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May 13, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-13

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILl FRIDAY, MAY13,196G

ItM1YM1111 11 ,~ ... .. : ":. ". II r11Y 11111 IpW1111Y IIIrl111 .

FILMS
'A Thousand C~o~'ZayFilm-

China Purge Hints Worldwide Red Split

By MALINDA BERRY
It would be impossible not to
enjoy "A Thousand Clowns."
Item 1: Murray Burns, blithe
spirit extraordinaire, flying kites
from the roof of his New York
apartment, glorying in living over
an abandoned Chinese restaurant,
playing John Philip Sousa records
on an old gramaphone, collecting
eagles.
Item 2: Nick Burns, 12 year
old nephew who lives with Mur-

ray. Nick has been staying with
Murray since his mother left him
there to get a pack of filter-tip-
ped cigarettes six years ago. He's
a very bright, attractive kid who
does a spectacular imitation of
Peter Lorre.
Item 3: Two social workers, who
invade from the Child Welfare
Board to snatch Nick from this
"unhealthful environment," are
properly destroyed in one inter-
view with Murray.

Five months before the snake
(craftily disguised as a social
worker) enters the garden, Mur-
ray had been sitting on the sub-
way going to work just like every-
one else in the real world. Then,
he discovered that horrible truth
that comes upon most of us: work
isn't fun and it keeps you from
doing what you really want to do..
So, he chucked the whole bag and
took up collecting eagles.
Jason Robards does a beauti-
ful job of making Murray-the

B erkeley Kills New Constitution

Collegiate Press Service7
BERKELEY, Calif. - Berkeley
students lost a chance last week
to' make more academic history
by' solidly defeating a proposal
freeing student government of ad-
niinistrative control.
Killed, in the largest student
vote turnout ever, was a proposal
to substitute for the present con-
stitution of the Associated Stu-
dents of the University of Califor-
nia, an autonomous student gov-
ernmnent not responsible to the
Academic Senate or the chancel-
lor.
The proposed constitution was
written byrcampus groups who felt
it would remedy what they, call
"sandbox" student government,
one without any real power,
New Constitution Illegal
Chancellor Roger Heyns served
warning long before voting day
that if the new constitution was
ratified it could not go into effect
because it was illegal.
Chancellor Heyns said passage
of the new constitution would
mean nonexistence of student gov-
ernment at Berkeley, and the re-
sponsibility of all groups being
run by the ASUC would be taken
over by his office.
Attempts to get the document
declared constitutional would un-
doubtedly have touched off an-
other furor. Statewide university
FourthDraft
Deferment
Test Slated
WASHINGTON ) (M Selective
Service headquarters tnnounced
yesterday that the foarth and fin-
al test in the current series of
college qualification exams for
draft deferment guidance will be
given June 24.
The date of the other three tests
had been announced earlier -
next Saturday, May 21 and June 3
-with more than 800,000 register-
ed so far.
PH. 483-4680
E aceOw CARPENTER-ROM
Now Showing-Open 7:00 P.M.
Shown at
8:10-11:40
The ad
A GIOat0: hd
MR.CHCKEN
ALSO--Shown at 10:10 Only

rules state that any "student gov-
ernment" must be a branch of
the administration; it must get itsI
power from the university and op-
erate according to university rules.
Proponents of the constitution
argued that an autonomous stu-
dent government, unlike the pres-
ent ASUC, would give students a
"preponderant voice in decisions
on rules governing student activi-
ties."
Chancellor Has Authority
The administration argued that
ultimate authority must remain
with the chancellor or "the chain
of responsibilities in the complex
statewide university system will
break down.''
Graduate students, many of
whom had had a heavy voice in
drawing up the constitution, favor-
ed the proposal by about 1000
votes. Undergraduates defeated it
by about 2000 votes. To be rati-
fied, the constitution needed a
two-thirds undergraduate major-
ity. More than 11,000 of Berke-
ley's 27,500 students voted.

The new constitution grew out
of a Constitutional Convention
held last December which was one
result of the Free Speech Move-
ment protest in the fall and win-
ter of 1964-65.
Liberals Pass Constitution
At the convention, liberal grad-
uate and undergraduate spokes-
men held the floor and succeeded
in passing their constitution trans-
ferring government control to the
students.
Observers said that opposition
to the proposed constitution cen-
tered on the way the document
was prepared and could not be
construed to be a vote in favor of
the present ASUC setup.
Editorially, the Daily Californ-
ian commented "eventually the
student government as constituted
in its present form must be aband-
oned. The responsibility of caring
for activities will never make for
an ASUC that is concerned with
education and the student's rela-
tion to the community."

