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February 05, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-05

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, 5 FEBRUARY 1965

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. 5 FEBRUARY 1965

3U

CAUSE OF JOBLESSNESS:
Analyzes Cybern ation Effects

Editor Accused of Leftist Ties

By MARK KILLINGSWORTH

"Cybernation has hardly begun
to. affect this country-but may
take a major revolution in our
knowledge of it or a major social
disaster before we do something
about it," Donald Michael of the
Institute for Policy Studies told
a Public Administration Seminar
yesterday in Rackham.
Cybernation-derived from the
Greek word for "helmsman" and
often used interchangeably with
"automation"-Michael defined as
"thee increasingly variable uses of
controlled symbols to result in
automatic fabrication." He said
it had created, or helped to create,
numerous economic and social
problems.
Michael declared that tech-
nological unemployment has been
creeping up from unskilled groups
and is now significantly affect-
ing semi-skilled and technical
workers. By 1970, over 4000 pro-
duction systems including over 50
per -cent of machine tools will be
automated or computerized, he
noted.
Low Education
Although workers with low edu-
cation make up about one-third
of the labor force, they are over
half of the unemployed.
Citing Columbia University's
dean of engineering as saying,
"There is no future for the B-
grade engineer or the middle level
Plan Negro
Week Event
Alpha Phi Alpha and Kappa Al-
pha Psi fraternities and Alpha
Kappa Alpha and Delta Sigma
Theta sororities will sponsor the
University's observance of Nation-
al Negro History Week, February
7-13.
William T. Patrick, Jr., a for-
mer city councilman from Detroit
and presently an assistant attor-
ney for Michigan Bell Telephone
Company, will discuss "The Negro
and Politics" February 9, in the
Michigan Union, Rm. 3R at 8
Feb. 11, at 8 p.m. in the third
floor conference room of the Mich-
igan Union, the Rev. James E.
Wadsworth, president of the De-
troit chapter of the NAACP, will
speak on "The Future of the Civil
Rights Movement."
Although this is the 40th an-
nual observance of National Ne-
gro History Week, next week will
mark the second observance at the
University.
.The idea for such an observ-
ance was initiated by the Asso-
ciation for the Study of Negro
Life and History, which was
founded in 1915 under the leader-
ship of the distinguished Negro
historian, Carter G. Woodson, who
later became dean of Howard Uni-
versity.
DIAL 662-6264
EN DING TODAY
ROBERT TAYLOR
"THE NIGHT WALKER"

DONALD MICHAEL

manager in industry," Michael'
also rejected the notion that the
service industries, such as bank-
ing; trade and government, will
"be the saviour of society" and
solve the unemployment problem.
He added that leisure time would
also become an increasing prob-
lem. Since the unskilled are in-
creasingly out of work and the
high-skilled workers, who are in
very short supply, will increas-
ingly be working overtime, Mich-
ael declared, "The masses are
'loafing' while the elites work. But
we have no past precedents to
get an idea of how to deal with
this problem."
Education
"The ironic thing is that we're
talking about education for worli
when we should be concerned
about education for leisure as well.
The world children are studying
for it will be considerably dif-
ferent from the world of today in
both ways," he 'added.
Michael also said the revolution
of rising expectations, the econom-
Ic - competition of more developed
countries and the U.S.' own pop-
ulation increase add "an order of
social complexity which has never
existed before" to the problem of
cybernation.
Significant Value
He suggested that computers
and cybernation in general could
prove of significant value in solv-
ing these problems. "Cybernation
may increase our problems, but,

working with behavioral science
and statistical data, it can also
simulate reality so we can try to
improve it."
He cautioned, however, against
"the tendency to value most the
processes a computer can simu-
late," suggesting there are limits
to such analysis.
He added that such "esoteric
and complex means," even if valid,
meant a "professionalism of gov-
ernment" which, while necessary,
might mean it would be "virtually
impossible even for an educated
citizen to judge policy alterna-
tives,"
Few Solutions
Michaelalso admitted he had
few solutions to offer, noting that
while many programs are set up
to change the system, they "often
give the impression of change
rather than its substance." He
said the Poverty Program and
similar measures might involve a
lot of turmoil and very little ac-
tivity.
It is known that the Labor De-
partment, for example, has been
divided into two camps, one group
alarmed about the impact of
technological factors and anoth-
er group which feels the situation
is not essentially different from
earlier periods.
Labor Secretary W. Willard
Wirtz, who in a December, 1963,
speech in Ann Arbor strongly
stressed technological change and
the importance of education, is
believed to favor the first group.
Michael also appeared to favor
the writings of the "Ad-Hoc Com-
mittee on the Triple Revolution,"
which has been influenced by
Robert Theobald, the economist,
and others such as Michael Har-
rington, author of "The Other
America." This group has favored
a guaranteed annual income as a
solution for unemployment.
Social Disasters
Michael also maintained "we
may be in for a group of signifi-
cant social disasters before some-
thing is finally done."
"It may come, for exam-
ple, when unemployed Negroes get
out of retraining courses and find
the jobs for which they are train-
ed no longer exist or have been
taken over by higher-skill whites
who have themselves been dis-
placed," he declared.

