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February 14, 1965 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

of 4 fr iflgan Uadgtt
Seventy-Fifth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNWVFRSITY OF MICHIGAN
VNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

"Keep The Local Hospital Open-PIm Bleeding."

A partment Periss ion:
A Necessary Freedom

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e6 *s AreFe,420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR. MICH.
Cth Will Prevmil

NEs TsPxoNE: 764-0552

Editorials pri ted in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
SUNDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 1965 NIGHT EDITOR: MICHAEL JULIAR
Afterthoughts on Junor Women's
Apartment Permission

IT SOUNDS LIKE a wonderful deal which
Vice-President for Student Affairs
Richard Cutler spelled out in his office
early this week. The sophomore women
received a ticket to freedom: the oppor-
tunity to escape the dormitories next fall
subject to the contingencies of apart-
ment availability and parental permis-
sion.
For the Office of Student Affairs, the
permission also meant freedom-from
the awesome responsibility of keeping
heady juniors cooped up in the dormitory
system.
The decision will no doubt be hailed
by both quarters. But there should be an
effort made to poke through the short-
range advantages and ponder some of
the long-range ramifications of such a
move.
ON THE POSITIVE SIDE, the junior
apartment decision indicates the will-
ingness of Cutler and the OSA to re-
spond to student sentiment. A recent
survey of sophomore women in residence
halls had found the desire for junior
permissions to be very high.
As a result, the exodus of the next
few years could leave the dormitories in
the best and least crowded condition
they've enjoyed in years. Eventually, the
dorm system may be forced into a com-
petitive situation with apartments which
could lead to vast improvements in their
services.
BUT THE OVERALL prospects for long-
range developments springing from
Cutler's decision are not as appetizing.
Besides citing the immediate justifica-
tions, Cutler offered an old philosophic
reason for his decision. "We intend that
students be allowed to live under condi-
tions which we mutually judge to be
beneficial to their educational exper-
ience," he declared.
The question is whether this judgment
will be substantiated. In an institution
caught amidst unprecedented expansion
and diversification, the student body has

been one form of solidarity. For all their
weaknesses, sororities and dormitories
have provided an intelligible unit to
which the student may return after a
day in the puzzling world of bulging'
classes and libraries.
ALTHOUGH MALE students and senior
women have already dispersed to the
fringes of the campus and beyond, the
arrival of younger women will give a
dramatic emphasis to the discontinuity
of campus life.
Soon, many students will not even have
to move into the central campus area to
find dates. They can move from apart-
ment to apartment, avoiding the central
campus like suburbanites shun the city.
Instead of affording the opportunity
to develop, apartments may become more
and more the excuse to withdraw from
the educational process. After all, if peo-
ple don't like dormitories when they're
crowded, why should they frequent li-
braries or movie theatres which are just
as crowded?
Perhaps this decentralization is neces-
sary in a system of 30,000 students and$
Cutler is being wise not to fight the tide.
He should not, however, abandon the al-
ternative of constructing a fertile dor-
mitory system and revitalizing the atro-
phying Greek system.
THE CONCEPT of freedom on this cam-
pus has too long been a revulsion
against discipline rather than a positive
establishment of goals and programs.
Cutler's decision will be applauded for
unshackling women from dormitories. But
will the void of the current residence
halls' not be replaced by another one
much worse and much more irrevocable?
When Cutler wisely relinquished some
untenable controls over discontented
juniors this week, he inherited a greater
and more subtle responsibility to stu-
dents. If he is no longer their jailer, he
is still very much their keeper.
-LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM

{

The Week in Review

At Big, Report and a Big Release

To the Editor:
I WAS tremendously pleased to
read the official announcement
of the grant of apartment per-
mission to junior women.
The bright young girl who
comes to the University with a
craving for solitude and intimacy
quickly experiences disillusion-
ment. The University responds to
her needs with a double or triple,
concrete-walled room in an over-
sizedsdormitory, with lecture
courses of 100 or 200 and a "so-
cial" library.
The living situation, the study
situation are closely linked: how
can a serious student be serious
when study hours must conform
to the wishes of a roommate, a
screaming corridor, a dorm cook
and the demands of a sign-out
slip? And until now, she has
greatly envied the freedom in
which her male contemporaries
live-a life led not by arbitrary
rules but by temperament, a life
which combines intense study and
intense friendship . . . and long
early morning walks in Ann Ar-
bor. All this-the satisfying ex-
perience of a liberal education-
has been denied her.
AND, FINALLY, I was happy
to see that The Daily reporter
asked Vice-President Cutler the
obvious next question: "When will
sophomore women have the same
option?"
-Gloria Bowles, Grad
Monorail
To the Editor:
IN REPLY to an article in the
Jan. 27 Daily, "City Council
Discusses Campus Expansion
Plan":
With theistudenthenrollment
that is predicted in the near fu-
ture and the subsequentnexpan-
sion that the University will have
to undertake at both North Cam-
pus and Central Campus, it would
appear that a fast, large volume
passenger transit system will have
to be used.
Rather than the unimaginative
idea of tractor-trailer passenger
transit service proposed for North
Campus, why not initiate a mono-
rail system through Central Cam-
pus to North Campus and back?
This would be a far-reaching ap-
proach to the problem which is
facing us, and it would also solve
our parking problem.
By having one or two large
parking lots on the edge of the
campus and having the monorail
stop at these lots, we could solve
the present student parking prob-
lem. Why not look to the future?
-David A. Hobbs, '66A&D
Overtime
To the Editor:
IN HIGH SCHOOL when the bell
rang for a class to end, the
students got up and left whether
the teacher was in the middle of
a sentence or not. At the Univer-
sity, however, it is the instruc-
tors that lack courtesy rather than
the students.
This is evident when instruc-
tors look at their watches and
see that it is already past the
hour, but take the next 10 min-
utes to sum up the topic.
Occasionally there is nothing
wrong with a few extra minutes of
discussion, particularly if ques-
tions are being answered. But, a
teacher has no right to constantly
infringe upon anothei teacher's
class time. He is being unfair to
the instructors whose students he
will make late as well as to the
instructor who may be planning
to start his class on time in the
room that he continues to occupy.
The extra few minutes of lecture
may benefit the students, but per-
haps these instructors have some-
thing of importance to say too.
* * *

THE SIZE of the University
often makes it difficult to get to
classes in the 10 minute limit, but
the selfish lecturer who uses up
all but a few of those minutes
makes it impossible. A longer in-
termission is not needed, but

thoughtfulness in the timing of
material is.
I hope that instructors who find
themselves guilty will take the
appropriate 'action' before their
students do.
-Margaret Mazer, '67
Symphony
To the Editor:
THE ORIGINAL Daily review
(Feb. 9) of the Minneapolis
Symphony concert seemed to me
at theutimecompetent and rou-
tine, but Kenneth Fisher's letter
of rebuttal (Feb. 11) made me
appreciate the Daily critic's vir-
tues: clear thinking and good
taste.
Fisher's letter is evidently in-
tended as a review of the concert.
From this point of view, it is
extraordinary that criticism of the
Szymanowski Violin Concerto is
limited to an unenlightening ref-
erence to its "incongruity" in the
program. This concerto, together
with the Hindemith "Concert
Daily Editor H. Neil Berk-
son's column will not appear.
this week. It will resume its
regular publication next Sun-
day, Feb. 21.
Music," is dismissed, apparently
on the idiotic grounds that since
the concert features the Min-
neapolis Symphony Orchestra, the
program should be comprised en-
tirely of symphonies!
The reader may imagine what
symphony concerts around the
country would be like, lacking
tone-poems, concerti, overtures,
etc. Fisher may be assured that
one longish symphony is about all
of the form of music that he is
likely to find in an average con-
cert program.
* * *
THE HINDEMITH "Concert
Music" comes in for some rather
inane comment, sowing Fisher's
lack of understanding of the
limits of music criticism.
Hindemith, even before his
death, was accepted as a fine
composer, particularly noted for
his attention to form and to de-
tails. The "Concert Music" is one
of his better-known works; it may
suffer by comparison with the
Bartok Concerto, but that is not
to say that it is "disjointed," or
that it is reminiscent of "some of
these new paintings . . the ones
that are painted by throwing the
pigment from a distance of at
least 10.29 feet."
This betrays a rather, simplistic
and juvenile attitude toward ab-
stract painting, as well as toward
the Hindemith "Concert Music."
Furthermore, it is outside the
province of journalistic music cri-
ticism to judge the merits of com-
positions of the accepted reper-
toire, as Hindemith's more popu-
lar pieces are.
IT IS THE business of the critic
to evaluate the performance, not
the work, when it is as recognized
as the "Concert Music." How ab-
surd it would have seemed to find
the reviewer of the London Sym-
phony censuring Bartok for the
harmonies in the Concerto for
Orchestra! Yet good taste de-
mands the same tolerance from
the critic who must review one of
Hindemith's major works.
-Peter Bickelmann, '65L
Escort Service
To the Editor:
SO MUCH has been said about
student apathy in the last few
months, but when the Wenley
men offer the escort service, we
women'on campus realize that
someone cares!

