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February 03, 1965 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-03

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PAGEr. ,I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, 3 FEBRUARY 1965

PAGE SIX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, 3 FEBRUARY 1905

Darden

th e
time around last

Rebounder

Becomes

Ollie

the

Scorer

By TOM WEINBERG1
There's nothing that gets more
oohs and ahs from the crowd than,
seeing big Oliver Darden come
crashing toward the basket and
slam the ball right back into the
hoop.
And nothing could please "Big
O" more either.
"You know, I don't have so
many different moves that excite
the crowd. So when I get the
chance, I can't afford not to
capitalize on them," the unassum-
ing junior says.
Moves or Not ...
But, with or without the moves,
Ollie hays suddenly come into his
own as/a scorer of merit in the
Big Ten, as he's averaged almost
23 a game in the Wolverines' last
three. Starting a week ago Sat-'
urday, Ollie played the hero role
against Purdue as he pumped in
shots from all over the floor,
winding up with.27.
Just three days later, he notch-
ed 19 at Michigan State, then
came back with 22 against Purdue

the second
urday.

Sat-

Being genuinely modest, the I
6'T' 225-pound junior always has
an initial reaction of shrugging
off his accomplishments. "Well, I
don't think I'm doing anything
differently," as he says now, or
"I guess it was just my one game
a year," as he shrugged after
leading all scorers and rebounders
in the first Purdue game.
More to It.
But there's more to it than that.
"I really do have more confi-
dence now," he frankly admits
after a while. "When you're start-
ing every game and you know that
a little. mistake here and there
won't Jeopardize your position,
you loosen -up a little."
So what happens. Ollie begins
to shoot more, makes a few,
starts driving, cans a few long
ones, and suddenly realizes that
he can be the offensive threat that
Coach Dave Strack and the fans
in Yost Field House have known
all along he can be.

"It's a funny thing," Ollie says,
"last year and the beginning of
this year I would get tense before
every shot, so I just didn't shoot
that much and when I missed it
would discourage me that much
more."
Something Happened
But then something happened,
and Ollie says it was just a matter
of starting all the time. "I began
to feel that way during the Illinois
game," he said recalling his
meager three - for - 15 shooting
mark, "but then against Purdue,
I made two or three baskets and
was getting the shots so I just
kept on shooting. It really does
something for you to have a day
like that."
The point-making aspect of
Ollie's game is a recent acquisi-
tion, but his ability under the.
basket is one of the backbones of
the number one team's attack.
Illinois Coach Harry Combes is
just one in an unending proces-
sion of opposing coaches who
calls Darden underrated.
"If it weren't for Cazzie and

Buntin," Michigan State's Forddy
Anderson said last year, "Darden
would beĀ°even better than he is."
Second in Both
As it was, Ollie was second only
to Buntin in Michigan rebounds
last season, and is second to Bun-
tin again this year with almost
ten a game, and for the second
year in a row trails only Buntin
and Cazzie in shooting with his
12.1 per game average.
Being behind Buntin doesn't'
bother Ollie at all.
"When I was about 15, I used
to play in the alley in Detroit
every day with Big Bill," Ollie says
with a smile, "and I was bigger
and faster and could always take
care of him. Of course, that's not
the Bill Buntin of Michigan; that
was the Bill Buntin of Russell
St.-"
When the all-stater from West-
ern High was thinking of coming
to school here, Buntin was already
here and helped steer Ollie toward
Ann Arbor.
Teachers Help
"Actually, I knew I wanted to
go to Michigan," he remembers.
"I didn't know Cazzie or any of
the, others in. my class would be
here, but I did know that I wanted
to stay in the state and my teach-
ers convinced me that this was
the best place to go."
Ollie wasn't just trying to spund
like a student when he said that,

either. Last year he was named to
the All-Big Ten academic team,
while majoring in history and he
really looks forward to teaching
history when he graduates.
"Sure I'd like to play pro ball
if I get the opportunity, but that's
way too hectic a pace to keep up.
After all," he said, letting his sin-
cerity creep in, "I've got a long
way to go before I'd ever make it
in the pros."
'Just Jump Higer'
Ollie's rebounding effectiveness
is in no small part due to his
studying the art and applying the
theory of rebounding to a game
situation. "There are certain
things ;you've got to do," he says,
"but anyone can know them. I
guess the biggest thing is to just
go after the ball. Most guys just
stand and wait for an instant. But
in order.to get it, you can't wait
around. You've got to get in front
of your man or the shooter and
go up as high as you can."
Not too many can go up as high
as Ollie can. He never went out for
the Michigan track team, but won
the hurdles championship of De-
troit, as well, as placing in the
state in the high jump in high
Iowa Tickets
Tickets for next Monday's
basketball game with Iowa at
Yost Field House will be on sale
to students, faculty and staff
all day today at the Athlet-
ic Administration Bldg. ticket
window for $1.
school.
"I think I have a different kind
of speed now. I probably couldn't
run the hurdles -again, but I've
adapted to the requirements for
basketball. I really don't think I'd
finish very far behind anyone on
the team in a race, though."
Does Job on Stallworth
Maybe it was Darden's speed
that prompted Strack to assign
him to guard All-American Dave
Stallworth of Wichita in the Cobo
Hall game last December. What-
ever the reason, it turned out quite
well. Stallworth, a 25-plus scorer
for three years, was held to a slim
12, while Darden came out
with, 18.
"Stallworth was really great, a
legitimate All-American, but he
just wasn't getting to where he
-could shoot and wasn't shooting
that much," Darden said.
Regardless of how Ollie ra-
tionalizes it, he accomplished in
the Wichita game what he tries to
do every time he steps on the
floor: "Just to outscore and outre-
bound my man, always hold him
under 10 points, and win the
game."
That's quite a goal; but, who
knows, if "Big O" can keep up the
scoring and rebounding binge he's
been on, it just might be within
reach.

THE BIG '0', OLIVER DARDEN, battles a Shocker for a rebound in Michigan's victory over Wichita
earlier this season. Darden. besides being an aggressive rebounder has developed into a high scorer,
tallying 68 points in the last three games, In last week's first Purdue game. Darden scored a
career high of 27 points leading both teams in scoring.
UCLA DROP:
3 ' egains F irst in AP Poll

OLIVER DARDEN

_________________________ ii

By The Associated Press
Michigan's Wolverines forged
into first place ahead of UCLA
in The Associated Press. major
college basketball poll today while
Davidson, Duke, Indiana and Van-
derbilt gained ground.
The Wolverines climbed to No.
1, after beating Michigan State
103-98 in overtime and Purdue
98-81 for a 13-2 record. UCLA
dropped its second game of the
season, 87-82 to Iowa.
Michigan collected 21 first place
votes and 373 points in the ballot-
ing by a special panel of 40 re-
gional experts. UCLA polled nine
votes for the top position and 314
points, the latter on a basis of
10 for a first place vote, 9 for a
second etc.
UCLA, which rebounded from
its Iowa setback to beat Chicago
Loyola, has a 14-2 mark. The
voting was based on games
through Saturday, Jan. 30.;
St. Joseph's, Pa., 17-1, held third
place although it collected three
first place votes to seven for un-
beaten Providence whichremain-
ed in fourth spot. The Hawks, who

won twice last week, collected
295 points. Providence, which beat
Rhode Island 75-56 and St. Bona-
venture 77-76 to increase its rec-
ord to 14-0, had 279 points.
Duke and Indiana moved up al-.
though neither played last 'week.
The Blue Devils climbed from 10th
to sixth and the Hoosiers from
ninth to seventh. Duke has a 10-2
record and Indiana is at 12-2.
Vanderbilt, unranked a week
ago, soared to ninth place. The
Commodores lead the Southeast-
ern Conference with 6-0 and are
14-2 overall. :
Wichita, San Francisco and St.
John's, N.Y. all lost ground. The
Shockers fell from fifth to eighth
after losing,- to Chicago Loyola
93-92 in overtime. It was their
third setback.
San Francisco dropped two
places to 10th. The Dons are 13-
2 after splitting two decisions last
week. They lost to Arizona 71-56
and came back to whip Arizona
State 91-75.,

I

1l
2
3
4J
5'
61
7l
8.
9'
10

I

1

MICHIGAN (13-2)
UCLA (15-2)
St. Joseph's, Pa. (17-1)
Providence (14-0)
Davidson (16-1)
Duke (10-2)
Indiana (12-2)
Wichita (13-3)
Vanderbilt (14-2)
San Francisco (13-2)

St. John's was overwhelmed by
Marquette 78-50 and dropped out
of the first 10. The Redmen were
seventh last week.
The Top Ten and others who
received votes:

373
314
295
279
209.,
132
112
93
93

56

Ic-

I

v~o ., .+ .y y..-..y ,
. f i..

CAREERS IN STEEL
Our representative will be on campus

Other teams receiving votes:
St. John's, N. Y., Illinois, Iowa,
Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma
State, Tennessee, North Caroline
State, Brighan Young, DePaul,
St. Bonaventure, Miami, Fla.,
Miami, Ohio, Minnesota, Texas
Tech, Wyoming, Connecticut,
Eastern Kentucky, Villanova,
Penn State.

Minnesota Squeaks Past
Northwestern Five, 70-66

r ..,

4

I - w .,..

MARCH 3
to interview candidates for Bethlehem's 1965
Loop Course training program.
THE LOOP COURSE trains selected col-
lege graduates with management potential for
careers with Bethlehem Steel. The Course begins
in early July and consists of three phases:
(1) five weeks of orientation at our headquarters
in Bethlehem, Pa.; (2) specialized training in
the activity or field for which the Looper was
selected; and (3) on-the-job training which pre-
pares him for more important responsibilities.
OPPORTUNITIES are available for men in-
terested in steel plant operations, sales, research,
mining, accounting, finance, and other activities.
DEGREES required are mechanical, metal-
lurgical, electrical, chemical, industrial, civil,
mining, and other engineering specialties; also
chemistry, physics, mathematics, business ad-
ministration, and liberal arts.
If you expect to be graduated before July, 1965,
and would like to discuss your career interests
with a Bethlehem representative, see your
placement officer to arrange for an interview
appointment-and be sure to pick up a copy of
our booklet "Careers with Bethlehem Steel and

DANCE to
WASHBOARD WILLIE
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT,
Tues. & Wed. 9 p.m.-1:45
at the SCHWABEN INN
215 S. Ashley

I

t

II

REJOICE!
for
AARDVARK
THE Magazine of
Satire, Parody & Humor
IS BACK
BUY IT AT
CAMPUS CORNERS
FOLLETT'S
BOB MARSHALL S
MICHIGAN PHARMACY
WAHIR'S WIKEL'S.

MINNEAPOLIS (AM)-Minnesota
blew a 10-point lead in the second
half, then stampeded Northwest-
ern in - the final two minutes to
defeat the Wildcats, 70-66, last
night.
The Gophers remained in con-,
tention in the Big Ten with a 4-1
conference record, while North-
SCOR ES
;NBA
Detroit 121, Los Angeles 118
Phuadelphia 119, St. Louis 105
New York 113, San Francisco 102
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Miami (Fla) 100, Miami (Ohio) 85
Davidson 84, Virginia Military 78
Minnesota 70, Northwestern 66-
Syracuse 83, Niagara 76
Preiffer 81, Catawba 62
Fairmont' St. .104, Davis & Elkins 91
Duquesne 81, Kent State 59
Texas 76, Rice 63.
So. Methodist 110, Texas Christ. 92

western dropped to 2-3 in the
league.
Minnesota, although obviously
suffering through an off 'night,'
built a 10-point edge at 53-43
midway through the second half.
The Wildcats, however, needed
only four minutes to wipe that
advantage out, and tied it at 58-
all, with 62/2 minutes to go.
It was still tied at 64-64 with
3:40 remaining.
Minnesota broke the last tie on
Archie Clark's free throw with a
little over two minutes left. Two
more free throws by Dennis
Dvoracek, with 27 seconds to go,
sealed Northwestern's doom at
67-64. Clark got another basket
and free throw in the closing sec-
onds, while Jim Burns had a futile
basket for Northwestern.
Clark'-and Mel Northway each
had 18 points for Minnesota, while
Burns matched that for the Wild-
cats. Ron Kozlicki added 17 for
Northwestern.
Big Ten
Standings

In the classic off-white

. ..

I

and in colors, too!
orfe I : PIJ

I"N
t~- +

presents

IA/IT

Introductory Meeting
For Committee Positions

Inter-Fraternity Council

Conference
WV L Pet.1
Michigan 5 0 1.0001
Iowa 4 1 .8001
Minnesota 4 1 .800
Illinois 3 1 .750
Indiana' 3 2 .6001
N'western 2 3 .400
Ohio State 1 3 .250
Purdue 1 4 .200
Wisconsin 1 4 .200
Michigan St. 0 5 .000

All Games
W L Pct.
13 2 .861
10 5 .643
12 3 .800
11 3 .786
12 2 .857
6 9 .400
7 7 .500
8 7 .533
7 8 .467
4 10 .286

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