Fraternity Reveals Building Plans
Sigma Phi Epsilon yesterday announced the plans for their new
fraternity house to be built at the corner of State and Hill
Streets. Architect Byron West, a University graduate and an SPE
alumnus said the $310,000 building will have the conveniences
found normally in apartments, the major competitors to fra-
ternity house living. The accent is on a minimum of foot traffic
and three distinct types of sleep areas that are away from the
most-used parts of the building. Target date for occupancy is
late this year.
Governor Rornney's Budget
Puts Flint Addition in Doubtr

By MICHAEL BADAMO
A charge of Communist affilia-
tions has been hurled by Wiscon-:
sin state Senator Jerris Leonard
at John Gruber, managing editor
of the University of Wisconsin's
student newspaper, The Daily
Cardinal.
Leonard asked the University
of Wisconsin Board of Regents for
a full investigation of Gruber's al-
leged Communist activities. If the
University does not take appro-
priate action, Leonard warned, he
will call for the establishment of
a special legislative committee to'
study the matter.
In a letter to University of
Wisconsin Board of Regents Pres-
ident Arthur DeBardeleben, Leon-
ard stated, "I was very much dis-
turbed to read recently in the Bob
Siegrist Wisconsin Newsletter'
Siegrist is an ultra-conservative
radio commentator in Madison)
that John Gruber . . . resides at a
Madi'son residence with known
political leftists such as Mr. and
Mrs. Eugene Dennis, Jr., and
Michael Eisenscher."
W.E.B. DuBois Club
Mrs. Dennis is head of the cam-
pus chapter of the W.E.B. DuBois
Clubs of America, an organiza-
tion described by FBI Director J.
Edgar Hoover as a "Communist-
oriented youth organization."
Gruber, who was in New York
at a student press convention
when the controversy broke, said,
"I am frankly shocked that the
house I live in should be the basis
of an allegation as to my 'associa-
tions'."
"There is one issue involved here,
and that concerns the rights of

k

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LAST CHANCE

w
t

freedom of speech and freedom of
advocacy. Leonard and others who
have supported histposition are us-
ing this tactic to smokescreen
the real question-suppression of
the right to articulate any politi-
cal point of view," he said.
Goes to Regents
In response to Leonard's letter,
DeBardeleben told the press that
the Regents would consider the
matter at their Friday meeting in
Milwaukee.
While he said he could not
speak for the rest of the Regents,
DeBardeleben did mention "that
the Board of Regents of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin has re-

TONIGHT AND TOMORROW TO SEE
NIGHT of the IGUANA
8:00 P.M.

4

peatedly and consistently declar-
ed itself as supporting freedom'
of the press and as encouraging
and permitting the exposure of
various ideologies and viewpoints
however unpopular; a position
which has been the official policy
of the board since 1894."
Both Madison daily newspapers
offered editorial support for the
Cardinal on Monday. The Capi-
tol Times stated in a front page
editorial "Leonard proves that Mc-
Carthyism is still alive." The
Wisconsin State Journal said that
it had many disagreements with
Cardinal policy but defended the
Cardinal's right to express its

I

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

$1.75

(Continued from Page 1)
Many small colleges, having
votes equal to the larger univer-
sities in the coordinating council,
have opposed branches fearing the
spread of the influence of a larger
college. The University lost its
struggle to establish a college in
Saginaw County, the Delta Col-
lege, in this manner.

.
i
E

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily Assumes no editor-
ial responsibifty. Notices should be'
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form, to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
nu*, of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
.Student organization notices are not
acepted for publication.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5
D6y Calendar
Friday, February 5
*Cinma' Guild-Alec Guinness and
Peter Sellers in The Ladykillers:sArchi-
p.m.
tecture Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Hockey-U-M vs. Michigan State Uni-

STARTS SATURDAY

versity: Coliseum, 8:00 p.,
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., Feb.
4:00 p.m., 807 Physics-Astronomy
Bldg., Dr. Dean M. McLaughlin, Dept.
of Astronomy, "Nova Geminorum 1912."
Doctoral Examination for Rajago-
palan Jayanthan, Astronomy; thesis:
"The Axisymmetric Dynamo and Solar
Rotation," Fri., Feb. 5, 817 Physic-
Astronomy Bldg., 2:00 p.m. Chairman,
D. G. Wentzel.
Biological Chemistry Dept. Colloquium:
Dr. Saul G. Cohen, Brandeis Univer-
sity, "Specificity of a-Chymotrypsin,"
today at 3:30 p.m., M6423 Med. Sci.
Bldg.
Psychology Colloquium: Eric Berne,
San Francisco Social Psychiatry Semi-
nar Chairman, "Marital Games and
Contracts." 4:15 p.m., Aud. C. Angell
Hall.
General Notices
Applicatio s for General Undergrad.
uate Scholarships 'will be available at
the Scholarship- Office, 2011 SAB, be-
ginning;Mon. Jan. 11. Applications
must be completed'by March 1. Un-
dergraduate students who have com-
plete ,ohe or more full semesters with
an overall average of 3.0 or better
are :eligible to,.compete.. Financial aid
is a factor In making these awards.
Applications for the Following Schol-
arships are available in office of
alumnae secretary, Alumni Memorial
Hall; they must be returned by Feb. 12,
1965; recipien'ts will be announced at
League Recognition Night, March 1,
1965.
The Lucile B. Conger Scholarship is
offered to in-state, undergraduate wom-
en on the basis of academic perform-
ance,' contribution to University life
and .financial need; the stipend is
variable.
The Margaret L. Waterman Scholar-
ship is offered to undergraduate wom-
en on therbasis of academic perform-
ance,. contribution to University life,
and financial need; the stipend is var-
iable.,
(Continued on Page 8)

