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July 29, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-07-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN HAIL.

FRIDAY, JULY V29,1966IU

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

a araa.sasa A NU9 le7VV

,-

The Debris of Empire ...

Britain's Problem Children

DRAMA:
Katter Lectures, Directs and
'Acts in 'U' Summer Theater

VIRGIN ISLANDS
ST. CHRIS.-NEVIS-ANGUILLA Since World War I, Britain has dis-
ANTERRAT :membered the Empire, giving
DOMINICA independence to 700 million
ST. LUCIA people. Now the Empire
ST.VINCENT
BERMUDA GRENADA GIBRALTAdown to4-.- 34 de-
BAHAMAS : pendencies and
TURKS and CAICOS ISL ."."
CAYMANSL BARBADOS .>, R"N HONG KONG 14 million
BR HONDURA people,
B~~~e FIONDUR~(R~ X: A r....:;::RABIA)* ?

....... ......

K

-V

.o

TONGA

PITCA IRN _

t

{''

;A--

SEYCHELLES GILBERT AND
BR.INDIAN OCEAN TERRA ELLICE ISL./
ST HELENA and ep. ES BR.SOLOMON ISL
BECHUANALAND PRT )$WAZItAND / MAURITIUS :: I FIJI
J\ * 'ASUTOLAND* * NEW IEBRIDES

O

many
f whom
don't
want to
cut th

Nc G t------- f-------

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\

FALKLAND ISLANDS-

-q I__.
--' .

t

INDEPENDE
SOON.

ENCE
.

pipeline
. , to the
British
Treasury.
w I L

STATUS IN DOUBT -"-l

By BETSY COHN
From podium to proscenium was
the path of Nafe Katter, a grad-
uate of the University and pres-
ently a guest lecturer, actor and
director in the speech department
for the summer.
Prof. Katter spent his first three
years here as a political science
major and an active debater; his
senior year he was swept off his
feet and onto the stage under
the influence "of a fascinating
and inspiring drama course."
While doing graduate work in the
drama department, he acted in
over thirty local productions and
Viet WarI
Industrial
NEW YORK (OP)-Heavy spend-
ing for the war in Viet Nam is
squeezing civilians and industry at
home.
The Defense Department has
poured billions of dollars into the
nation's economy to buy uniforms,
food, bombs and bullets.
To meet the needs of the fight-
ing men in Viet Nam, some manu-
facturers have had to cut back
on production for civilians.
Shortages of men's clothing have
been reported by some depart-
ment stores.
Shortages
Factories note shortages of cop-
per, electronic and chemical pro-
ducts, machine tools, small motors,
forgings and castings, computers
and aircraft engines.
Defense industries had unfilled
orders totalling $24.6 billion in
November. By May they had

directed several operas during his "My Fair Lady" and "Thurber
teaching-fellow stage. Carnival."
From the University, Mr. Katter Aside from being teacher and
decided to go East and see what director this summer, Mr. Katter
could be dug up at the University has also spent a considerable
of Connecticut; there he has re- amount of time being Enrice IV,
mained for eight years as a teach- in the recent U Players production
er, director and actor at Connec- of Pirandello's "Enrico IV," a grim
ticut's Nutmeg Theatre (a theatre psychological fellow, according to
akin to the APA in that both are Katter.
subsidized by their respective uni- This week, Katter is director of
versities). Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit," "a
Between acting, directing and sparkling farcical comedy on a
teaching, Katter stays in a multi- sophisticated level which should
faceted groove: the plays he di- be fun after all this seriousness,"
rects range from heavy drama to says Katter.
light musicals and giddy comedies. "Blithe Spirit" is one of Cow-
In 1964, he returned to Michi- ard's most heroic and successful
gan's Summer Playbill to direct bouts with comedy. It is the grave
and ghostly tale about the capers
of vapors in a coquettish chaotic
comedy about husband, wife, other
r d e swife and consequential rivalry.
"The bright sophisticated dialogue
and the creation of Madam Arcati
are both classic and accomplished
S offerings of 'Blithe Spirit,' which
has also been made into a movie,
are needed in industry to meet the 'High Spirits'," said Katter.
demands of increased military an sart kfssof Katteatre lin
production. to accept "any form of drama,
Then the mills at home are from the most bizarre avant garde
pressed to clothe and feed them. to the classical drama, as long as
The problem is particularly it is theatrical and makes a strong
acute in clothing and textiles, appeal to the emotions." In co-rn
Cut into Supplies paring theater to the cinema Kat-
"It will cut into civilian sup- ter commented that movies offer
plies, but not any more than it more than theatre in spectacle
has to date," an agency spokes- and affectation by camera or
man said. other devices; "but," he added,
The Defense Department is hav- "the stage requiresamore work of
ing trouble getting bids on many the audience just because every-
military orders as a result. Of 330 thing is not clearly depicted and
firms asked to bid on making audience imagination is required:
waterproof clothing bags, four this is art."
submitted bids. Of theb8 asked The product of a political science
for cotton denim cloth, one bid. major who took twenty one years
Of 261 asked to make flier's nylon (and 68 wrong credits) to find out
twill jackets, three submitted pro- he could sing, act,ndance and
posals. direct can be seen in the figure
"Nobody wants government busi- of Nafe Katter and in the produc-
ness," said Isidore M. Cohen, presi- tion of "Blithe Spirit" (beginning
dent of Joseph H. Cohen & Sons, Wednesday); both promise to be
Inc., which makes men's suits and accomplished representatives of
sports coats. the theatre.
"It's difficult to make any mon-
ey, and meanwhile you're turning Phone 482-2056 I

TERRITORY POPULATION BRITISH DEPENDENCIES

ADEN (PROT. S. ARABIA)........1,100,000
ANTIGUA ......................................60,000
BAHAMAS..................................134,000
BARBADOS ................................242,000
BASUTOLAND..........733,000
BECHUANALAND PROT......548,000
BERMUDA ...................................4$,000
BR. GUIANA ..............................630,000

BR. HONDURAS.......103,000
BR. INDIAN OCEAN TERR.1............1,400
BR. SOLOMON ISL PROT. ........137,000
BR. VIRGIN ISLANDS .............8,500
BRUNEI........ . .. 85,000
CAYMAN ISLANDS ...... .8,853
DOMINICA..........64,000
FALKLAND ISLANDS .................2,117

FIJI ............................................449,000
GIBRALTAR ..................................24,386
GILBERT AND ELLICE ISL..........50,000
GRENADA ....................................93,000
HONG KONG .................3,692,000
MAURITIUS................................741,000
MONTSERAT ..............................13,500
NEW HEBRIDES2 ........................66,000

PITCAIRN.....-..- ...........86
RHODESIA ...............................4,140,000
ST. CHRIS.-NEVIS-ANGUILLA ......59,000
ST. HELENA and dep.3..................5,170
ST. LUCIA ....................................94,000
ST. VINCENT ................................85,000
SEYCHELLES ........ 46,000
SWAZILAND ..............................285,000
TONGA4 ......................................71,000
TURKS and CAICOS ISL ................6,272

I . This territory consists of the Chagos Archipelago (formerly part of Mauritius andAldabr2, Farquh'ar and Desroches Islands (formerly part of Seychelles). 2. This is an Anglo-French Condominium. Authority is exercized
jointly by British and French Resident Commissioners under the 1914 Protocol. 3. The dependencies are Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha. 4. Britain is responsible for external affairs, defense, banking, currency and
exchange under a Treaty of Friendship. AP Newsfeatures
Britai~n Still oldsRemains of an Empire

