100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 12, 1966 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PATE TV1

THURSDAY, MAY 12, 196( THE MICHIGAN DAILY

l a A 2.2 I V!

'{

Romney Appoints Griffin
To Vacant Senate Position

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phonie 764-0557
from 1:00 to 2:30 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 10:00'til 11:30 A.M.

LANSING(P)-U.S. Rep. Robert
P. Griffin, a Republican with labor
image problems, got an early push
for November's U.S. Senate race
when Gov. George Romney named
him yesterday to a vacant Senate
seat.
The appointment was no sur-
prise. Griffin, 42, already was the
Michigan GOP hierarchy's "pre-
ferred candidate" for the seat
from which 71-year-old Sen. Pat-
rick J. McNamara, a Democrat,
planned to retire Jan. 2. McNa-
mara died April 30.
Griffin's appointment raised
GOP Senate membership to 33.
There are 67 Democrats.
'Griffin, on a congressional tour
in Saigon, South Viet Nam, told

Romney by telephone he would
come to Lansing Saturday for his
certificate of appointment. He will
be sworn in next week.
A Traverse City attorney, and
a graduate of the University Law
School, Griffin had been rated
an underdog whether the demo-
cratic nominee is former Gov. G.
Mennen Williams or Detroit Mayor
Jerome P. Cavanagh.
Romney told newsmen the ap-
pointment would improve Griffin's
chances, but said he still "has an
uphill battle to win" in this state
of normal Democratic majorities.
Needs Understanding
The Republican governor said
there is "no question but that he
needs to be better known. There

See New Viet Cong
Summer Offensive

(Continued from Page 2)
and Cambodia since the first of
the year.
They filter down the Ho Chi
Minh Trail, not as organized units
but in small groups or individually.
U.S. officials say the infiltration
rate reached 5,500 in March, about
1,000 more than previous months,
and the April figure could have
been as high as 7,000.
Some of these integrate with
scattered Viet Cong regiments,
others form up in North Viet-
namese units.
U.S. Operation
-+ In Operation Davy Crockett re-
cently, the U.S. 1st Cavalry, Air-
mobile, Division and supporting
Vietnamese troops wiped out a
mixed battalion of North Viet-
namese and Viet Cong-the 9th
Battalion of the Viet Cong's Quyen
Tam , Determination Regiment,
operating in an eastern coastal
area of South Viet Nam.
Communist forces in South Viet
Nam and neighboring border areas
are estimated at 90,000 "main
force", Viet Cong, 20,000 North
Vietnamese plus large numbers of
peasant-by-day, fighter-by-night
irregulars. All told, U.S. sources
say, the communists have 250,000
men under arms in one way or
another in South Viet Nam and
nearby countries.
Why hasn't Ho Chi Minh sent

his army-reputedly 600,000 strong
--south?
'National Liberation'
The Communists argue that
North Viet Nam is not seeking to
take South Viet Nam, but rather
the war here is. one of "national
liberation" by local forces.
A good guess is that the North
Vietnamese leader feels he is doing
well enough without committing
his regulars to the south.
In order to meet the threat of
increased infiltration from North
Viet Nam and a possible new Viet
Cong offensive, U.S. military man-
power in South Viet Nam is ex-
pected to continue to increase.
255,000 Troops Now
More than 255,000 U.S. troops
are in South Viet Nam now, with
at least 70,000 others on support
missions at Guam and on U.S.
carriers.
Defense Department planning
has called for a total of 350,000 to
400,000 U.S. troops in South Viet
Nam by the end of 1966. This total
would rival the largest number
of fighting men committed to the
Korean War at any one time.
But the Joint Chiefs of Staff
have insisted that at least 500,000
to 600,000 men will be needed to
fight the war unless the U.S.
greatly steps up the air war in
the north and bombs Hanoi, Hai-
phong and other strategic points.