Across
Campus
FRIDAY, FEB. 5
4 p.m.-David Brower, executive
director of the Sierra Club of the
National Conservation Club, will
discuss "Citizen Responsibility for
Conservation," Aud. E, PA Bldg.
4:15 p.m. - Eric Berne, chair-
man of the San Francisco Social
Psychiatry Seminars, will speak
on "Marital Games and Con-
tracts" in Aud. C.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present Alec Guinness
and Peter Sellers in "The Lady-
killers" in Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The Crest Travel Club
will show a film in Aud. A.
8 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre will present Tennessee
Williams' "Night of the Iguana"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SATURDAY, FEB. 6
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will show Jean Costeau's
"Orpheus" in the Architecture
Aud.
8 p.m.-Arthur Schlessinger, Jr.,
will speak on "Coming Changes
in World Affairs" in the Michigan
League Ballroom. His talk is co-
sponsored by Assembly and Pan-
hellenic Associations.
8:30 p.m. - John Farrer will
conduct and Michael Robbins will
narrate in I g o r Stravinsky's
"L'Histoire du Soldat" at the New-
man Center, 331 Thompson St.
INSTANT
SILENCE
STUDY ANYTIME
ANYWHERE
Sound attenuators as
utilized by military and
commercial jet aircraft
ground crew personnel
are the perfect solution.
For information write:
Academic Aids
P. O. Box 969
Berkeley 1, Calif.

At the December meeting of the
Regents, a report from the Mich-
igan Coordinating Council for
Public Higher Education was read
which attacked the Flint expan-
sion. University officials disre-
garded the report, having already
begun hiring faculty and enrolling,
students for the fall.
Romney's recommendation-the
third major objection to the Uni-
versity's Flint plans so far-is al-
most sure to come up at today's
meeting between Romney and the
Board of State College Presidents,
a voluntary group consisting of
the presidents of the 10 state-
supported colleges.
The University's involvement in
Flint education goes back to 1954
when the Flint Board of Educa-
tion invited the University to es-
tablish a junior-senior branch
there to complement the Flint
Junior College.
Yet the growth of the Flint area
has made this addition inadequate,
and so Flint's Board of Education
again invited the University into
Flint, this time to add the fresh-
man and sophomore years to its
curriculum. D e s p i t e opposition
from state college presidents and
from faculty at Flint Junior Col-
lege, the University agreed and
has since planned on enrolling
some 200 freshmen at Flint this
fall.

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INTERESTED
IN BEING
A COUNSELOR AT
FRESHMAN
RENDEZVOUS???
APPLY NOW!!
Forms Available at
2282 S. A. B.
I DEADLINE: FEB. 20

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1
II
1 1
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM u
I ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
I T
I The Third Ann Arbor Experimental Film Festival is coming in March :
1 1

1 /
* I
1 /
I-
Starring PETER SELLERS and ALEC GUINNESS
1 /
I Posing as a professor of music, Guinness pulls off *
a brilliant robbery unmatched even by the ingenuity I
I of Auric Goldfinger.
B1
1 /
The key is his unsuspecting landlady who, hands-
* folded and smiling sweetly to the strings of a
* Boccherini minuet, delivers the trunk of English I
* banknotes from the scene of the crime to the :
greedy paws of the Guinness chamber music society.
A masterpiece of irony, THE LADYKILLERS is eas-
ily one of the best comedies ever produced.
I !
I ~Last Times Tonight at 7 and 9'
1 /
* /
/I

... .
--

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WE ARE NOT SOLD OUT
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

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DIRECT FROM MOUNT OLYMPUS-
WINTER WEEKEND '65.

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with A DISTINGUISHED CAST
FEB.10-14.MENDELSSOHN THEATRE.ANN ARBOR
Seats at Box Office

TICKETS NOW!
-MYTH SKITS" FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Hill Aud. & Diag Hill Aud. 8

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Feb. 4-12-9 A.M.-4 P.M.
"THE FINAL FIFTH"
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Booths, Dance, Skating
IM Building Wines Field
Fishbowl Diog
F#B.-8-12
$1.00 pre-
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VFW HALL

314 EAST LIBERTY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5
f1 , "Yn iA AC T A©r .-,,r nrDA{-

A Nl 1 FUA V % HIM 1 II 1 --Boslev Crowther;

II

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