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February 23, 1965 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-23

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TUESDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P '' WRWT

T X J~~S D A~~, 23 F EI3 R U A R Y -P1I ;; I l E M C I A A L A ~ ~ T W

- f *rG 1 4 C r

Officials Probe
Malcolm Death
Police in New York, Chicago Alert
For Reprisals from Assassination
NEW YORK -Police in New York and Chicago were alert last
night for reprisals revenging the slaying of Malcolm X.
The black nationalist leader was shot down Sunday at a ballroom
rally of his followers in Harlem. Last night, his missing car was
found and police were hopeful it might yield clues to the deepening
mystery. Authorities believed at least five men executed the carefully
arranged assassination.
The only man thus far arrested was Talmadge Hayer, 22, alias
Thomas Hagan. He was shot in the leg by a Malcolm X bodyguard
in the wild confusion that followed the slaying. Two other men,

LABOR GOVERNMENT:
Britain Lowers Tariffs;
To Raise Spending Level
By The Associated Press
LONDON-Britain partially lowered its emergency import barriers
yesterday, and the Labor government outlined a program for in-
creased spending to strengthen the nation's economy.
But Chancellor of the Exchequer James Callaghan told a crowded
House of Commons that the country had by no means solved its
economic dilemma and that it would have to live within its income.
The threat of inflation, caused by a possible labor shortage and
increased union demands, is of constant worry to government officials.
The British economy is now work- ,
ing close to capacity with indus-
trial production at record levels aymes Pai l ,

Viet Leaders
Reorganize
SAIGON ()-The new military
junta began changing command
of key units in the Vietnamese
armed forces yesterday. 'These
traditional post-coup rites were
launched while the future of Lt.
Gen. Nguyen Khanh still was un-
der debate.
At the same time there were
strong prospects that bombing of
North Vietnamese military install-
ations by United States and South
Vietnamese planes would be re-
sumed soon, and not necessarily
in specific reprisal for Viet Cong
raids in the south.
American policy makers feel
increasingly that the war must be
carried directly to North Viet Nam
from now on to win in the south.
One of the most notable changes
within the Vietnamese armed
forces was the reported appoint-
ment of Maj. Gen. Tran Van Don
as new commander of Viet Nam's
Central Intelligence Agency. He
has been on Khanh's blacklist.
Emerging from retirement to
which the little strongman con-
signed him late last year, Don
was named to replace Col. Le Van
Nhieu. Don was one of five gen-
erals put under house arrest after
Khanh keized power Jan. 30, 1964.
Khanh accused the five of advo-
catiig neutralism, but eventually
freed them under Buddhist pres-
sure.
lM)ilitary activity around Saigon
airport yesterday sustained ten-
sion as the Armed Forces Council
negotiated by long distance with
Khanh, who was at the mountain
resort of Dalat, in an effort to get
him out of the country.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
VATICAN CITY-Pope Paul VI
formally created 27 new Roman
Catholic cardinals yesterday. He
said two of them had been un-
justly punished for their Catholic
faith .by Russian and Czech Com-
munists.
ATLANTA-Segregationist Les-
ter Maddox's cafeteria reopened
yesterdayr under new management,
a new name, and a new policy to-
ward serving Negroes. Two f or-
mer employes said if Negroes
come in "in an orderly fashion,
they will be served." A Negro man
who sought service obtained a
meal without incident.
MIAMI BEACH - Secretary of
Labor W. Willard Wirtz said yes-
terday that the national interest
demands an immediate end to the
long 'dock strike. Wirtz told labor
leaders that the strike "is hurting
us very badly as a nation" and
giving the labor movement a bad
image.
TOKYO - North Viet Nam
termed a report yesterday that it
has been supplying weapons and
ammunition to the Viet Cong
guerrillas a "fabrication." The
comment, contained in a Radio
Hanoi broadcast, was based on re-
ports from Saigon that a massive
cache of Communist arms and
ammunition was seized in South
Viet Nam's coastal jungle last
week after a camouflaged mystery
ship in an isolated cove was spot-
ted and destroyed. The radio
broadcast termed the report a
"slander on the Democratic Re-
public of North Viet Nam."