LONDON (MP)-The British are
still shouldering the white man's
burden in scattered remnants of
their empire, and several million
of their colonial wards don't want
them to lay it down.
Freedom would have little
meaning except bankruptcy for
some islanders still under the
Union Jack in the Caribbean and
the South Seas. For the residents

of Hong Kong or Gibraltar, in-
dependence probably would lead
only to domination by neighboring
Spain or Communist China.
Since the war Britain has given
independence to about 700 million
people. Now only about 10 million
are left in 34 British dependencies.
In population, they range in size
from the 3.6 million inhabitants

of Hong Kong to the 86 on lonely
Pitcairn Island, where the mu-
tineers of the H.M.S. Bounty
settled in 1790.
Although the empire once
brought riches to Britain and
meant only a moral burden to
the white man, it now is truly a
financial burden only.
"Our remaining colonial terri-
tories, believe me, are not a ma-

Cuban Refugees Vow Return-
But Many Remain in U.S.A.

terial asset. In terms of finance,
they are a heavy liability," Lord
Caradon, Britain's chief UN dele-
gate, told the General Assembly
recently.
In the past quarter-century,
Britain has budgeted about $1
billion in development and welfare
schemes in its colonies. In 1964,
the last year for which figures
are available, about $110 million
was spent-and the figure goes up
as costs rise.
In these figures lie some of the
reasons why remaining territories
do not want to throw out the
British. The British help balance
the budget and pay for long-
range development.
In some colonies, the British
also serve as political arbitrators.
In Fiji, for example, the popula-
tion is divided between Indians
and Fijians. Britain is devising a
constitution and system of local
self-government to help offset mu-

ish officials see as the accidents The final tally on defense ex-
x-away customers. Maybe they won't
of geography and history which penditures for the year ended June come back."
probably will remain with the 30 is expected to be over $55
Britisch as long as they are a billion, $800 million more than
nation. Officials admit they may predicted as recently as January.
be subject to criticism from anti- This year it may top $60 billion.
colonialists in the United Nations inflation
and elsewhere, but Caradon re- The Viet Nam spending on top DIAL 2-6264
marked: of the domestic boom has touched 4 SHOWS ONLY DAILY
"It is no use hoping that if we off inflationary pressures.
blow hard enough on the trumpets The most noticeable pinch comesNj
of immediate independence the from the military's expanding
practical obstacles will come tumb- manpower needs, subtracting men
ling down." from the work force when they 1-M. E rnE
_____ STEVE MNOUFN

EntOeOnWCARPENTERROA
NOW SHOWING

plete independence-in as many jumped to $27.3 billion.
colonies as want it. The shortages extend to trans-
These are the problems posed by portation of many kinds, and to
what the London Times calls the labor and credit, rippling through,
"debris of empire," and what Brit- the economy.

40
Ir

I

ELIZABETH, N.J. MP-On the
back window of Jose Negrin's car,
a chipped decal shows a grinning
worm clutching a carbine in one
"hand" and a Cuban flag in the
other.
The worm stands for Cuban
Prime Minister Fidel Castro's "gu-
sano"-the label for his enemies
who want to recapture Cuba. Ex-
iled Cubans have adopted the
worm as a symbol of their oppo-
sition to Castro.
But Negrin is not going back
and neither are a lot of others
who rally around the worm.
Marking Time

in Central America. Each indi-
cation of dissension in Cuba
touches off phone calls between
exile groups.
But all the while the assimila-
tion continues.
Getting Out
But if the refugees worry about
their return, they face other prob-
lems of perhaps greater urgency.
One such problem is getting fam-
ily members out of Cuba.
Despite Castro's relaxation of
emigration rules, many persons re-
main trapped on the island. Re-
cently, a grizzled man with a wor-
ied mouth and hopeful eyes told

Union County constituents. "They
are very industrious ... ready to
work and to offer to work."
For the most part, authorities
and observers tend to agree with

1 1611
Arda (! m;lkjldLvR-

COOLED BY
REFRIGERATION
Dial 8-6416

KARL MALDEN -BRIAN KEITH
ARTHUR KENN1EDY
BSUZAN~NE PLESHElTE.
~ ,Q

Gov. Richard J. Hughes when he tual suspicions between the two
told a U.S. Senate committee last racial groups.
April that his state was a better The British policy is to pro-
one because of the Cubans. mote self-government-if not com-

