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January 08, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-08

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FRIDAY, 8 JANUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAIY5

v s rr !risirp Ti 111

U s"'A . £ ' X'HKLEI

U.S. Arrests Soviet Aide,
American on Spy Charges

NEW YORK (R)--An American-
born Air Force veteran, who de-
spite a court martial, had access
to U.S. military secrets, was ar-
rested today as a paid spy for
Russia.
Also involved in the case was
an aide at the Soviet embassy in
Washington, who was ordered ex-
pelled from this country.
T h e American, Robert G.
Thompson was released on $15,000
ball by Judge Walter Bruchhausen
in Brooklyn federal court after
pleading innocent.
Thompson faces the maximum
penalty of death if convicted of

the three-count indictment. No
trial date was set.
Long Series
Seizure of Thompson was the
latest in a long series of espionage
arrests in this country during the
two decades since World War II,
many of them involving Russian
United Nations employes.
Two former Russian UN figures
were named co-conspirators, al-
though not defendants, with
Thompson in the current case.
One, Boris V. Karpovich, an in-
formation counselor at the Soviet
embassy in Washington with dip-
lomatic immunity to arrest, was

ordered expelled from'the U.S.
Announcements
State Department press officer
Robert J. McClosekey issued this
brief announcement:
"The Department of State today
notified the Embassy of the USSR
that Boris V. Karpovich has been
asked to leave the United States
as the result of having been im-
plicated in the indictment for
espionage activities against Robert
G. Thompson of New York as an-
nounced by the Department of
Justice today."
Under the name of John Kur-
linsky, he was listed in the in-
dictment as meeting with Thomp-
son in Detroit in 1959 and turning
$600 over to him. At the time,
Karpovich was at the UN as an
interpreter-translator.
Co-Conspirator
The other co-conspirator, Fedor
Kudashkin, also from the UN, re-
turned to Russia in the summer
of 1963, after service with the
Soviet UN delegation and the UN
Secretariat.
Thompson was accused of serv-
ing the Soviet cause from June,
1957, to July, 1963, and of collect-
ing military data and meeting
with Soviet agents in East and
West Berlin, during overseas serv-
ice, and later on Long Island.
Thompson joined the Air Force
in 1952 and served in West Berlin,
Labrador and several U.S. posts
before his discharge in 1958.
The indictment said "large sums
of money" were provided by the
Russians to finance Thompson's
operations, that he received his
instructions by short-wave radio
and that such devices as a dis-
tinctive cigarette lighter were us-
ed as a means of identification
and recognition.
In Washington, part of Kar-
povich's duties included putting
out the Soviet propaganda maga-
zine "U.S.S.R., " an English-
language monthly circulated in
the country under a U.S.-Soviet
cultural exchange agreement. The
United States issues a similar
magazine in Russia.
Last month, three Russian mili-
tary attaches were expelled in
retaliation for restrictions the So-
viets had placed on three Ameri-
can military attaches in Moscow.
U.S. officials said that in his
UN job Karpovich was known as
"Karpov" but he asked when he
came to Washington to have his
name listed with the "ich" at the
end.
A second Russian named in the
case, Fedor Kudashkian, also
formerly employed at the UN
secretariat, is now living in Russia.

Detroit Area Seeks
To Keep Integration
By.The Associated Press Under an amendment adopted
DETROIT - Some 100 white last fall to the Fair Neighborhood
families who want to keep their Practices Ordinance, citizens are
integrated neighborhood have de- empowered to notify real estate
cided to invoke a new Detroit law brokers in writing that they do
against 16 real estate brokers they not want to be solicited to sell
accuse of attempting blockbustingt
tactics. If the brokers persist, legal ac-
"We're satisfied and very happy tion can be started which may re-
with our integrated neighborhood," suit in misdemeanor penalties.
said Cecil Erbaugh, president of Tn
the Fitzgerald Community Coun- The notifications of the 100 res-
'il. idents will be notarized and sent

TRY FOLLETT'S First
for that
Hard-to-Find Textbook
NEW SHIPMENTS of NEW & USED
TEXTBOOKS ARRIVING DAILY
Buy Some at

