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May 06, 1966 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-06

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 6, 1966

WAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MAY 6,1966

.r vv

NORTHERN INVITATIONAL:
Golfers Return to Action

'M' Thinclads Clash with Wildcats, Illini

The Wolverine golfers, after a
long layoff from competition, re-
turn to action today in the North-
ern Intercollegiate Invitational
Golf Tournament at Bloomington,
Ind.,
The golfers have not faced any
intercollegiate competition since
the Miami Invitational in late
March. In that tourney, the Wol-
verines were in fourth place go-
ing into the final 18 holes, but
the whole team shot bogeys or
worse on the first hole, and -the
team ended up in sixth place in
the 26-team field.
Since that tourney the link-
sters have been sharpening their
games at the Michigan course
and left early yesterday to get in
a practice round at the Indiana
course.
The tourney consists of 72 holes
of medal play over the Indiana
course. 36 holes each will be play-

ed today and tomorrow and the
five lowest rounds of each 18 holes.
will be scored for each team.
Competing in the tourney with
Michigan will be seven more Big
Ten teams--all except Wisconsin
and Northwestern. Notre Dame,
Western Illinois, Ohio, Toledo, and
Marshall are also entered in the
meet.
The favorite's role in the tour-
nament will be played by Purdue.
The Boilermakers won the con-
ference championship tournament
last year by 14 strokes and are
consistently strong in golf.
Ohio State, runner-up to Florida
in the Miami Invitational earlier
in the year, and Indiana should
also be among the top finishers.
Michigan also must be consider-
ed a strong contender. In last
year's conference meet the golfers
finished second behind Purdue.
Wolverine Captain Bill Newton

was the medalist in the Big Ten'
meet last year with a 72-hole total
of 287 and rates as one of the
favorites in the Northern Invi-
tational.
Other lettermen competing for
Michigan in the meet are Bill
Carclay and Jim Evashevski, both
sons of former outstanding Mich-
igan athletes.
The remaining members of the
team are senior Bob Bond and
sophomores John Richart, John
Schroeder, and Chip Groves.
The sophomores have shown
strong promise in earlier compe-
tition. Schroeder paced the squad
in the Miami tourney and Richart
was formerly Western Junior

By BUD WILKINSON
Summer Sports Editor
The Michigan track team travels
to Champaign tomorrow to meet
Big Ten opposition for the first
time in this year's outdoor season
when it faces Northwestern and
Illinois in a triangular meet.
The Wolverines will be favored
in the meet on the basis of their
fourth place finish in the confer-
ence indoor championships. Illinois
and Northwestern are expected to
wage a close battle for second.
Northwestern will present the
strongest challenge to Michigan
in the pole vault and the distance
events, whereas Illinois' strength
is primarily in the discus throw,
sprints, and hurdles.
Pole Vault Champ
In the pole vault the Wildcats
will have Jim Albrecht. Albrecht
captured the conference indoor
championship earlier this year
with a vault of 15'.

Albrecht will be pressed to top
Wolverine Captain George Can-
amare, however. Canamare won
the Big Ten outdoor champion-
ship last year with a record-
breaking 15'9/2" leap and went
over the bar at 15'5/2" just two
weeks ago at the Ohio State
Relays.
Competing in the mile run for
Northwestern will be Craig Boyd-
ston, holder of the conference rec-
ord in the event in 4:09.9.
Top Two-Miler
Another top Wildcat distance
man is Lee Assenheimer, who will
run in the two-mile. Assenheimer,
is the Big Ten cross country
champion and has the fastest out-
door time in the two-mile so far
this season.
Challenging these two for Mich-
igan will be miler Brian Kelley
and two-miler Ted Benedict.
Kelley placed fourth in the mile
in the outdoor championships last

year, and Benedict has run the dash, Illinois will have one of the
two-mile in 9:10. best one-two combinations in the
Another event in which North- conference this year. These two
western is likely to pick up points should push Wolverine Dorie Reid,