fantasy-believable. You can't help
but love him and be deeply en-
vious of him. Almost everyone in
their secret heart has wanted to
stand on the street and "holler"
at the passing city.
Murray stands on Park Avenue
at dawn and shouts, "All right, I
want all you rich people down on
the volleyball courts by 7 a.m."
Murray has the courage to "goose
the world" and enjoy the reaction.
The Child Welfare Board rules
that Murray is an unfit guardian
for Nick and he has three days
in which to prove that he .can be
responsible. (It sounds really sac-
chrine summarized like this; but
part of the charm o fthe movie is
that it has grace enough to real-
ize it. Murray asks the social
worker, "Say, who writes your
material, Charles Dickens?")
So, then the question becomes
--will Murray compromise and get
a job, buy a suit, and throw the
junk out of the apartment in or-
der to qualify as "responsible"
enough to keep Nick? After see-
ing that he does get a job, the
question becomes-is it a compro-
mise? Has he surrendered? Or, has
he really awakened from a dream?
As ablithe spirit, beautiful as
he is in that one role, Murray is
totally self-centered. He is only
being one clown out of the thou-
sand that lie dormant in him.
The best possible Murray Burns
will be awake enough to realize
that giving up part of your free-
dom to care about someone else
frees the other 999.

An AP News Analysis
A widespread purge in the Chi-
nese Communist party has taken
on such strong anti-Soviet over-
tones that it suggests the Peking
leaders want a permanent division
of world Communism and a sep-
arate world revolutionary move-
ment headed by the Chinese.
Peking's condemnations of the
Soviet party are rising in violence
and vitriol. Some of this seems
connected with the situation in
Viet Nam. By the implication, the
Soviets are accused of scheming
for some approach to peace there,
and Peking appears to want no
peace short of total humiliation of
the United States.
The anti-Soviet tone of propa-
ganda inside China became more
pronounced during the visit of
leaders of Albania's Communist
party, Peking's small but noisily
anti-Moscow ally in Europe.
Violent Change Necessary
A persistent theme in the cur-
rent Chinese pinpointing of ene-
mies within the party concgrns
those who have been tainted by
the notion that "peaceful evolu-
tion" to proletarian dictatorship is
possible anywhere in the world.
Peking theorists insist there can
be no change except violent
change.
In singling outTeng To, former
editor of the party paper People's
Daily, the military laber Liberation
Army Daily accused him of want-
ing the Chinese party leadership
to "step down as soon as possi-
ble."
"Is there any difference between
Teng To's antiparty and anti-So-
cialist clamor and the Khrush-

chev modern revisionists' slanders
and attacks on us?" it asked.
"Khrushchev modern revision-
ists" is a catchall Chinese term
for the Soviet leadership.
The paper added ominously:
"We will certainly not let you
go, nor will we let go all the
freaks and monsters."
The terms "freaks and mon-
sters" often are applied to Soviet
leaders.
Intellectuals Accused
Intellectual leaders in China
have been accused of joining "the
anti-Chinese chorus of imperial-
ists, modern revisionists and reac-
tionaries." To hear the propa-
ganda tell it, the Chinese party is
laced with opportunists cooking up
plots and-in what Peking has Pic-
tured as the Soviet style--making
"frenzied attacks on socialism."
The Russians are being accused
of all manner of "despicable acts"
in "collusion with the Indian re-
actionaries against China." They
are being called "accomplices of
U.S. imperialism."
The Chinese army's general po-
litical department has taken the
lead. Its press organs vow "to
smash the criminal plots of the
bourgeoisie against the party and
socialism." The campaign accuses
DIAL 662-6264
AT 1-3:35-6:15 & 9:00
Is your world
full of finks and
Wouldn't you
love to put them
all down?
Meet your new
leader, Daisy
Clover.

antiparty elements of trying to
infect Chinese youth, and by im-
plication, of turning Chinese
youth toward the road of Soviet
revisionism.
Youth Responsible
"Today's youth," said People's
Daily recently, "are the generation
of successors to our great revolu-
tionary cause. The great, glorious
and arduous historical tasks of
continuing to oppose imperialism,
all reactionaries and modern re-
visionism, and to carry the So-
cialist revolution on to the end
falls on the shoulders of the
younger generation."
Youth must "carry on the rev-
olution forever without fear of its
degeneration."

This isthe line of an aging Po-'
litburo whose numbers may be
lessened at any time by deaths. It
seems to wantdinsurance that out-
side ideas, and particularly Soviet
ideas, will be kept out of the Chi-
nese party.

