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July 26, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-26

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'TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACF, THRIPIt

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1 9 6 6 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAI~U 'rnnu'u

ISSS 53 = == SW,13M

IF

Senate Schedules Hearing

Onl

Airline

WASHINGTON (P)-The Senate
Labor Committee put off action
% yesterday on a bill to end the
18-day airline strike.
The committee scheduled a pub-
lic hearing for today on the meas-
ure.
Chairman Lister Hill (D-Ala)
said the committee would hear
testimony from representatives of
the administration, the five
grounded airlines, and the strik-
ing International Association of
Machinists.
There was no immediate ex-
planation of the decision to delay
a showdown on the proposal by
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore) that
Congress pave the way for a six-
month back to work order.
Today's hearing is to deal with
it as well with other proposals to
end the strike. They include a
compulsory arbitration plan and
a proposal for government seizure
of the airlines.
While Congress has taken over
in an effort to halt the costly, 18-
day-old strike against five major
airlines, prospects for major legis-
lative action today were quickly
dashed.
The focus shifted to Capitol Hill
while the Labor Department was
reporting a complete negotiation
stalemate and theWhite House
was remaining silent.
Morse Bill
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore) in-
troduced a bill to send the strikers
back to work while a special medi-
ation panel works out a solution
to the dispute between the airlines
and the Machinists' Union.
The Senate Labor Committee
took up the measure three hours
later. Sen. Jennings Randolph (D-
WVa) came out of the closed
session and told newsmen he be-
lieved the committee would act
swiftly so that a Senate vote to-
day would be possible.
The hearing will begin at 1:30
(DT) and a committee spokes-
man said the hope is that it will
be completed today.
Senate sources said indications
are that a committee majority will
back Morse's bill to pave the way!
for a 180-day-back-to-work order
while negotiations continue. Un-
der his formula, if no settlement
came within 150 days, Congress
would get a report from a media-
tion panel, and could act again to
forestall a new walkout.
These sources said the concerns
that led the committee to call a
public hearing center on a pro-
posed congressional declaration
"that emergency measures are,
essential."
They said senators at the 90-
minute private session felt such
a declaration requires a support-

ing record, and that only a public
hearing could produce it.
Aides said today's public session
will deal only with the emergency
question, not with the merits of
Morse's bill or a series of others
put before the Senate.
Once the question of an emer-
gency declaration is settled, they
said, the committee probably will
decide in executive session upon
a course to end the strike.
Meanwhile a spokesman for the
airlines said that if the strike
should be terminated suddenly
some services could be resumed al-

tri e
most at once. But it probably
would be two to three days before
all five carriers could return to
full operation.
"I think I can speak for the
President of the United States
that if there was a possibility, the
slightest possibility of reaching
agreement on the strike by calling
the parties to the White House, he
would do so."
Sen. Republican Leader Everett
M. Dirksen of Illinois proposed a
compulsory arbitration law for a
binding settlement for up to three
years.

T 1oday
Union President P. L. Siemiller
said talk of compulsory arbitration
is spurring a flood of telegrams
from strikers proposing "a mas-
sive march on Washington" in
protest. But he said he has no
plans for such a mass march, at
least for now.
"We will comply with any legal
order of the United States govern-
ment," Siemiller said.
Compulsory arbitration has been
used only once before in U.S.
peacetime history, in 1963, to avert
a nationwide railroad strike.