Robert F. Kennedy

Chairman Leonid Brezhnev

Premier Alexi Kosygin

Russian Leaders Stall
Reply on Summit Visits

Fight Splits
New York's
Democrats
ALBANY (AP)-The New York
Legislature, representing nearly 17
million people, was unable to
function yesterday because of a
giant power struggle among Dem-
ocratic factions allied to Mayor
Robert F. Wagner and U.S. Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy.
The Democrats, in control for
the first time in 30 years, could
not agree on how to divide power-
ful leadership posts that com-
mand millions of dollars in pa-
tronage payrolls.
Until the leaders were named,
no committees could be appoint-
ed, no staff personnel could be
named and no bills could begin
moving through the legislative
machinery.
Organizing Prevented
The Democratic fight between
the two strong factions prevented
the party from organizing the
legislature when it convened yes-
terday. Marathon night meetings
in hotel rooms and formal votes
failed to bring a solution.
Each side had its own slate of
candidates.
Mayor Wagner
One faction is headed by New
York City's Mayor Wagner, who
is reported interested in running
for governor next year.
The other faction is led by
Democratic State Chairman Wil-
liam H. McKeon and includes the
party leaders of Brooklyn, the
Bronx, Nassau and Erie counties,
all among the state's largest.
The McKeon bloc helped en-
gineer the nomination of Robert
Kennedy as the U.S. Senate nom-
inee last year over opposition from
Wagner, who wanted another
nominee.

. Erbaugh and his neighbors in
the northwest Detroit area com-
plain they have been subject to
continual harrassment through a
deluge of telephone calls and junk
mail from real estate companies
seeking to get white families to
move out and set up a ready mar-
ket for Negroes to move in.
The integrated neighborhood is
a long-established community of
middle-class homes ranging' in
value from $20,000 to $25,000, and
borders on the campus of Mary-
grove College, a Catholic school
for girls.
Erbaugh said if the white fami-
lies are pressured into leaving the
area "we lose the integration we
are happy to have, and the real
estate companies win a vast mar-
ket based entirely on racial preju-
dice."3
E U RO0P E
Don't assume the first tour
you hear of is the best. Send
name for free booklet on an
unregimented tour.
EUROPE SUMMER TOURS
255-C Sequoia; Pasadena, Calif.

Lo thei6 1 rokers this week in the
first test of the new amendment.

PSYCHOLOGY and RELIGION
A non-credit course taught by
PROF. WILBERT J. McKEACHIE, Chairman of Psychology, U of M
Sunday Mornings 9:45-10:45 A.M.
THE THEOLOGICAL SPECTRUM
A Study of the Theological positions in contemporary religion
Sunday Evenings 7:00-8:30 P.M. Jan. 10-Feb. 14
Introduction Jan. 10 by
DR. PATRICK MURRAY, Office of Religious Affairs, U of M

The Baptist Campus Center
502 E. Huron St.

STATE ST. AT N. UNIVERSITY

-

663-9376

.. .

IF

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Russia's new
leaders are stalling a . decisive
reply to President Lyndon B.
Johnson's bid for a dramatic im-
provement in U.S.-Soviet relations,
including an exchange of summit-
level visits.
Johnson's advisers say there
probably are several reasons why
the Kremlin leadership is unwill-
ing to commit itself at this time.
Among them is the uncertain
course of Russian rivalry with
Red China.,
Another factor may be the un-
predictable course of the war in
South Viet Nam. Communist gov-
ernments and their diplomats talk
increasingly as if they think the
United States is moving toward
disaster in the South Vietnamese
struggle and will soon have to
choose between violently expand-
ing the war or abandoning it al-
together.
Flexibility
Under these circumstances, dip-
lomatic experts said, Soviet pol-
icymakers must be assumed to
want flexibility for two purposes.
One would be to claim credit for a
possible communist victory. Their
other purpose would be to dis-
courage the United States from
broadening the conflict in South-
east Asia.
The facts behind these specu-
lations is that the Soviet line has
been growing noticeably more
critical of the United States.
The most recent example is the
press comment on the State of the

Union message this week. In that
message Johnson hammered at the
theme of securing world peace and
specifically invited Soviet leaders
to the United States.
Crumbling Empire
But Johnson also said bluntly
that the communist empire is
crumbling. He reaffirmed U.S. de-
termination to secure South Viet
Nam, and he spoke of a need to
increase trade and other ties
with the increasingly independent
countries of eastern Europe.
Some authorities here saw that
the new Soviet chiefs, Premier Al-
exi Kosygin and Communist Party
Chairman Leonid Brezhnev, may
be unsure about how to handle
Johnson. This would add to their
hesitation about becoming more
actively involved.