We would like to express our
our thanks to the men of Wenley.
-Sara-Ann Kochin, '66
President Hunt House,
South Quadrangle

1*

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An Improbable (Doggy) Tale

IN OCTOBER, the University student
body defeated Great Gunns, the Won-
der Dog in the SGC elections. The decision
did not seem to be vital at the time, but
recent occurrences indicate his defeat
may have been one of the most ominous
political events since Henry IV seized the
English throne.
There is no proof of a connection, but
ever since Gunns' failure, there has been
a definite change in the dogs on cam-
pus. Previously whenever one such ani-
mal would meet another, the usual result
-was a fray of nipping and clawing, per-
haps reflecting a difference of opinion
between the fraternity houses which own-
ed the pets. Now, however, it is common
to see as many as five or six canines
gathered together on a fraternity lawn.
No longer bickering, the assortment of
collies, shepherds, setters and St. Ber-
nards have apparently forgotten past dif-
ferences and are uniting for a common
purpose.
Undoubtedly their goal is more total
control of the campus. Whether they were
inspired to act by last semester's defeat
is hard to say, but it is easy to under-'
stand their desire for power. They are
not used to losing; after all, they nearly
always have the run of the University.
Not only do dogs stroll at will along the
school walkways and lawns, but they also
make themselves equally at home inside
the buildings. It is not uncommon for a
mutt to walk up and down the aisles in a
lecture hall, and one is not really a Mich-
igan student until he sees a green Dal-
Co fidential
EVER WONDERED about Ringo Starr
-Does he or doesn't he?
Thursday he married an 18-year-old
beautician, Maureen Cox. Now only his
hairdresser knows for sure.
_R. RAMPlAT1

matian with pink and black spots roam-
ing the corridors of the Frieze Building.
INCE NO SURVEY has ever been made
see if they are toilet trained and no
incidents of attacks have been reported,
it is not surprising that there have been
no complaints about the freedom given
the hounds. Nevertheless, there have un-
doubtedly been some close calls. The
mascot of Sigma Phi Epsilon has been
trained to attack with the force of the
Fifth Infantry Division when hearing the
name of a certain rival house. Should
some passer-by happen to mention the
evil moniker, the dog would probably
prove Pavlov's experiments and promptly
mangle the unsuspecting soul.
"Rocky," the well disciplined mongrel
belonging to Beta Theta Pi, is one of the
city's finest watch dogs. Not only does he
guard the house itself, but he also makes
sure that no one dares walk along the
sidewalk in front of it. Often stationed
outside for the night, he holds his ground
against all comers and one can expect to
hear his friendly barking reverberating
between South and West Quad at any
hour.
WITH SO MUCH FREEDOM and control,
it is no wonder that the pups are now
trying to extend their sphere of influ-
ence. It is necessary for firm steps to be
taken now. No longer can coeds playfully
allow the beasts to enter the UGLi and
then claim, "The dog wanted to return a
book."
Yet even those who favor clamping
down on canine power do not realize the
implications if such steps are not fol-
lowed.
A recent article in Time magazine re-
ports on a new fad of unusual pets. In
the last several months, the familiar home
animals have been replaced by mountain
lion cubs, scorpions, vultures, rattlesnakes
and pythons. There is the fearful possi-
bility that fraternities, always looking