PARIS MEETING:
NATO Ministers Approve
Five-Year Defense, Plan

PARIS (lP)-North Atlantic Treaty
Organization defense ministers ap-
proved yesterday a five-year de-
fense plan giving special attention
to the flank areas of Europe-
especially the southeastern region
-and ordered a study on new fi-
nancing for a mobile force which
could help defend the flank areas.
A communique summing up
their one-day meeting did not go
into detail but informed sources
said the defense ministers, by and
large, expressed the opinion that
the NATO shield was only barely
adequate now and should not be
allowed to weaken.
Appeal
The appeal for an ever stronger
NATO to discourage the Soviet
bloc from being "tempted to test
our will and capability to resist"
was voiced early in the meeting
by U.S. Secretary of Defense Rob-
ert S. McNamara. He said the
United States wants no reduction
of NATO capability, that is the
ability to apply military pressure
on a given situation regardless of
the headcount of the troops.
Speaking of possible reductions,
McNamara did not single out any
nation. British Defense Minister
Denis Healey told the meeting that
parts of the British Army of the
Rhine will have to be withdrawn
unless other members help pay
its maintenance costs, which are
imposing a heavy drain on the
critical British balance of pay-
ments.
The communique noted that the
contributions of French forces and
the conditions of their cooperation
with NATO are under separate
consideration.
As for the flank regions, Mc-

Namara urged adoption of a new
mobile force to be made up of new
units instead of units already
committed to the center of the
front. That way the mobile force
could rush to defend a flank area
without weakening the center.
Noting "the special position of
the southeastern region," the min-
isters "underlined the importance
of the defense of the flank regions
of the North Atlantic area," the
communique said. "They also gave
instructions for completion of de-
fense planning studies related to
the southeastern region."
This southeastern region covers
Greece and Turkey.
The ministers devoted special
attention to the part which the
Allied Command European Mobile
Force, can play in contributing
deterrents and demonstrating that

spirit of solidarity of units and
purpose upon which the North
Atlantic alliance is based. They
gave instructions for development
of new financial arrangements for
this force.
The ministers also emphasized
the need for "an equitable sharing
of burdens," a point brought up
both by McNamara and Healey.
McNamara had implied the United
States was carrying more than its
share of the burden when measur-
ed by any index such as costs in
percentages of gross national pro-
duct, or troops per 100,000 popula-
tion. Healey said Britain is now
and will be until 1970 spending
a higher percentage of gross na-
tional product on defense than
most NATO partners.
The five-year plan covers the
years 1966 through 1970.

Name New
Cabinet in
Indonesia
'Big Three' Remain
Sukarno Left Out;
Suharto Still Top Man
JAKARTA, Indonesia (A:) - A
new Cabinet was named yesterday
with the military-civilian Big
Three that has guided Indonesia's
destiny since March taking on
broader powers. President Sukarno
was left out in the cold.
Lt. Gen. Suharto, the military
strong man, remains top man in
a new and streamlined 29-mem-
ber Cabinet. At his side are For-
eign Minister Adam Malik and
Economic Minister Sultan Ham-
engku Buwono, their authority
over political and economic affairs
greatly"increased.
Informants said the new Cabi-
net was shaped almost single
handedly by Suharto although Su-
karno was empowered by the re-
cent Congress, Indonesia's highest
legal authority, to help name it.
Compromise
Apparently Sukarno was able to
win compromises on only a few
minor positions in this Cabinet,
cut down from the 100-member
one he used to control. Even those
who might be pro-Sukarno are
cut off from direct contact with
the president.
In an obvious attempt to fur-
ther isolate Sukarno, Suharto an-
nounced the new Cabinet will
deal directly only with a five-man
Presidium headed by himself,
Malik and Buwono. Then if Su-
harto agrees, Cabinet matters may
be passed on to Sukarno.
Despite -his setbacks, Sukarno in
a radio address announcing the
new Cabinet said he remained
first in leadership, with. the Pre-
sidium providing assistance. He
said the new Cabinet will be sworn
in at his palace Thursday.
Stabalize Economy
He said the new Cabinet's pro-
gram should, be to stabilize the
economy and "to continue the
struggle of anti-imperialism."
Since Buwono and his aides in
seeking international aid must ap-
ply to nations Sukarno regards as
imperialist, this part of the pro-
gram will hardly be taken serious-
ly.
Suharto, 46, made himself chair-
man of the new Cabinet, defense
minister and army chief.
As a Presidium member in
charge of political affairs, Malik
in addition to the Foreign Minis-
try will have control over the
interior justice and information
ministers.
In his role as economic czar,
Buwono will have supervision over
the commerce, finance, communi-
cations, martime affairs, agricul-
ture and plantations ministers.