U-M Concert Dance Organization
15th ANNUAL
DANCE
0
N
E
D

described as innocent bystanders,
also were shot.
Slayers' Affiliations Unknown
Asst. Chief Inspector Joseph W.
Coyle said Hayer made no state-
ment about the assassination, and
refused to say whether he was a
member of Malcolm X's bitter
rival nationalist group, the Black
Muslims.
The Black Muslims, from which
Malcolm X was ousted in 1963,
are headed by Elijah Muhammed,
with headquarters in Chicago.
New York police were inclined to
link the assassination to the feud
between Malcolm and the Mus-
lims.
In Chicago, however, Muham-
mad told newsmen he was shocked
by the assassination and added:
"We are not disturbed because
we are innocent . .. Black Mus-
lims don't believe in carrying
weapons and are not allowed to
carry them. Malcom was free to
preach whatever he wanted to
preach after leaving the Muslim.
movement more than a year ago."
Open Warfare
Muhammad said he does not]
expect any open warfare between
his followers and those of Mal-
colm X.
In Chicago, special police de-
tails were posted outside Muham-
mad's three-story house. .
In Harlem, extra uniformed of-
ficers walked the streets, on guard
against any new violence.
The murder came exactly a
week after Malcolm X and his
family were driven from their
residence in Queens by firebombs.
He was being evicted from the
dwelling which was purchased by
Black Muslim donations before his
break with Muhammad.

-Associated Press

DR. MARTIN LUTHEIx uNU, at right, stands at the courthouse
steps in Selma, Ala. He had Just led a group of Negroes in a
voter registration drive. King has helped more than 2,000 people
register since his drive began.
King Leads Selmia Drive
Despite Theto Life

SELMA, Ala. (P) - More than
200 Negroes, led by Martin Luther
King Jr., lined up at the Dallas
County courthouse yesterday in
another right-to-vote demonstra-
tion amid new fears for King's
life.
The integration leader's life
was threatened through an anony-
mous telephone call to a Negro
man in Selma, according to Wil-
son Baker, the citydpublic safety
director. Baker said the report
had been checked and nothing
concrete had been found.
King brushed off the threat.
Routine Threat
"It was just a routine threat,
I suppose," he said. "I did not
know anything about it."
His advisers, however, pointed
to the assassination of Malcolm X
and said they were highly con-
cerned. Heavy police security was
put in effect for King. FBI agents
have constantly followed him in
Selma and in nearby Marion.
King arrived from Atlanta and
led small groups of Negroes to the
courthouse after he vowed de-
fiance of Alabama's Gov. George
C. Wallace's ban on night demon-
strations.

"It is clearly unconstitutional,"
King said. "We have a right to
march for our freedom any time
we want. We will decide in our
own good time when we will do
It."
King walked from a church
with a small group and other
groups followed along the route
through a residential area and the
downtown business section.
Doesn't Fear Beatings
"They aren't going to stop us
by beating a few of us," King told
about 350 Negroes who met at the
church.
State officers and city police-
ment sat in their cars in front of
the church. FBI agents also were
there. Dallas County Sheriff
James G. Clark, who the Negroes
consider the symbol of resistance
to their drive, visited the scelie
briefly before King arrived.
Since King launched his mas-
sive voter drive in Selma, the reg-
istration list has swelled to more
than 2,000 names despite yester-
day's relatively small turnout.

level in years.
Surcharge Reduced
The Labor government, faced
with a $2 billion trade deficit when
it assumed office last October,
promptly slapped a 15 per cent
surcharge on manufactured im-
ports. This was reduced by one-
third to a 10 per cent rate, effec-
tive April 27.
The members of Europe's "outer
seven" group of nations-Britain's
trading partners in the European
Free Trade Association - have
complained about the surcharge,
installed by the Labor government
last fall to cut imports and reduce
the trade deficit. The surcharge
always had been described by the
Labor government as a short-term
stopgap.
Callaghan said the task of the
government is to make sure that
both government and private ex-
penditure match the money avail-
able and remain in balance.
More Government Investment
Callaghan warned, h o w e v e r,
that more resources will be di-
verted from free enterprise to
government investment.
The Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer also announced the gov-
ernment's estimates of total
spending for the budget year be-
ginning in April. He said there
will be a shift in emphasis to
economic and social programs
rather than military projects.
Claiming the Conservatives had
not provided for such programs
adequately, he said "we intend to
reshape them."
In April, Callaghan will an-
nounce tax levies necessary to pay
the bills. Levies are expected to
rise, mainly because of inflation.

To Congress
WASHINGTON (A')- Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara
was quoted yesterday as saying he
would leave it to Congress whether
his proposal for merger of Army
Reserve units into the National
Guard should be put into effect.
Rep. Richard Ichord (D-Mo)
told a reporter that McNamara
gave this word to the House Arm-
ed Services Committee yesterday
in a closed session. He said he un-
derstood Congress would get the
proposal in April.
McNamara was before the com-
mittee in a continuation of his
annual review of the country's
military situation.
Last December, McNamara an-
nounced plans to abolish plans
to abolish the Army, Reserve or-
ganization and place its functions
and part -of its personnel in the
National Guard. He estimated
such a reorganization would save
$150 million a year.
His proposal brought dissents
from some congressmen and a de-
mand by the Reserve Officers
Association for hearings.
Rep. F. Edward Hebert (D-La)
who heads an Armed Service sub-
committee on the Reserves, de-
clined direct comment on Ichord's
statements.

NEWMAN
331 Thompson
presents
FR. JOSEPH M. RAYS
Archimandrite of Jerusalem
Pastor of Melchite Rite Church in Alabama
speaking on
THE EASTERN SCHISM
Wed. 5:00 Faculty-Graduate Mass -at Newman
6:00 Supper
7:00 "VOICE of the EAST in ROME"
Thurs.8:00"-at St. Nicholas Orthodox Church
414 N. Main I
"DIALOG WITHIN THE EAST-"
Fri. 5:00 BYZANTINE MASS -at Newman
6:15 Supper;
7:30 "CUSTOMS of EASTERN CATHOLICS"
9:00 Grad-Undergrad Social
The University Activity Center
of the Michigan Union and Women's League
presents
IN THE MIDST .O*F PLENTY
A Symposium on American Poverty.
MR. IRVING BLUESTONE
on
"THE POLITICAL VOICE
OF THE POOR"

I

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, February 23, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"CRIMINAL LAW & NATIONAL CULTURE"
Speaker: Dr. B. James George, Jr.
Professor of Law
For reservations, Sponsored by the
call 668-6076 Ecumenical Campus Center
REFORM SERVICEI

I

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-

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
CHARTER JET
DEPARTURE:

1
VY

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DETROIT-LONDON
LONDON-DETROIT

MAY 5
JUNE 2

Administrative Assistant
to Walter Reuther, President UAW
Initiator of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23
8:00 P.M.
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

Ls

(student conducted)
FRIDAY, FEB. 26, 7:30 P.M.

Address by DR.! RICHARD C. H ERTZ
Rabbi, Temple Beth El, Detroit
"WHAT IS YOUR JEWISH IDENTITY?"
followed by informal discussion
Organ by courtesy of Grinnell Bros.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
j 1429 Hill St. Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel

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TOMORROW
DR. EDLER G. HAWKINS
"SOME NEXT STEPS
IN RELIGION
AND RACE"
4:10 p.m.,
Angell Hall, Aud.'A'

I11

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