are impressions not well-founded
that need to be corrected. The
character of his action on labor
legislation needs to be under-
stood."
Griffin, a five-term congress-
man, is best known as coauthor
of the Landrum-Griffin Act, 1959
labor legislation which tightened
union accounting procedures,
among other things.
Labor leaders in Michigan--an
industrial state with a powerful
union political vote--have long at-
tacked Griffin on that issue.
McNamara was known as the
voice of labor and the elderly in
the Senate, and Williams said
Griffin had opposed many causes
he championed, adding: "The
people of Michigan have a right
to expect a better replacement for
Sen. McNamara."
Michigan's Loss'
Cavanagh, on a trade tour of
Europe, messaged from London
that "it is Michigan's loss that
Gov. Romney decided to fill the
Senate vacancy on the basis of
expediency. I am sorry the gov-
ernor failed to choose on the basis
of what is best for Michigan."
Griffin said from Saigon he is
confident experience gained in the
House "will prove most helpful as
I participate in the vital work of
the U.S. Senate."
House vacancies cannot be filled
by appointment, and Griffin said
Romney had indicated he would
call no 9th District election before
the regular general election in
November.
Heavy Favorite
The governor said he would ac-
tively campaign for Griffin and
added that he probably would an-
nounce his own plans this month.
He is expected to declare for a
third term and is heavily favored.
Romney's own appeal as a po-
tential 1968 GOP presidential can-
didate will be partly riding with
Griffin as national Republican
figures observe how successful
Romney is in providing coattails.
The appointment was delayed
until Griffin had left on his House
subcommittee's tour of Viet Nam,
which is expected to provide him
with some campaign ammunition.
The appointment is in effect
until Dec. 1. In November, voters
will ballot separately on the por-
tion of the term running from
Dec. 1 until Jan. 3, and on a new
six-year term, beginning Jan. 3.

HAPPY SUMMER to Everyone In Love YARD WORK, $1.25 hr. Transportation
F48 needed. NO 5-5201. H37

HI HANDSOME!! Would you beleave a
Michigan Daily? Fi
TIME ON YOUR HANDS?
Do something creative. Join The Mich-;
igan Daily business, editorial or sports"
staff. Few hours; lots of fun, F
ANN ARBOR'S best buy on a diamond
engagement ring. Check it! Austin
Diamond, 1209 S. University. 663-7151
F
DATING is more enjoyable with
THE RIGHT PERSON
IBM Computer AND personal
interviews help us arrange
DATES YOU'LL REALLY ENJOY
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
Call 662-4867, write 216 S. State
- for free brochure or interview
F
RENT Your TV from NEJAC
Zenith 19 in. all channel portables for
only $10 per month. FREE service and
delivery. Phone 662-5671. F
2 NURSES want 3rd female roommate
Phone 665-5022 after 4 p.m. F44
WEATHER GOT YOU DOWN?
Brighten up your life with a visit
to:j
RALPH'S MARKET
Open 9 a.m. to Midnight
709 Packard
SUMMER SUBLET '
WE HELP PUT ourselves thru grad
school running this ramshackle
rooming house. Wow here's your
chance. All you need is plenty of cash
and derring do. Call Bob Greenberg,
662-8559. U27
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY - 3 girls to
share 4 bdrm. flat. 10 min. from cam-
pus. Spring and/or summer. $27.50
mo. per person, 761-7508, .U24
WANT ROOMMATE to share mod, apt,
with law student for summer. Call
662-1058 or 764-9454, ask for Ron. U25
SUMMER FUN INCLUDES-Distinctive
apt. in house with cupola, screened
porch, septagonally round living room.
For 1 or 2, near S.U. ad Church.
662-1281. U21
MALE GRAD roommate wanted. Own
bdrm., swimming pool; near campus;
air-cond. Reasonable. Call Tom, 722-
9210 days, evenings 663-3283. U14
ON CAMPUS-2-man suite, furnished,
Summer rates. $65 per month, utili-
ties incl. Mr. Kerr, 663-2108. U9
FURNISHED RMS and Apts. (men).
Linens, and kitchen privileges. Spe-
cial summer rate. Telephone 761-0053.
U2
LARGE 2 MAN, furn., 726 Oakland,
Available June 1 or later. Call 234-
0256. Flint. U1
2 MEN NEEDED to fill mod. air-cond.
3-man. Cal 665-7849. U17
LARGE 2 BDRM. furn. apt. $50 apiece
for 2, util. paid. 665-2165, at 213
E. Washington. U18
CAMPUS-HOSPT. Studio, furn., sum-
mer. $65. N08-6906. U7
SUMMER SUBLET-4-man house avail-
able May to Aug. near campus, low
rent. Call evenings, 662-8366. If no
answer call 764-6268. U20
GIRL TO SHARE 2 bdrm Island Dr.
apt., air-cond., pool, parking, fac.,
etc. $70 per mo. 663-9181 after 5. U3
REDUCED-campus-hospt. area, studio
rms or suites for men or women. Very
attractively decorated and turn. Some
paneled. House, refrigerator and
phone. Leases thru June or Aug. $7
to $10 a week. 665-0925 or 662-7992.
U5
WANTED TO RENT
FURN. GARDEN apt. or house to sublet
for summer (Juneh25-Aug. 25) for
parents of two children. Write Box
51, 420 Maynard St., A.A. L50
UNFURNISHED 3 bedroom house or
apartment in district with good grade
school. Desire occupancy about June
15th. Prof. and family with Ann
Arbor references. Please write full
details to William Cherniak, 710 E.
Hacienda Drive, Yuma, Arizona.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 63DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 average words to a line,
Classified deadline, 2:30 daily.
Phone 764-0557
PERSONAL
HEY Handsome! How's 'bout a letter?
P12
LARGE APARTMENT NEEDS one or
two more girls. Close to campus,
Very cheap. 665-6329. F9