U

'" "" '"

When he came here five years Cuba.
ago, Negrin thought he was mark- " gs y
ing time until the return to Cuba. "Myeaughe,"shesoLi1 an
But he has established himself so hes all I hve, sa L O B.
firmy tht hi exle hs beomeArencilla. "It's been since October
firmly that his exile has become that they said she could leave, but
permanent. they won't let her .. . I don't
About 20,000 of the 100,000 Cu- know why."
bans that have come to the Unit-I
ed States since 1961 have settled Waiting
in Eizaeth.Man hav beome Luis Nuibo Saez, who spent 16i
in Elizabeth. Many have become months in jail after he turned
integral parts of the communitygastasr"ecseid e-
buying businesses and taking part against Castro "because Fidel be-
ingpublic affairs, n g came a traitor," is waiting for his
in .wife and three young children.
And more and more of these Then there's another problem.
Cuban refugees are coming to re- When a refugee leaves Cuba, he is
gard their worm as an impossible virtually penniless.
dream. , There is help from volunteer re-
Won't Go Back lief agencies, federal and local
"They won't go back, even if governments and othcr Cubans.
Castro is overthrown," says Sam- But essentially, the refugee has to
uel Rodriguez, a Spanish expatri- start again from scratch.
ate and a leader of Elizabeth's Doing Well
Spanish-speaking community since "They're dping extremely well,"
1947. says Rep. Florence P. Dwyer (R-
"They're establishing credit, NJ), called "the little congress-
buying houses, cars ... and they woman" by her Spanish-speaking
have too much regard for their
families than to Just take their Lose Something?
children and go.
"I remember during Batista. It Find it with a
was the same way. One man told
me every day that the minute Daily Classified

m m m---m--m - -- --m -- - ----------mm m m - ------ ......
1 1
1 !
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR E
I I
I I
* U
WILLIAM WELLMAN
! 1
1 /
Ie
i ~(1939)
! 9
THE film on the French Foreign Legion.
N Excitement and entertainment without any sacrifices!
1 /
Starring
GARY COOPER, RAY MILLAND,
ROBERT PRESTON, BRIAN DONLEVY,
SUSAN HAYWARD
M I
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TiC I
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IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
i AOMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
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ENDS SATURDAY -ONE SHOW TONIGHT AT 7:15
"SPICY ... A LOVE CHARADE' Harold Tribune
VA D ITS
CIRCLE "OF LOVE
with JANE FONDA as the 'Wife'. EASTMANCOLOR
THIS MOTION PICTURE IS FOR ADULTS ONLY
AND
Tibl9MODD)ESSES

ALSO SHOWN AT 10:30 ONLY
v WILD . COUNTRY!
CINEScOPE' cOLOR by ELUXE -.-
PLUS-"The Longest Bridge"
Travel Adventure-Living Color
2 COLOR CARTOONS

A SVAflPSflGtIm*AAMaAUT Mf s

',
3

Batista was overthrown he would
return. He even came to me and
said, "Adios, I'm leaving."
"He's still here,"
Gonzales
There are many, of course, who
firmly assert their intention to re-
turn. Enrique Gonzales, a Bay of
Pigs veteran, is typical.
"You bet I'm going back. Be-
fore Castro falls. I'm going to
fight again," he said.
Leaders hold continuous meet-
ings to plot and rally for the
hoped for coup. Money and time
are spent on training guerrillas

__^ ry

I

#1

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech) present
SUMMER PLAYBILL '66

Aug. 3 to Aug. 6
NOEL

Aug. 10 to Aug. 13
MOZART'S
CiT

Eu.uzi ETn Tmwin.so
IN ERNEST LEHMAN'S PRODUCTION OFEDWARDALBEE'S
u m O ..

,'
I

L-- o r ~ iktfulL3IP.

I

11

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i1

I

Ill

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