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July 29, 1966 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-29

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY JITLV 209_ 1 9iftfi

PAGE SIX TUE MICHIGAN DAILY I~'RTDAV JTTJV 9~I io~w

a ALVJL"ZXJLIJl/LrZ f7f 1JUC

Cazzie Still Undecide(

By BUD WILKINSON
Sports Editor
Cazzie Russell, pursued by no
less than three basketball teams,
one baseball and one football
team, has yet to decide who will
obtain his services.
Although Russell's choice is pri-
marily between playing for the
Harlem Globetrotters, the Yew
York Knicks of the NBA or of
playing a year of AAU ball, rep-
resentatives of the other two
hajor pro sports have sounded
him out.
Cazzie was the number one
choiceof the Knicks after they
won a coin toss with the Detroit
Pistons for the privilege of the
first n ick.
Shortly after being contacted
by the Knicks, the Harlem Globe-
trotters approached him with what
he termed a "reai good offer."
Various published reports have
placed the Knicks offer as high
as $38,000 and the Trotters' bid
as high as $45,000. but Cazzie de-
clined to reveal the exact amount
of the offers.
Cazzie sees a year's tour with
the Globetrotters or a season of
playing AAU ball as "a chance to
gain experience, a chance to learn
to handle the bal better, to dribble
better," and is seriously consider-
ing the two possibilities.
BasebaUl Maybe?
Cazzie, who has played baseball
since he was in grade school and
"loves the sport" worked out with
the Chicago White Sox in June.
When the baseball draft was com-
pleted later in the month, the
Kansas City Athletics pickced up
Russell for one of its minor league
teams. Owner Charles Finley was;
quoted as saying he would make
every effort to sign Russell to a!
contract.
Cazzie revealed that he had

-Daily-Thomas R. C
CAZZIE RUSSELL WARMS UP at first base for the Ann Arb
Travelers. Russell has been playing baseball with the Travele
throughout the summer, and a career in baseball is one of t
possibilities for the future that he is considering.

dCedar Bend, BursleNewU ousin
Rises To Meet Needs of North CaMus
'By MICHAEL HEF'FER . .
Six hundred students will move.}aakr
into Cedar Bend housing on North
aCampus in thed fall A year later
1800 more will move into the rest
of Cedar Bend and into Bursley
Hall housing,
Dircto ofHouingJohn Feld-
kamp reports that the 600 spaces
available in Cedar Bend for the
fall have already been taken, adds
that he is "afraid we will have to
turn some students away" if they
apply late,
Cedar Bend, a coeducational
housing unit for upperclassmen
and graduate, students, may not be
called Cedar Bend for long. While
located between Cedar Bend Drive
and (Vera) Baits Drive, Cedar
Bend buildings are actually on
Name Change
It is therefore expected that
Sdthe Regents will change its name
from Cedar Ben housing to Vera
Baits housing at their meeting
today. Vera Baits is the name of
a former Regent.
Cedar Bend housing consists of
single, double and triple suites,
plus some one-room doubles. There
are no kitchen facilities at Cedar
Bend, which has only vending
machines.
Residents will have to go to ~~.~ ~.
North Campus Commons,already i
completed, for their meals. At the ::%k:
commons they will be able to get . f ; ,nrt
a cafeteria meal._hr tmes }vry
Transportation
"Y e separte ° -s;,-#truildi, ,s
tOpi Students will be able to get to
bor thecommons by bus or by walk-iding,; ike th
ers ing. Feldkamp estimated that Iit r , ~..
he should not take moredthanfive ''F!" }t ,.y.
minutes to walk from Cedar Bend
to the commons.
i- Because Cedar Bend will not ,;; }" 4k t..',.,. :
S- in Suh udnl
Al- provide fotecs e tdn
en will be $470-550 per year, de-;,' ' fa r #
back pending on the type of room.<:h"
that Many music students and grad-
uate students doing research on
little North Campus are expected to live
he at Cedar Bend. Feldkamp said the
ides, bus service is good enough so that
g to some Central Campus students
w I might live there. He said at peak
periods there will be buses every
e fu- four minutes, at other times every
right eight minutes. :_:..urs.
cOmle Bursley
gt a, While Cedar Bend con sists of
the Iseparate 120-student building s,
ct. Bursley will be onetraditional
- dormitory building, like SouthA
Quadrangle. Scheduled to open
with the other half of Cedar Be d ~
in the fall of 1967, Burslcy vill b
coeducational and open to under-~
graduates. It will contain 1'200
students.
Bur'sley w~ill have a cafeteria, $' r' a. . a y
and therefor estudents will be :. ''i i 5 ,r a }4 } }.t "}a
charged the samne rates as those }rf.. ' v4^}{ q .. i
in South Quadrangle.
iash- Bursley is located alone; the ".: ' . .:5 fi.. :r , .}\
frtsouith edge of~ Hubbard road, in : }.... sk
nnati the northwest sction of North
thej Campus. Cedar Bend is in the
western sectionvnear th1e music t}}' ; a ro"
two- chool.
have Pictures
tIes,! At the right are pictures show-
ithe in'ug the current state of housing
chers! construction on North Campus.
runs) Th top three pictures are of
Bursley. Although appearing to be
first several buildings, Bursley will, be
s Ia- united into one structure w~ith the
aced$ addition of covered walkw ays.
Taom-' Shown at the bottom of the page
ingle 'is Cedar Bend Unit I. A similar
;oker housing complex. Cedar Be'nd II,
over is under construction.

i

.