Leftists Challenge Gandhi,
Oppose Economic Policies

World News Roundup

NEW DELHI, India (T)-Left-
ists introduced a no-confidence
motion against Prime Minister
Indira Gandhi's seven-month-old
government in an uproarious ses-
sion of Parliament yesterday.
Mrs. Gandhi is expected easily
to survive the motion because her
congress party has an overwhelm-
ing majority in Parliament.
But Mrs. Gandhi undeniably
had a rough day.
The clear-cut challenge climax-
ed a politically embarrassing day
for Mrs. Gandhi during which she
sought to reassure the United
States it was not the target of
strong language in a communique
she signed in Moscow with Soviet
Premier Alexei N. Kosygin.
First Time
The no-confidence motion, the
first against Mrs. Gandhi since
she became prime minister in Jan-
uary, signaled the beginning of an
all-out leftist attack on her deci-
sion to devalue the rupee, her
government's inability to halt ris-
ing prices, and on other economic
policies.
Parliament quickly dissolved in-
to chaos as leftists charged her
government could not maintain
order in the northern state of Ut-
tar Pradesh, where government
workers have been on strike for
more than one week.
Although the strike was called
off later in the day, police clash-
ed with mobs in the state capital,
Lucknow, inflaming Mrs. Gandhi's
parliamentary critics.
Some leftists walked out, and
others were carried out by Parlia-
ment guards trying to restore or-
der. Enough leftists stayed behind,
however, to' support the motion
of no confidence made by Hiren
Mukerjee, a Communist leader.
NoResponse
Mrs. Gandhi did not immedi-
Phone 482-2056
Os
Open 7:00--Now Showing

CLEVELAND (P)-A grand jury
was called yesterday to examine
reasons and remedies for racial
violence that flared across Cleve-
land's Negro slums for five nights
last week before police and Na-
tional Guardsmen enforced un-
easy peace.
The special session of the Cuya-
hoga County Grand Jury was set
for 9:15 a.m. EDT today and the
prosecutor began immediately to
summon witnesses.
The Cleveland weekend was
quiet. But Maj. Gen. Erwin Hos-
tetler, Ohio National Guard com-
mander, said after an hour-long
morning conference with Mayor
Ralph S. Locher:
"There will be no reduction of
the guard today. We will have to
assess the situation as time goes

along, on a day-to-day basis. It's
on the downhill grade."
Since the first guardsmen ar-
rived last week, 1,750 troops have
been committed to patrol the
Hough area and adjacent neigh-
borhoods. The soldiers are work-
ing with a contingent of city po-
lice numbering up to 400, or near-
ly one-fifth of the department.
The two-square-mile Hough
area contains about one-fourth of
the city's 270,000 Negroes and has
Cleveland's highest rates of pover-
ty, illiteracy, crime and unemploy-
ment.
Four Negroes - a woman and
three men-died of gunfire wounds
in last week's violence. There were
46 injuries, nine from bullet
wounds. Arrests mounted to 235.
Property damage by looters and

Call Grand Jury to Investigate
Remedies for Racial Violence

ately respond to the attacks on
her economic policies but gave a
previously scheduled talk on for-
eign affairs.
She explained that a controver-
sial sentence in a joint communi-
que she had signed with Kosygin
July 16 was not directed against
any country.
Mrs. Gandhi was replying to
questions by members after she
had read a statement on her re-
cent trip.
The United States has express-
ed "displeasure" through diplo-
matic channels with a sentence in
the communique which referred
to "mounting war dangers which
have occurred lately as a result
of aggressive actions of imperial-
ist and other reactionary forces."
She said: "This expression is
often used in international parl-
ance and in the United Nations
and is a general statement about
certain forces and does not refer
to any particular country. They
(certain forces) exist in China,
and they exist in many colonial
countries."
She also referred to another
issue over which the United States
had expressed its "irritation"-
emphasis on the stoppage of
bombing of North Viet Nam with-
out any corresponding move by
Hanoi to end aggression against
South Viet Nam.