APT.' 2 rm., bath, kitchenette, garage.
In exchange for maintepance work.
Grad students only. NO 3-2588. H42
SALESMAN to start June 1st. Profes-
sional opportunity, married422-30.
Bacheros degree. Phone 453-4030 for
interview. H41
CHILD CARE, supervise 4 children ages
5 to 9. AM or afternoons. Now until
Sept. Crest and Liberty. $1.25, prefer
experience. Call 663-1875 after 8 p.m.
H34
MECH. ENG. Student, preferably in 3
yr. most apt to qualify as spare time
participant in high level classified
project. Write fully. Box 50, The Mich-
igan Daily. H40
WANTED-Student to assist in physical
care of professor in wheel chair.
Tasks incl, getting him into car. Stu-
dent must be available from 7 a.m.
to 9 a.m., 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. daily
except Sun. Wed., 12:15 p.m. to 3:15
p.m. Room and loard in exchange.
NO 2-1585 after 5. H35
SOMEONE for LAWN WORK. Exper-
ienced. Own transportation. 663-2256.
H39
FULL OR PART TIME, all training
furnished, work any hours available.
Call NO 2-6274. H31
LINOTYPE OPERATOR. Job shop.
Steady work, fringe benefits, good
pay. Jackson Printing Co., 3136 Fran-
cis, Jackson, Mich. 713-2705. H38
BABYSITTER WANTED by fac. wife.
Mon, thru Fri. afternoons. Four chil-
dren in school; one 4 yr. old, at home.
Between Campus and Burns Park. NO
3-8714. H36
COLLEGE STUDENTS-Part time eve-
ning work at Ypsi-Arbor Lanes as pin
jumper. Apply in the evening. H33
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive; $7, $10, and $12 .for
Rh negative. Hours: Mon. thru Thurs.
9-4; Fri. 1-7. 18-21 years old need
parent's permission. 483-1894,
YPSILANTI
Detroit Blood Service
404 W. Michigan
ON-CAMPUS AND SUMMER
JOBS AVAILABLE
A great opportunity for aggressive
college students to earn a high in-
come distributing material to college
campuses all over the United States.
Combine summer travel with large
profits, or work part-time on your
own campus. Fall jobs are also avail-
able. Contact: Collegiate-Dept. D, 27
East 22 St., New York, N.Y. 10010.
H44