]

been contacted by Finley but had
not made a decision. He did deny,
however, that he was seeking an
offer of $100,000 to play oaseball
as was widely reported earlier in
the summer.
No Big Money
"I know I won't get a big ofler
to play baseball. All I want is an
opportunity to try out. I'm in-
telligent enough to know whather
or not I can make it or not, and
if I can't, then I'll get out. I'd
just like a chance to try it."
Russell has been playing base-
ball regularly this summer w:th
the Ann Arbor Travelers, a United
Baseball League Team with several

former Michigan and Eastern Cowboys inquiring about his
Michigan diamondmen on the ros- terest in a football tryout.
ter. Russell is the team's starting though he admitted that he
first baseman and has helped joyed playing end or quarter
them to a 13-3 season's record so in sandlot football he said
far. it was not for him.
Golf Too "I think it would be a
Besides playing baseball Rus- too rough for me out there,
sell has passed the summer on the said with a wide grin, "and bes
golf course, the basketball court like I said before I'm not goir
and the banquet circuit. Earlier go after something if I kni
this week he played in the pro-am can't make it."
celebrity tournament preceding Although his plans for the
the Indianapolis 500 Golf Tourna- ture are "up in the air"
ment. now, Russell believes he willt
In addition to the pro basket- to a final decision in abo
ball and football offers Cazzie re- week as to the name on
ceived a letter from the Dallas uniform he'll be seen in nex

i

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Mets Climb to Eighth Place

By Thie As~ciated Press
ATLANTA - Fantastic dreams
became reality yesterday when the
New York Mets slipped into sole
possession of eighth place as the
Atlanta Braves lost to the St.
Louis Cardinals.
The Mets were idle yesterday,
but their victory of the day be-
fore had left them tied with the
Braves.
Orlando Cepeda triggered a five-
run burst in the second inning
that sent the Braves into ninth
place. The 7-5 Cardinal victory
was their fourth straight and 10th
in the last 11 games.
The Cardinals withstood a three
run Atlanta rally in the eighth
after successive doubles by Cepe-
da and Mike Shannon gave them
a h-2 bulge in the top of the in-
nding.
Two-run triples by Dal Maxvill
and Lou Bruck completed the sec-
ond inning assault against loser
Dori Schwall after Cepeda led off
the inning with his shot into the
left field stands.
Major Leagrue
S Standings
AMELRICA"N LEAGUE

Tigers Lose
CHICAGO-Don Buford's dou-
ble scored Ken Berry with the
,winning run last night as the
Chicago White Sox edged the De-
troit Tigers 2-1.
Berry opened the sixth inning
with a single to center and after
Wayne Causey sacrificed, Buford
delivered the tie-breaking run
with his double.
That was enough to hand Denny
McLain his fourth straight loss
since the All-Star game. McLain
allowed only three other hits. Jack
Lamabe, with late inning help
from Bobby Locker, got credit for
the victory,
The White Sox scored their
first run in the fourth when Cau-
sey singled, moved up on Buford's
bunt and a wild pitch and camne
home on Pete Ward's sacrifice
fly.
Detroit tied it in the fifth on
an error by Buford and singles by
Jim Northrup and Al Kaline.

Reds Slanm Cubs

CINCINNATI-Jim Coker sm
a grand slam homer in the
inning, propelling the Cinci
Reds to a 7-5 victory over
Chicago Cubs last night.
Deron Johnson added a
run homer for the Reds, who
won five of their last six ga
including three straight from
last place Cubs, Chicago pit
now have .allowed 15 home
in the last seven games,
Tommy Harper led off thi
inning with a single. Two out
ter, he stole second and r
home on Tony Perez' single.
my Helms followed with a s
and Johnson walked before C
hit a Curt Simmons pitch
the scoreboard for his t~ird
son homer and second cE
grand slam.,
Another' Homer
The Reds added two runs i
third when Helms doubled
Johnson followed with his
homer.

sea-
areer
n the
and
12th

41
*

Photographs
By
Thomas R. Copi

i

Baltimore
Detroit
Cleveland
California
Minnesota
Chicago
New York
Kansas City
Washington
Boston

W L
67 34
53 45
53 46
52 48
50 50
48 52
46 52
43 55
45 5.9
43 59

Pet.
.663
.541
.535
.520
.500
.480
.469
.439
.422

GB
12 ''
13
14
IC9i
24!x

YESTERDAY'S RES UTS
Chicago 2, Detioit 1
Kansas City at Boston (ppd, rain)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMS
Cleveland at California (n)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Baltimore at Minnesota (n)
New York at Chicago (n)
Boston at Washington (2, t-n)

NATIONAL LEAGUE
. W L Pet.

Pittsburgh
San Francisco
Los Angeles
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Houston
Cincinnati
New York
Atianta
Chicago

59
60
58
52
52
48
47
45
45
31

50
41
40
47
48
51
52
54
55
'69

.596
.591
.592
.525
.520
.485
.4751
.453
.454)
.310

Gil
14
28!

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4

YESTElIc)AS ItESUILTIIS
CincInnati 7, Chicago 5
St. Louis 7, Atlanta 5
Only games scheduled
TIODA'S (,AMF"S
San Francisco at Atlanta (n1)
Houston at Cincinnati (n)
Uhicago at New Eirk (n )

m

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