1429 Hill Street

Tel. 663-4129

ANNOUNCE S

SABBATH SERVICES
Start Jan. 8, at 7:30 p.m. and every Friday
Saturdays, (with Beth Israel Cong.) at 9 a.m.
CLASSES and STUDY GROUPS
at 7:30 p.m.
Monday-HEBREW, begin Jan. 1I
Tuesday--VITAL JEWISH ISSUES,
begins Jan. 1 2 Dr. Emannuel Margolis, inst.
Thursday-THE ESSENCE OF JUDAISM,
begins Jan. 14 Dr. Herman Jacobs, Tnst.
Registration-Sunday, Jan. 10, 4 p.m.
Fee per course-Members $1.00; Non-Members $2.00
BET MIDRASH-conducted in Hebrew.
Co-sponsored by Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, Detroit Midrasha and Hillel.
Thursday, starting Jan. 7
HEBREW LITERATURE, 4:15-6-Dr. Amos Tversky
BIBLE, 4:15-6-Rabbi Shalom Schwartz
TALMUD, 6:30-8:15-Rabbi Shalom Schwartz
LIBRARY and STUDY ROOMS
Daily and evenings
SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS
ATID-SZO-NAGILA DANCERS

ZWERDLING LECTURESHIP in BIBLICAL STUDIES
1965 Series, "The Hebrew Patriarchs
and History" by
Pere R. deVaux, French archaeologist and
Biblical authority
Jan. 21, 4:15 p.m. Aud. C, Angell Hall
"ABRAM THE HEBREW" (Gen. 14, 13).
Jan. 21, 8:15 p.m. Zwerdling-Cohn Hall,
1429 Hill St. (jointly with Beth Israel Cong.)
"BIBLICAL TRADITIONS and EXTERNAL
EVIDENCE"
Jan. 22, 4:15 p.m. Aud. C
"MY FATHER WAS A WANDERING
ARAMEAN" (Deut. 26, $)
OTHER LECTURES-to follow
*
KOSHER DINNERS
Sunday Supper Club (delicatessen) starts
Jan. 10, 5:30 p.m.
Co-ops
1. Friday evening and Saturday noon
2. Tuesday and Thursday evenings

p

It
!s.

n

r

For further details, call at or. phone HILLEL office.

r

I

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
LONDON-British Nazi leader
Colin Jordan and his followers
turned an election rally for For-
eign Secretary Patrick Gordon
Walker into a near-riot last night.
The Foreign Secretary shoved
Jordan away with his own hands
as the Nazi chief tried to climb
onto the platform. Defense Secre-
tary Denis Healey pitched in with
his cabinet colleague as the Ley-
ton town hall echoed with boos,
catcalls and whistles.
WASHINGTON - Harold Gold-
stein, assistant commissioner of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
said the December employment
and jobless figures reflected "a
continuation of the improvement
we've been showing . . . through
most of 1964."
He described the jobless rate
last month as "well below" the
figure of 5.5 per cent in December
of 1963.

SP

Gif2

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one week only
January 9 thru January 16
walking sheer (reg. $1.35) $1.15, 3 prs. $3.45
reinforced sheer-(reg. $1.50) $1.25, 3 prs. $3.75
micro-mesh (reg.$1.50) $1.25, 3prs. $3.75
sheer heel demi-toe-(reg. $1.65) $1.35, 3 prs. $4.05
run guard" contrece -(reg.$1.65) $1.35, 3prs. $4.05
stretch sheer (reg.$1.65) $1.35, 3prs. $4.05
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sandalfoot (reg.$1.95) $1.65, 3 prs. $4.95
panty hose (reg. $3.00) $2.50, 3 prs. $7.50

I

CATHOLIC STUDENTS
and FACULTY:
Visit the NEWMAN ASSOCIA-
TION at the Father Richard Cen-
ter, 331 Thompson during Orien-
tation Week, January 6-10. Be
'sure to be with us o~n

U I

5

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