HELP WANTED
FEMALE STUDENT wanted to work for
handicapped student from Sat ,12
to Sun. 6 p.m. $15 weekend, Call
665-2482. H48
$1 PER HR. Tues. 9:45-11:15 a.m. Care
for 3 year old. Near campus. 668-8442.
H47
NURSERY School teacher wanted, Part-
time. Call 665-5148. H45
PART TIME-FULL TIME
NATIONAL AAA-1 CO.
Expanding this area. Ambitious men to
sell on new and old accounts. High
earnings plus bonus and scholarships,
car required. For appointment call
Mr. Petterson, 764-7460 SAB. H46

HELP WANTED
Male & Female Help Wanted
OPENINGS FOR CHILD CARE
WORKERS
AT
PLYMOUTH STATE HOME &
TRAINING SCHOOL
Child Care Workers A, 21 yrs., a
minimum of 56 semester hours com-
pleted and currently enrolled in a
college or university. Salary ranges
from $4906,$5533 depending on edu-
cation.
Child Care Worker B, 19 yrs., a mini-
mum of 28 semester hours completed
and currently enrolled in a college or
university. Salary $4363 per annum.
To work with young retarded and an
excellent opportunity to combine
work and practical field experience
for those interested in. careers in
milieu treatment, Education, Social
Work, Speech Therapy, and "related
fields. For further information, con-
tact Personnel Office, Plymouth State
Home, 453-1500, Mon. thru Fri., 8-4:30.
H43
PART TIME
Multi-Million Dollar Company hiring
for part time sales work. Earnings in
excess of $3.00 per hour. This is not
pots-knives-books or any of that door
to door nonsense. This company in
expanding all across the nation, con-
sequently this could be more than
just a part time job for the right
person. If you're 20, have use of a
car, and are bondable write William
D. Nichols, 3372 Washtenaw Ave., Ann
Arbor, Mich.
BUSINESS SERVICES
HAIR REMOVAL
Done by electrolysis. Information avail-
able through U. Hospital Derm. Clinic,
764-5146. J19
INDECKS
INFORMATION RETRIEVAL
KITS
Invaluable for writing course papers
or theses, reviewing for exams, doing
research projects in the arts, sciences
or humanities.
Call Geo. Gitzendanner, 761-3607,
after 6 p.m. or write 536 S. Forest,
19A, for free demonstration. J18
LOST AND FOUND
LOST on South U.-One pair of con-
tact lenses in a white case. If found,
please call Betsy, 764-0562. A26
LOST-Reward for information regard-
ing a brown female long hair stripped
cat lost May 5, in the Forest-Forest
Ct. area. She's needed desperately to
nurse her new born kittens. 663-4162.
A25
LOST-2 boxes April 26 at S. Quad. Any
information call Ann, 764-4944. Re-
ward. A24
LOST-Rug 10x10 and large shield, on
S. Division on Thursday. 688-8442.
A23
Meow

TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING TO NEW YORK May 12 or
13. Riders wanted. Call Randy, 761-
6070. G25
FOR SALE
ONE DISCOUNT Ticket to Europe.
Round trip Det.-Lon., May 28-Aug 15.
Will take best, reasonable offer. 761-
2135. Between 12-1. B39
SACRIFICE - Must sell boy's bicycle
with basket, new chain, and new tire.
$15 or best offer, 665-9327. B38
FOR SALE-1964 Volskwagen. Spotless.
Has everything. $1250. Call after 5,
668-7107. B37
VOSS port, typewriter, unused. Grad.
present. Will sacrifice, $80. Bob, 665-
0729. B35
BUCL HELMET, white, new, unused.
Will sacrifice, $35. Call Bob, 665-0729.
B36
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE INC.
518 William (Maynard House)
MUSIC-Domestic and Foreign
Music books and all accessories
NO 2-5579
1 X17
BANJOS, GUITARS, AND BONGOS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
1965 YAMAHA - Brand. new, never
driven. 80cc. 662-3651. Z26
'65 YAMAHA. 80cc, 800 miles. Stored
thru winter, with helmet, cover. $295.
761-2744 after 8 p.m. Z22
HONDA 160, Extra equipment. NO 3-
1770. Z23
HONDA C-100, only 416 miles. Stored
all winter. NO 3-9623. Z24
'64 DUCATTI 125. Best offer. Rob Eifler,
662-9890, 12 to 12:30, 6 to 7 p.m. Z25
FOR SALE-Honda 50, just tuned im-
maculate condition. Asking $190. Call
Ed, 12-3 only at 764-0558. Z21
BEFORE YOU BUY ...
Can you get the parts for it? Best
inventory in the area is Hondaof
Ann Arbor, Z19

USED CARS
'64 MG-TD. Body excellent, engine
good. $750. ONO, Miller & Ashley.
668-9829. IN37
FOR SALE-$450. '60 Triumph TR3
Hardtop (detachable). Must be sold
this week. Triced to Go, Contact
Mark Glenden, 663-9519. N35
VW, '64, RED, 16,000 males, radio, white-
walls. 663-6105 after 6. N86
1961 MGA Cony. Jim Langworthy, 801
Catherine. 761-3987. N32
FOR RENT
ONE ROOM for single woman. Kitchen
facilities. Rent $50, NO 2-6987. C8
FOR RNT-Immed. Occupancy-Fur-
nished 2 bdrm. apt.. Ideal for 2-3
students or married couple. Off street
parking, attic storage facilities. Resi-
dential area: 405 Snyder (across 'from
Stadium). MUST , SACRIFICE FOR
$110/mo. Call 663-7764 after 6 p.m. C7
PRIVATE ROOM, bath and entrance in
four man house. $45. 662-8186. C6
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI's Galore!
LEVI'S SLIM-FITS--$4.50
"White," and 5 Colors
For "Guys and Gals"
Cord. SLIM-FITS-$5.98
LEVI'S STA-PREST PANTS
Never Needs Ironing
Asst'd. Colors-$6.98

LEVI JACKETS
"White"-$6.98
Blue Denim-$5.99

NICHOLSON M/C SALES
Authorized dealer for TRIUMPH
YAMAHA - BMW - GILERA. 224
First. Phone 662-7409.

S.
Zj

LEVI'S Superslim's-$4.98
LEVI'S Dungarees-$4.49
S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI'S
For Gals and Guys
"White"-$5.98
TURTLENECKS-$1.69
(15 Colors)
Open Mon. & Fri. Nights
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

GIRLS -- Ever try to clean a fouled
spark plug? Or mix messy oil with
the gasoline when the man fills your
tank? You don't have to with a
Honda. Honda's are 4 stroke engines
that's why. Only the nicest people
ride Honda, or sell them. Tell the
man you want a nice clean Honda
motor bike at Honda of Ann Arbor.
Z26

U.S. Prepares More Lenient
Trade Pacts with Communists

DOWNTOWN HONDA
Wenk Soles & Services, Inc.