If-

The visit of the Albanian party
delegation to Peking seemed to be
a signal for the most bitter at-
tacks on Moscow. The top leaders
of the Chinese party, including Liu
Shao-chi, chairman of the govern-
ment; Premier Chou En-lai and
Teng Hsiao-ping, the partyts gen-
eral secretary, have joined in these
attacks.
The Albanians, who willingly say
whatever the Chinese leader want
them to 'say, seem to be "pushing
the idea that the Soviet-Chinese
split was unbridgeable and1 that
the time was near when the sep-
aration should be recognfzed as
permanent.

4
4

Read
Daily
Classifieds

III

- Ii

TONIGHT

Dinner-Film Series
6:30 P.M.
"ALL THE KING'S MEN"
presented by the
Ecumenical Campus Ministry
E at
Presbyterian Campus Center
1432 Washtenaw
$1.25 (dinner & film)
Please make dinner reservations: 662-3580
or Ltir..
+ +' I fll F OU. With
:::.% IRV
I IJJI F,
".J %3in t*rti1th

* r
r ,
r ,
TON IGHT
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR:
r Ir
STANLEY DONEN
I: SEVEN BRIDES FOR r
SEVEN BROTHERS i
(1954)r
In Color
Starring JANE POWELL, HOWARD KEEL,
RUSS TAMBLYN'
r '
One of the Great Hollywood Musicals;
" r
SHORT: "THE NOSE";
from the Gogol short story;
r 1
r ,
r IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM r
r A
UADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS r
r ,
*M m...... mum mm mm m mm.. ........ m mm ........ mm~m

GEORGE WEIN presents
The Newport Festivals
The Newport Jazz Festival
July 1, 2, 3, 4, 1966
Four evening concerts; Friday. Saturday, Sunday, Monday. Three aftetnoon
concerts; Saturday, Sunday, Monday. Featuring: Count Basie. Ruby.Baff,.
Dave Brubeck, John Coltrane; Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald.,
Bud Freeman, Stan Getz, Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Herman, Herbie Mann,
Thelonious Monk, Jimmy Smith, Joe Williams, and many others.
Evenings: $3.50, 4.50, 5.50 Afternoons: $3.00
The Newport Opera Festival
July 12,13,145,16, 1966
Presenting the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York. Major stars,
Chorus, and Orchestra In tour operas In concert performance' and five:
afternoons of musical workshops, panels, and lectures.
Tuesday, LA BOHEME Wednesday, CARMEN Thursday, (rain date)
Friday, LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR Saturday, AIDA' (Sunday, rain date).
Evenings: $3.50, 5.50, 7.50 Afternoons: $2.00
The Newport Folk Festival
July 21,22,23,24,1966
Four evening concerts; Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday. Three All-Day
Workshops- Friday, Saturday, Sunday.
Featuring: Theo Bikel, Oscar Brand, Brownie McGee and Sonny Terry, Judy
Collins, Bob Dylan, .Jack Elliott, Mimi and Dick Farina, Flatt and Scruggs,
Carolyn Hester, Bessie Jones, Phil Ochs, The Pennywhistlers, Jean Ritchie,
Grant Rogers, BuffySainte-Marie, Howling Wolf, and others.
Evenings: $3.50; 4.50, 5.50 All Day Workshops: $2.00
SPECIAL DISCOUNT: deduct 20% from the list price of tickets for all
concerts It purchased by mail before May 15th.
For information, write Newport Jazz, Opera, or Folk Festival. For tickets
specify dates and Festival. Make checks payable to. the specific festival you
plan to attend.
For accommodations, write the Newport. Chamber of Commerce, Newport,-
Rhode'Island 02840.
If you're age 12 through 21, you can fly to the Newport Festivals for. half
tare on American Airlines, creator of the American Youth Plan, via
Providence, R. 1. To become eligible, just send $3.00 with the coupon below
and receive your Youth Plan ID, plus a free copy of AA's Go Go Amerloan
with $50 worth of discount coupons.
on ~ - - - - - -- - - - ------ --
American Airlines Youth Plan
633 Third Avenue
New York, N. Y. 10017
.....,flf,..4..,....W.}«.««N!«««« .«. « « N «i A ««M ««««i «H «nfl . N .1.Y.N.W...... ....e..sM«.q«y q«
NAME IRTH DATE
ADDRESS CITY : STATE 21lP
.«.«..«.«N.........i.«.«...«...
COLOR OF .HAIR COLOR OF EYES
SIGNATUJRE,

"'

MNUSiBWOOD
CHRISOPHSP)
SnUN nEA
SUN.:"LIFE AT THE TOP"

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Nine week evening term begins June 20
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HILL AUDITORIUM
Friday, May 20, 8:430 P.M.
"Ochs is angry, clever, perceptive"
-N. Y. Times
TICKETS: $3.00-2.50-2.00 on sale at

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