloomington.
Swimming Coach Gus Stager feels
that "diving is going to play a
real decisive role in the meet and
could determine which way it will
go." The meet will not have tow-
er diving, but in its place will be
one-meter diving, in addition to
the regular three-meter event.
This will be Boothman's last
year of eligibility after which he
plans to go professional, perform-
ing stunt shows and giving diving
lessons in resorts.

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WCHA Standings

North Dakota
Michigan Tech
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Denver
Colorado College

IV 1. 'I'
11 3 0
10 5 1
10 6 0
5 70
4 7 1
2 12 0

Pct.
.786
.656
.625
.438
.417
.375
.143

ing. He had a B-plus average in
high, school and has been carry-
ing a B average at Michigan.
During his freshman year here.
he first dived frommathree-meter
board and eight-meter tower. "I
had never been on either before
in my life and had to start from
scratch," stated Boothman.
He learned rapidly and as a

first semester and so when he
came back at the beginning of
this semester he had not dived in
nine months.
Back in Shape
Kimball thinks that Boothman1
is almost back in shape as can be1
indicated by his performances in
the Michigan State and Indiana
dual meets. Against State, Booth-

sophomore in NCAA competition man scored 305.3 points for a first
was second on the three-meter place in three-meter diving. In
board and fifth on the one-meter, the Indiana meet, he tallied 234.15
an All-American in both. Last points for a first in the platform

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year he finished second in the
NCAA's in both one- and three-
meter diving.

event.
"Ed's greatest asset is his con-
sistency in competition," Kimball

FIVE IN '65:
Gymnasts Face Final Foe
Aiming for Perfect Slate

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By NIKKI SCHWARTZ
Five in '65 was the season's
motto of the Michigan gymnastics
team, and five in '65 it will be.
After their close triumph over
Iowa last Saturday, the Wolver-
ines are assured of at least a tie
for the championship and have
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NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION
CONFERENCE ON SOUTH AFRICA
VRIDAY
KEYNOTE ADDRESS
7:30 P.M. Conference Room, 3rd floor, Michigan Union
Professor Thomas Molnar of Brooklyn University in New York, author
of Africa: a Political Travelogue
and
Professor Hugh M. Smythe also of Brooklyn University and author of
The New Nigerian Elite will speak on
APARTHEID: ITS HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DEVELOPMENT
SATURDAY
9:00 A.M. Mr. Dirk C. Rezelman of the Information Service of South Africa will
speak on
THE SOUTH AFRICAN POLICIES OF SEPARATE DEVELOPMENT
Union Ballroom
12:30 P.M. Luncheon with Mr. Joseph B. Phillips of the Ghana Mission to the UN
in the Anderson Room'of the Michigan Union. His topic will be:
THE WORLD OPINION OF SOUTH AFRICA
Tickets: $1.65 at the SGC Offices
2:00 P.M. Seminar Discussions
3:30 P.M. Peter Hooper, Jr., of the U.S. State Department, the Office of Southern
African Affairs, will speak on
THE UNITED STATES AND SOUTH AFRICA
Michigan Union Ballroom

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only Indiana to defeat to wear the
Big Ten crown outright for the
fifth straight year. The Hoosiers
will attempt to upset Michigan's
applecart when they invade the
main gym of the IM building at
2 p.m. tomorrow,
"Indiana will be a formidable
foe," commented. Coach Newt
Loken yesterday. "They boast a
3-3 conference record with very
impressive wins over Illinois and
Minnesota."
Small Squad
Coach Loken's 16-man squad
probably looks quite formidable to
the Hoosiers. Indiana's gymnasts
are so few in number that they
must certainly qualify as the bus-
iest athletes around. Their roster
had diminished to four when they
faced the Illini and diver Jim Ev-
erroad was loaned bythe swim
team, to compete in the trampo-
line.
The skeleton Hoosier squad is
certainly not worried about an
all-around performer. Although
Joel Sultin, an Evanston, Ill.,
sophomore, is the regular all-
around man, the small squad is
forced to spread themselves thin,
and Jim Woodward, Ron Mooar
and Bob Lilly also labor in num-
erous events.
The Hoosiers' tiny team still has
some specialists, however, Frank
Knuckles, a senior from Indian-
apolis, stars in trampoline and
long horse. ,Rick Earley, who di-
vides his time between diving with
the swimming team and gymnas-
tics, is top man in floor exercise.
No Push Over
"Indiana's squad is no push
over," is Coach Loken's appraisal.
"Their side horse star, Keith Rug-
gles, is a good performer. He'll
give' us some real competition in
that event."
The meet on Saturday will be
the last chance to see the Mich-
igan gymnasts in competition. The
Maize and Blue, captained by
World Champion trampoline star
Gary Erwin, boast an impressive
list of champion performers.

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Majors. Liberal Arts degree candi-

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