is the 660-yard run. Wildcat Steve
Cullinan has the fastest outdoor
clocking in the conference this
year and his teammate Jim Harris
was the Big Ten champion in the
event last year.
Varsity Record-Holder
Michigan will counter in the
660 with Fred Grove. Grove fin-
ished second in the conference
meet behind Harris last year and
holds the Michigan varsity record
of 1:18.8.
In the discus Illinois will pre-
sent tough competition for the
Wolverines with Fritz Foretzke
and Terry Miller, both of whom
are capable of topping the 160
mark. Michigan's longest toss of
the year was one of 166'4%" by
Bob Donnelly in the Ohio Relays.
With Cyril Pinder and Doug
Harford running in the 100-yard,

Champion.

-B.W.

last year's outdoor champion in
the 100.
Illini Strong
Another strong event for Illinois
should be the 440-yard intermed-
iate hurdles. John Wright is one
of the best in the conference in
this event and has good backing
in Jim Enck and Will Watson.
Michigan's Nelson Graham will
contend with Wright for the hur-
dles title. Graham has one of the
fastest times in the conference in
the 330-yard intermediates and
placed fifth in the Ohio State Re-
lays in the 440-yard event.
The events in which Michigan
should be particularly strong are
the shot put, high jump, 440- and
880-yard runs and the mile relay.
Jack Harvey has the confer-
ence's best mark in the shot put
at 58'10" and is backed solidly by
Steve Leuchtman.
'M' Trio in 440
In the 440-yard run Michigan
has three strong contenders in
Bob Gerometta and sophomores
Elmo Morales and Alex McDon-
ald. Morales may also back up
Cecil Norde in the 880.
In the high jump Michigan will
throw Bob Densham and soph
Rick Hunt against the Wildcats
and Illini. Densham has jumped
6'10" indoors and Hunt has top-
ped 6'6".
Michigan's mile relay team,
consisting of McDonald, Norde,
Marion Hoey, and Gerometta, ran
the mile in the Ohio Relays in a
combined time of 3:12.5, the sec-
ond fastest in Michigan history.

KEEPS STANLEY CUP:
Montreal Wmins in Overtime, 3-2

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Henri Richard's
goal in sudden-death overtime
gave the Montreal Canadiens their
second straight Stanley Cup cham-
pionship last night, with a 3-2
overtime victory over the Detroit
Red Wings,
Richard pushed in the clinch-
ing goal at 2 minutes, 20 seconds
of the overtime period, crashing
into goalie Roger Crozier as he
scored.
That clinched the best-of-7 Na-
tional Hockey League playoff fin-
als four games to two.
It also was Montreal's 12th
Stanley Cup and seventh in the
In-f 11

that the Stanley Cup has been de-
cided on an overtime score.
Richard's goal came on Mon-
treal's second shot of the overtime
period. Richard and teammates
Dave Balon and Jean Guy Talbot
led the charge at the Detroit net.
and Richard steered the puck past
Crozier.
Floyd Smith sent the game into
the overtime when he deflected
Gary Bergmans shot from the
point at 10:30 of the third per-
iod.
The Red Wings, who had out-
shot the Canadiens 29-19 in the
first three periods, spotted them aI
two-goal lead,

Crozier kicked out a shot by Rich-
ard. But Montreal came right back
and Richard got the puck over
to Rochefort, who beat Crozier
from 15 feet out.
Ullman's goal came on a de-
flection of a shot from the left
point by Alex Delvecchio.
It was the first power play goal
for the Red Wings since the sec-
ond game of the finals, and only
their second of the series in 18
tries with a man advantage.