arsonists has been estimated at
upward of $500,000, including
cleanup costs.
Murder Charges
Second-degree murder charges
were filed against two white men
yesterday in the last of the four
shooting deaths;. that of Benoris
Toney, 29, whose face was blast-
ed by shotgun pellets fired from a
car before dawn Saturday. Toney,
a father of five, died over the
weekend.
Patsy Sabetta, 21, and Warren
La Riche, 28, waived examination
on the charges at a preliminary
hearing and were held for the
grand jury on' $5000 bond each.
Both gave East 120th Street ad-
dresses near the Euclid Avenue
parking lot where Toney was shot.
Their attorney, Adrian Fink, said
he would argue that they fired
in self-defense.
No arrests have been, made in
the other fatal shootings. The
first two victims were hit during
crossfire between police and snip-
ers. The third victim was cut down
by shots from a car while on the
way to get a bus. Before he died,
he told police that white men fired
the shots, f
Shootings
The shootings will get attention
of the special grand jury called
by-Judge Thomas J. Parrino, pre-
siding judge of Common Pleas
Court. Current forerman of the
grand jury is Louis B. Seltzer, who
retired early this year from a long
career as editor of the Cleveland
Press.
"The seeds of these riotous acts
are found in grave social injus-
tices," Judge Parrino said. "Pov-
erty produces enormous frustra-
tion. Violence, however, does not
remedy any problem. It cannot
be condoned.
"The grand jury will seek to find
the immediate cause of this viol-
ence. This action is designed to
accomplish three things:
"-Assist in restoring order.
"-Suggest meaningful remedies
to existing community problems.
"--Take appropriate action
where evidence of unlawful acts
is discovered."
e- tAonL 2ModernColin
DIAL 5-6290

By The Associated Press
LONDON-Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson last night squeezed
through the first of two battles
against leftistsand rightists chal-
lenging his leadership and skep-
tical of his austerity policies.
A majority of Labor party law-
makers at a special caucus reluc-
tantly accepted Wilson's explana-
tion of the reasons for slashing
Britain's spending by nearly $2
billion.
But about 40 left-wingers issued
a statement expressing "grim fore-
bodings" that Wilson's crash pro-
gram would bring unemployment
and a wage freeze "completely

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

contrary to our Socialist beliefs"
on which the 1964 and 1966 na-
tional elections had been won.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
tumbled to a new low for the
year yesterday in the sharpest
drop since President Kennedy's
assassination.
Brokers blamed tight money as,
one cause for the steep decline.
The Dow Jones average of 30
industrial stocks skidded 16.32 to
852.83. The year's previous low
was 864.14 on May 17.
The market ignored a flood of
excellent profit reports released by
big corporations over the weekend
and fell in the last 45 minutes of
trading.
GENEVA-The United States
and Russia agreed yesterday each
nation that launches a satellite or
a space ship should be liable for
any damage if it crashes into an-
other country's territory.
The accord was reached in the
United Nations' legal space con-
ference.
Welcome
Students!
. DISTINCTIVE
COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING
For MEN-
And Women-
S* 7 Hairstylists
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

"ENDS W ED N ESDAY"
Fro The
Man Who Made
"Charade"

Dial 8-6416

1

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, JULY 26
Day Calendar
Office of Religious Affairs Book Dis-
cussion-Martin Bell, associate Epis-
copal chaplain, "A Discussion of 'Situa-
tion Ethics: The New Morality' by Jo-
seph Fletcher : Michigan Union, 12 m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Power Among Men": Multi-
purpose Room, Undergraduate Library,
1:30 p.m.
school of Music Concert- The
Baroque Trio:R ckham Lecture Hall,
8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Attention Degree Candidates for
Spring, Summer and Spring-Summer,
1966: This office will provide you with
a diploma and transcript of your aca-
demic record showing your latest de-
gree about Sept. 15, 196.
Those who expeoct to be graduated
pending completion of courses in any
one of the foregoing periods, should
turn in a diploma application to this
oifice now, if one has not been pre-
viously submitted.
SUMMER COMMENCEMENT
EXERCI SES
August 7, 1966
To be held at 2 p m, in Hill Aud.
Exercises will conclude about 4 p.m.
All graduates of the 1966 spring-sum-
mer term may attend.
Reception for graduates, their rela-
tives and friends in Michigan League
Ballroom at 4 p.m. Please enter League
at west entrance.
Tickets: Four to each prospective
graduate, to be distributed from Mon.,
July 25, to Fri., Aug. 5, at Diploma
Department, 555 Administration Bidg.,
except on Sat., July 23, when office
will be closed,
Academic Costume: May be rented
at Moe Sport Shop, 711 N. University