WASHINGTON (M)-The John-
son administration gingerly asked
Congress yesterday for power to
negotiate more lenient trade
agreements with the Soviet Union
and the Communist satellites in
5rope, except East Germany.
Since 1964, President Johnson
has been trying to soften the
ground for legislation to ease
East-West trade barriers as part
of his campaign to build new
bridges of peaceful contact with
the Soviet bloc.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
said the new bill would give the
President "a vital instrument of
negotiation-so that we may grasp
opportunities that are opening up
to us in our relations with the
Soviet Union and countries of
Eastern Europe."
Uncertain Fate
But by not submitting the
measure until this relatively late
date, the administration virtually
insured that it would not be passed
this year. Some figured that after
extended hearings, it might be-
come law in 1967. Even then, its
fate is uncertain.
The bill would end a long-
standing postwar ban on most-
favored-nation treatment to Euro-
pean Communist states except for
Poland and Yugoslavia, which now
enjoy it, and East Germany, which
would remain exempt.
Under most - favored - nation
clauses, which generally cover U.S.
commerce with the non-Commun-
ist countries, each party accords to
the other any lowered tariffs it
has negotiated with a third coun-
try.
Sensitive to Criticism
Administration strategists have
been sensitive to criticism of their
proposal in this congressional elec-
tion year, They said they would
welcome public hearings.
So far, the tariff-writing ┬░House
Ways and Means Committee,
which would be the first to take
Up the bill, has not set a date for
its consideration.
Rusk, in a special message ac-
companying the bill draft, listed
both benefits to the United States
and safeguards. As the secretary of
state put it: "windows in Eastern
Europe are being gradually open-

limitation policies, "which once
served our national interest, no
longer do so adequately."
Outdated and Rigid
Rusk said U.S. policy has be-
come outdated and rigid, America
finds itself the only major West-
ern country to have its hands tied
on lowering tariffs in East-West
trade, and the President's in-
ability to negotiate on this "sharp-
ly reduces his power to use the
great economic power of our trade
as a bargaining instrument."
Washington thus risks losing
important opportunities to in-
fluence events inside the Commun-
1st bloc and leaves the field open
for exploitation by others, the
secretary said.
U.S. determination to resist Red
expansion by force as in Viet
Nam, Rusk said, is only a part of
American strategy. He said the
other part is to make clear to the
Communists that their best in-
terests lie in peaceful relations, in-
cluding economic contacts.
Some Nations Exempted
In line with U.S. policy on this
score, the bill specifically rules
out Communist Cuba, China,
North Korea and North Viet Nam
from most-favored-nation bene-
fits. East Germany is also exempt-
ed, because the United States does
not recognize the Communist re-
gime there.

Aside from domestic political
opposition, the administration has
other reasons for not pushing now
for quick action on East-West1
trade liberalization.
For one thing, U.S. relations
with the Communist capitals have
been clouded by the dispute over
Viet Nam. For another, the Reds
have been slow in many instances
in moving toward settlement of
economic issues outstanding with
the United States.
Future Prospects
Even if the bill were enacted
into law now, U.S. officials said
they would not immediately enter
into most-favored-nation negotia-
tions with all the East European
governments.
American trade with the bloc
has been tiny in relation to other
commerce and some doubt there
would be a sharp increase even
without tariff problems. Applying
most - favored - nation treatment
might reduce U.S. customs on im-
ports from the bloc by an average
of 20 to 30 per cent, officials es-
timated.
American exports to the Soviet
Union and East Europe totaled
about $139 million last year, out
of total U.S. exports of $27.3 bil-
lion. The non-Communist world as
a whole exported an estimated
$5.5 billion to the Soviet bloc last
year.

t"

L

.I

I

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE--SAVE TIME-IMPROVE CONCENTRATION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual ma-
terial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish--in your re-
quired reading, and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developing ANY dependence upon external equipment
in reading. The new reading skill is permanently retained.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adjacent to the U. of M. campus, beginning on MAY 24. This is our Sixth

If you do you'll get right over to Ann Arbor Bank to open your
Specialcheck checking account. Why? Because it's the most eco-
nomical checking account available for you if you write just a
few checks a month. With Specialcheck account you just pay 10c
for each check you write and that's all! There's no service charge
or minimum balance required, and no charge in advance for
check-books. See Ann Arbor Bank about your Specialcheck check-
ing account.

#.a" 6 "*w 8 f"" 10
a } * s**"" f
""w".t /6 Yt
w" t i~tbtfli~~q#+iM~tq# ., . at,, e
s,
f

II

0

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan