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May 04, 1966 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-04

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THE ~MICHIGAN IDAILY

Yi

ig Ten Graduate Schools Adopt Pre-Doctoral Degree

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

CHICAGO (CPS)-Deans of the
Big Ten Graduate Schools have
adopted a proposal which is their
answer to the suggestions in some
academic circles that another de-
V gree at the doctoral level is needed.
The deans' proposal is that a
degree or certificate be created
for the person who has been cer-
tified a doctoral candidate.
The Big Ten proposal is a far
cry from the proposal most re-
cently advanced in the University
of California's Muscatine Report
that a new degree-the Doctor of
Arts-be awarded to those who
had completed all of the require-
ments for the Ph.D. except the
dissertation.
A person certified as a doctoral
candidate lacks only the com-
pletion of his dissertation and his
final oral examination.
Formilization
The recognition, as proposed by
the Big Ten deans, is actually
only a formalization of the status
attained when a person has com-
pleted his doctoral requirements
except for the dissertation.
The recognition proposed by the
deans would come in the form of
a Candidate's Degree or Candi-
date's Certificate. The proposal for
establishing it was unanimously
approved at a meeting in Chicago
A last week.
The deans agreed to take the

proposal back to their respective
institutions and seek faculty and
administrative opinion and to
meet next fall for a progress re-
port. So far, only one Big Ten-
school, the University, will award
the Candidate's Certificate this
spring.
'Graduate School Dean, Stephen
Spurr, who chaired the Chicago
meeting, said the group did not
feel that a second doctor's degree
should be created. "We didn't feel
you could upgrade the master's
or downgrade the doctorate," he
said.
Spurr said the success of the
Candidate's Certificate or Can-
didate's Degree would depend on
the number of institutions that
decide to award it and the status
that the institutions gave it.
He said the reasons the deans
felt a new degree was needed were
similar to those underlying the
feeling that a Doctor of Arts
should be established:
The Big Ten deans, however,
saw fit to distinguish their recog-
nition as being only an interme-
diary achievement. "We feel the
Candidate's Certificate or Degree,
whichever the institutions elect to
call it, should be regarded as an
achievement enroute to the doc-
torate, not as something to work
toward at the beginning of one's
collgee career," Spurr said.

The Doctor of Arts degree had
also been proposed by John Gard-
ner when he was president of the
Carnegie Foundation for the Ad-
vancement of Teaching. It would
be awarded to the person who had
completed all requirements for a
doctorate except the dissertation.
If the person wanted later to
finish his thesis, he would then
be eligible for a Ph. D.
The Muscatine Report, Gardner,

and other educators made the sug-
gestion as a means of keeping the
large number of persons who are
within one step of getting their
doctorate in the teaching profes-
sion.
Many educators feel that by
1970 the teacher shortage will be
critical and that many persons are
lost to the profession because they
do not complete the last hurdle to
the doctorate-the dissertation-

simply because they are not re-
search oriented.
Schools which will be consider-
ing the proposal are Michigan
State University, Northwestern,
Purdue, Ohio State University, the
Universities of Indiana, Wiscon-
sin, Minnesota, Illinois and Iowa.
The University of Chicago, the
Big Ten's eleventh member, has
announced it may consider the.
proposal also.

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Viet Nam Poses a Dilemma
To Contested Fringe Areas

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Dailyaassumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in. TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication...
WEDNESDAY, MAY 4
Day Calendar
No Events Scheduled.
General Notices
Medical College Admission Test: Can-
didlates taping the Medical College Ad-
mission Test on Sat., May 7, are re-
quested to report to Room 140, Busi-
ness Administration Bldg. at 8:30 a.m
Saturday.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Attention June and August Graduates:
Seniors and graduates with minimum of
12-15 semester hours at U. of Mich.
are eligible to register for placement
services. Come in and browse through
I

current positions in variety of fields,
directories of schools, employers, gov-
enermentopportunities and company.
literature.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Berkeley Campus,Univ. of Calif. -
Positions in labs, technicians and as-
sistants, administration, and profes-
sional, engrs. design, programmers, writ-
ers, personnel reps. Pamphlets available
at Bureau.
Travelers Insurance Co.-Openings for
grads in claims department. In the1
Detroit area.
Warner-Lambert Research Institute-
Two openings. One with biological sci.
bkgd.; other with training in chemis-
try. Desire adv. degree, lab exper., and
knows. of documentation and informa-
tion techniques. Will consider no exper.

Weyerhaeuser Co.-Manageme
tion. BS in forestry. Degree in B
Econ., or Forestry. No exper. req-
Learning Machines, Inc.--Sal
ager. Organize sales dept. for ne
panry. Located in. New- Mexico, w
tionwide distribution.'Exper. a
er, admin., or sales manageri
able. Knowl._ in .school equir
necessary.
Management Consultants-Ar
No or limited exper. for posit
field supervision and design.
largest in field of communityd
ment. Opportunity for travel
the U.S.
For further information, ple
764-7460, General Division, But
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

NEWS WIRE
(Continued from Page 1)
THE YPSILANTI GREEK THEATRE has announced that
Judith Anderson, considered one of the great tragic actresses in
the English-speaking world, will appear in the festival production
of the "Orestea" later this year.
The production will be the first professional performance of
the Orestelan trilogy in English.
* ,. ., * .
GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL is planning to continue
most of its regular projects during the summer. The teaching
committee will continue to work on the training of teaching
fellows. The protest over announced increase in parking fees
for graduate students will continue.
GSC also plans to give continued support for the demands
of teaching fellows for higher salaries and better working con-
ditions.
It is unlikely that there will be regular meetings of GSC
but its officers will continue working through the summer.
The Student Advisory Committee on Presidential Selection
will also continue its work.
INTER-HOUSE ASSEMBLY is planning special summer
projects, to be led by summer chairman, Barbara Taylor, '67.
The IHA summer committee will work on plans for fall recreation
programs, an IHA introductory booklet and newspaper, a "Big
Sister" program for foreign students, planning of fall workshops
for house officers and a "faculty-association" program.

By The Associated Press
Civilians, many of whom wish
simply that the war would go away
at whatever political cost, are
caught in an insoluble dilemma
when the war surges around their
hamlets.
The fighting mostly takes place
in the so-called contested areas
where neither side holds absolute
sway. Or in fringe areas controlled
by the Viet Cong or government
but without the majority of the
population being committed one
way or the other'.
A common sequence of events
begins with a strong Viet Cong
force moving into the general
area, possibly knocking out a
poorly defended government out-
post if one exists. An operation-
government or American -- is
cranked up to push the Commun-
ists out.
Battalion Arrives
Shortly after dawn a battalion
or more arrives by helicopter out-
side the village, following an ar-
tillery barrage and an aerial bom-
bardment to soften possible re-
sistance.
If the Viet Cong stay in the
village, they probably will order
the villagers under pain of death
to remain to be caught up in the
fighting. If the Viet Cong are
gone and the civilians try to flee
the coming operation they may
be shot and blasted by artillery
as they try to run away.
A great deal is said of the
plight of innocent villagers in
Viet Nam whose homes are de-

stroyed and lives ripped asunder.
Much of it is true.
But there is the other side of the
coin. U.S. Marines trying to get
on the good side of the Vietna-
mese civilians in the Da Nang
area went to great lengths to bring
smiles to the faces of children
and be courteous to their parents.
Then they discovered some of
the children were stealing gre-
nades which local guerrillas could
throw at the Marines at night.
One smiling mother whose chil-
dren had benefited from quanti-
ties of chewing gum and C ra-
tions was found with a crude but
accurate map of Marine positions.
The map was meant for the Viet
Cong.
A farmer in a field off the flank
of American troops sweeping
through an enemy village waved
hopefully. One cynical American
shot at the man and two others
joined in. As some of their com-
rades began chiding the trio, the
man in the field dropped his hat,
grabbed a carbine from bushes
and blasted away at the Ameri-
cans before trying, unsuccessfully,
to flee to safety.
Villages Labeled
Villages, o f t e n haphazardly,
have been labeled enemy or pro-
government when in reality they
are neither and both. A handful
of snippers from a village, a Viet
Cong squad possibly from a differ-
ent area, can result in tragedy for
the inhabitants. Air strikes, moi-
tars and artillery are called in to
silence the snipers. The poor but
somehow neat huts of the Viet-

namese peasants are blasted or
burned.
"I wish to God there were some
other way we could do this," a
Marine officer once said. "I can't
send my men against dug-in po-
sitions without support. It would
be murder."
Deny Sanctuary
The aim is to deny the Viet
Cong any sanctuary. The ultimate
plan is to pacify Viet Cong areas
and, as the British did in Malaya,
deny hope, food, information and
life itself to the insurgents. It also
calls for relocating those willing
to back the government side.
Those in the middle pay a ter-
rible price.
Some of it is hard to under-
stand in Western terms. Near Cu
Chi, where the U.S. 25th Division
is setting up its Viet Nam home,
thousands of Vietnamese have
been relocated from villages laid
out in a crazy-quilt pattern off
Highway 1 into a relatively easy
to defend grid system along the
road.

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