CECIL NORDE

BILL NEWTON

Wolverine Batsmen Lead
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i
1
I;
1
t

i .ag, the Canadiens be- Jean Beliveau opened the scor- Tiig I en 11 it
came only the second team. in the ing at the 9:08 mark of the first Bn
40-year modern history of the cup period when he knocked in Gilles
to initaftr osng hefistTremblay 's rebound from a sharp The Michigan baseball 'team
two games of the final series, angle and Leon Rochefort beat leads the conference in several
It was the first time since 1954 Crozier midway through the sec- team and individual departments
ond period. in the statistics released yesterday
" WT' Norm Ullman scored on a pow- from the Big Ten office in Chi-
Crozier W ins er play less than two minutes cago.
after Rochefort's score, and that's The Michigan team is leading
M VP Award the way things stood until Smith's in both batting and slugging and
dramatic tally. is second in team fielding.
Claude Provost started the play The Wolverines have a team
By The associated Prsswhich led to the first Montreal batting average of .314 in four
DETROIT-In some what of a goal. He took the puck at center conference games, 20 percentage
surprise, Detroit goalie Roger Cro- ice and passed it to Gilles Trem- points higher than second-place
zier was named the Most Valu- blay, streaking past the Detroit Minnesota.
able Player in the Stanley Cup blue line. At the other end of the stand-
playoffs. ings is Purdue, Michigan's oppo-
Crozier won the Conn Smythe Tremblay faked a couple o nent in a doubleheader tomorrow,
Trophy after Montreal defeated times before shooting but Crozier with a .164 average.
the Red Wings 3-2 on Henri Rich- stayed with him and kicked out Best Sluggers
ard's overtime goal, giving the Ca- the puck. It bounced over to Beli-Bs Sugr
veau, who fired from a sharp an- In slugging too, the Wolverines
nadiens their second straight gle at Crozier's left and beat him} have a big statistical edge over
Stanley Cup last night, four games from about 10 feet. their nearest rival Minnesota.
to two. Michigan has 63 total bases in 140
Besides the trophy, Crozier re- A little more than a minute be- times at bat for a .450 slugging
ceived $1000 and a 1966 automo- fore the Beliveau goal, Provost

masculine

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Crisp, tangy, persuasive. Old Spice ...
unmistakably the after shave lotion for
the untamed male. Try it soon ... she's
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S H U LTO N

t rRt tNtvf G4 r it

bile. The award was given after beat Crozier on a short shot from
balloting by the National Hockey in front of the net. But the play
League's board of governors. Mon- was ruled offside by linesman John
treal's Jean Beliveau won the first D'Amico.
award last year. Just before Rochefort's goal.

4

The authentic, traditional,
classic, conservative button
down. Very acceptable.

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Requirements: All disciplines considered (includ-
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Interested? Act Now. Send resume to Mr. M. W.
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GENERAL *T ELECTRIC
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Minnesota's percentage is .402.
In individual batting, Michigan
Captain Bob Gilhooley is second
with a .471 average. First place
Mike Holloway of Indiana is hit-
ting at a heady .583 pace after
three games.
Gilhooley is also tops in runs
batted in with nine. His nearest
competitor has only four.
Right fielder Al Bara is fifth in
the batting standings with a .400
average. Other Wolverine hitters
in the top twenty are Les Tanona,
11th; Chan Simonds, 13th; Rick
Sygar, 14th; and Keith Spicer,
18th.
Second in Fielding
In fielding Michigan ranks sec-
ond behind Ohio State with a
.962 percentage. The Wolverines
have made six errors. The Buck-
eyes have committed only one
error for a .987 percentage but
have played only two conference
gamnes.
ThesWolverines rank only sixth
in team pitching with a team