Natural Science Aud. Marshals will di-
rect graduates to proper stations.
Programs: To be distributed at Hill
Aud.
Candidates who qualify for a doctoral
degree from the Graduate School and
WHO ATTEND THE COMMENCEMENT
EXERCISES will be presented a hood
by the University at the ceremony.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Mich.-
Staff Auditor in Internal Auditing Dept.
Grad, major in Acctg., some exper. de-
sirable, some travel required, eventual-
ly to foreign subsidiaries, increasing
responsibilities.
DePaul University, Chicago, Il.-Ad-
missions Counselor (two positions),
both male and female needed. Inter-
view, counsel and recruit students for
university. Experienced person or new
grad, BA/MA. Need accountant also,
recent grad, government acctg. func-
tions for grants and loans,
Management Consultants, N.Y.C. Area
-Assistant Controller, manages control
analysis section. Grad, in Bus. Ad.
MBA desirable. Must have exper. with
large corporation in operations analy-
sis, E.D.P. familiarity.
Macomb Action Program for Econom-
Ic Opportunity, Mt. Clemens, Mich. -
Three openings. 1. Director Community

Action Centers, 5 yrs. exper. in com-
munity organization related to poverty,
three supervisory. 2. Assistant Director.
Degree and at least three years in
public administration. 3. Program Co-
ordinator. Grad with specialization in
some field related to social welfare,
some experience preferred.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered stundent or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB3.
** *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture discussion (informal), Tues., July
26, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3RD Union.
Voice-SDS, General membership meet-
ing, finalizing plans for International
Days of Protest against the war in
Viet Nam, Tues., July 26, 8 p.m., Rm.
3G Michigan Union.

Ends Wednesday
Thursda
Nwt
TO RoA
nan
"THES LOVESGODETSSOE
GUARANTED
TO MAKE
YOU LAUGH!"
Thursday
"CIRCLE OF LOVE"
with
JANE FON DA
and
"THE LOVE GODDESSES"

EORYI--SOPRIA.
PECK A'IfEE
STANLEY DONEN
TSCHN10OLOR'
PANAVISION* t
As UNIVER:SALR*LEA"E

rCoLORIPANAYIlSIONUNITED ARTISTS
- FRIDAY -
"WHO'S AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF?"

I

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E

I

:

Lose Something?
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ALSO -
*,SWMDOG,THE MONKEY 7 ,
'Shown
at
11:00
only
PLUS: "Race with the Wind"
Color - Sports in Action
2 Color Cartoons

FOR A CAREFREE SUMMER EVENING'S FUN
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY THEATRE
PRESENTS A DELIGHTFUL REVIEW CALLED
athurber-carnival
THURSDAY - SUNDAY, JULY 28 - 31 8:00 P.M.
QUIRK AMPHITHEATRE ALL SEATS $1.50
FOR RESERVATIONS TELEPHONE 482-3453

i

August
GRADUATION

11

r

ii/elprejenj .. .
DR. EUGENE FEINGOLD
Associate Professor in School of Public Health
in a REVIEW and DISCUSSION of
"JOHN BIRCH SOCIETY, 1966"

ANNOUNCEMENTS
are now on sale at
2503 SAB

Thursday, July 28
8 P.M.

Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill

i

U

Ii

It"-

..

TUESDAY LUNCHEON DISCUSSION
Michigan Union (Anderson D)

4 I

iA
THE MICHIGAN U NION
~ !m.. -. lAK A&I

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