By JOHN KENNY
Assistant Managing Editor
and LOUISE LIND
Assistant Editorial Director
A LITERARY COLLEGE report
calling for a curb on its future
enrollment and a concentration of
expansion at the upperclass and
graduate levels was issued Mon-
day, after the literary college fac-
ulty meeting.
The OSA this week granted
apartment permission to junior
women (defined as those with 54
or more credit hours), effective
next fall.
The implications of each event
is far-reaching and as yet not
fully determined. The literary col-
lege report, a "discussion" report
prepared by the executive commit-
tee of the college, sets broad goals
for the college's expansion and its
coordination with other University
colleges and state-wide educa-
tional plans.
As such it proposes means which
are largely undiscussed and many
of which directly counter the gen-
eral University growth plans out-
lined in the Office of Academic
Affairs report on "The Growth of
the University," completed in
December.
THE OSA decision on junior
women's apartment permission
was seen as partically certain as
far back as last year, when con-
siderably more liberal rules were
promulgated for senior women.
One immediate question is
"Where does all this lead?" Stu-
dents already speculate, perhaps
correctly, a continuing liberaliz-
ing trend, eventually extending
the same privileges to sophomore
women. Though still very much
in the future, this is not complete-
ly out of the realm of possibilities.
The OSA has already gotten re-
quests from freshmen women ask-
ing for special apartment permis-
sion for next year.
,, , ,
A CLOSER look at the literary
college document reveals nine spe-

cific conclusions and recommend-
ations:
-Expansion as rapidly as out-
lined in the OAA December report
is neither necessary nor desired,
-Freezing freshmen enrollment
at the planned figure for 1965
(3100) and admitting only this
number through 1968;
-Coordinating plans for liter-
ary college growth with "the
emerging plans for state-wide
education" (the State Board of
Education, and Romney's "blue
ribbon" Citizens Committee on
Higher Education);
-Expanding the college pri-
marily at the upperclass and
graduate levels;
-Refusing to allow growth
plans to interfer with the quality
of teaching and suggesting pos-
sible revisions of t e a c h i n g
methods;
-Developing a masters degree
program in college teaching to
help provide necessary teachers
for an expanded state-wide sys-
tem of community colleges:
-Realizing that neither the
residential college, slated for a fall
1967 -opening, nor the year-round
trimester system will significantly
ease enrollment pressures in the.
next few years;
-As a major "service unit," the
literary college must not let ex-
pansion by other units force un-
warranted literary college growth,
and
-Examining the organizational
structure of the literary college to
improve its effectiveness and pro-
mote communication within the
University's largest college.
* * *
IN SPITE OF the vagueness of
some guidelines set down in the
report, it still remains as a sub-
stantial reaction against a Uni-
versity whose enrollment is, pre-
dicted to hover around the 50,000
mark in 10 years.
But the report may have little
impact. Less than 200 out of the

college's nearly 1000 faculty mem-
bers even voted on accepting it.
Eight faculty members and the
college's top four administrators
actually prepared the report. One
wonders the extent to which it
reflects "grass-roots" faculty opin-
ion.
At the same time junior apart-
ment permission was announced,
Vice-President for Student Affairs
Richard L. Cutler said "parallel
privileges" would be granted to
junior women living in the dormi-
tory system. These will be an-
nounced in several weeks.
Junior women living off campus
next fall will be required to get
parental permission and live in
University-endorsed housing (cer-
tified by the city for health and
safety standards and using Uni-
versity rental agreement forms).
THIS WEEK a slim turnout of
men students approved a referen-
dum to merge the activities or-
ganizations of the Michigan Un-
ion and the Women's League. The
merged University Activities Cen.
ter is now in the hands of Cutler,
who will approve final structural
plans and recommend the pro-
posal to the Regents.
One principal question as yet
unanswered is whether Cutler will
play an advisory role to the new
group or exercise more explicit
control.
Out-going IFC President Larry
Lossing suggested Thursday in his
farewell address that student or-
ganization representatives on SGC,
who hold ex-officio seats, with-
draw from SGC and form a group
of their own, more directly con-
cerned with the problems of their
organizations.
Most ex-officios liked the plan;
elected SGC members and OSA
officials were critical of it. Cutler
prefers that any structural revi-
sion of SGC occur after his office
receives results from several stud-
ies of student-administration re-
lationships.

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