I

trng, luggng
earned run average of 2.38. OSU
is in first in this department also
with an 0.00 ERA.
Although the 'M' nine is not on
top in team pitching, right-hander
Bob Reed leads in several cate-
gories in the individual pitching
statistics.
In ratings of pitchers who have
at least one decision, Reed has
pitched in the most games and
has the most victories, both totals
standing at four.
Reed also leads in strikeouts
with 21 in 232/3 innings.
Although his earned run average
is 0.76, the Wolverine hurler is
tenth in this department. Seven
pitchers are tied for first with
ERA's of 0.00 including Bob Pogue
and Bill Murray of Illinois, the
Wolverines' opponent this after-
noon at 3:30.
With three weekends left on the
Big Ten schedule, Reed has a good
chance for smashing a long-stand-
ing conference record for the most
victories in a season-six.
Davis Cuppers
Win in Italy
By The Associated Press
ROME-Dennis Ralston and
Marty Riessen, members of the'
U.S. Davis Cup squad, joined an
unbroken march of seeded favor-
ites yesterday into the fourth
round of the Italian International
Tennis Tournament.
Julie Heldman of New York be-
came the lone American survivor
in the women's- division, rallying
for a 4-6, 6-2, 6-2 victory over
Silvana Lazzarino of Italy in the
third round.
Eliminated were Clark Graebner
of Beachwood, Ohio, another U.S
Davis Cup team member; Bob
Greene of Los Angeles, Bill Tym
of Montville, N.J., and 19-year-old
Kathleen Harter of Seal Beach.
Calif.
Greene was the victim of Ral-
ston, America's No. 1 player and
fourth seeded entry from Bakers-
field, Calif., 6-4, 6-1, 6-0. Ralston
raced through the first four
games, lapsed to lose , the next
four in a row and then ran out
the match easily.
The tempestuous Riessen had a
tougher time with Thomas Lejus
of the Soviet Union, finally win-
ning 6-2, 6-0, 3-6, 7-5 after de-
manding replacement of one of
the linesmen.
"He that rejecteth me and re-
ceiveth not my word, the sane
shall judge him in the last day."
-John 12:48
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

Russell Voted
Top Athlete
By Letter men
Cazzie Russell, the nation's
greatest college basketball player,
is slated to receive another award
in his long string of honors as his
fellow Michigan letterwinners have
voted him the top senior athlete
of the year.
President Harlan Hatcher will
present the annual award to three-
time All-American Russell as a
part of Cazzie Russell day in Ann
Arbor on May 17.
The day has been named to
honor the greatest basketball play-
er in Michiganhhistory and the
only player to have his ni mbe.r
retired-the big 33 familiar to all
Wolverine sports fans.
The award will be presented in
connection with the annual outing
of the Ann Arbor Quarterback
Club at the Barton Hills Country
Club. The Quarterback Club is the
sponsor of the award.
In addition to the award pres-
entation, Coach Dave Strack will
discuss the great era in which
Russell played and football coach
B u m p Elliott and gymnastics
coach Newt Loken will also speak.
Toastmaster for the dinner will
be Don Lund, who coached Mich-
igan's n a t i o n a l championship
baseball team in 1962.
Tickets for the event may be
purchased at Wikel Drug or at the
country club on the day of the
presentation.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Cleveland 14 4 .933 -
Baltimore 12 3 .800 2
Chicago 10 6 .625 41/
California 11 7 .611 42
Detroit 11 8 .579 5
Minnesota 7 7 .500 6
Washington 6 10 .375 S!{
Boston 5 12 .294 10
New York 4 15 .211 12
Kansas City 3 14 .176 12
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
California 1, Kansas City 0
Cleveland 4, New Yrk 0
only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at California (n)
Washington atKansas City (n)
Boston'at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Chicago (n)
cleveland at Baltimore (n)

4-;}

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Anything more would give you too
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Back collar button, box pleat and
hanger loop. Tapered to a T.
"Sanforized-Plus", in a wash and
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Bold New Breed by 7
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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 9, L. Angeles 8 (10 inn)
Atlanta 4, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati 10, Pittsburgh 6
Houston 4, Chicago 3 (13 inn)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at New York (n)
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (n)
San Francisco at St. Louis (n)
Atlanta at Houston (n)
Los Angeles at Cincinnati (n)
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