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May 06, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRmmAY. MAV a1014

PAGE TWO ~'PTflA~T ThTA~?D IOOB
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MUSIC
Festival Opener Lacks Polish

'U' Budget Request Faces Major Revisions

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Program
Piston . Toccata for Orchestra
Donizetti . . . "Tranquillo ei
posa"; "Com, e bello quale in-
canto" from Lucrezia Borgia
Donizetti . . . "E Sara in quest
orribili momenti"; "Vivi In-
grato" from Roberto Devereux
Bellini ... Grand Scene (Finale)
from Il Pirata .
Sibelius .-.. Symphony No. 2 in
D major, Op. 43
Ann Arbor's seventy-third May
Festival commenced with a fro-

licking orchestral showpiece, the
Piston "Toccata," last night in
Hill Aud.
The Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy, conductor,
showed spirit and vigor in this fun
but not too profound work. Their
ensemble clicked and attention
was aroused.
What many people came to see
(and hear), however, was the
Spanish-born soprano Montserrat
Caballe, who made her New York
debut only one year ago. She had
received rave reviews and Ann

4-F Draft Rejects Reluctant
To Remedy Physical Defects

DETROIT (AP)-Many men who
flunk their draft physicals ap-
parently prefer to remain fat,
fidgety and 4-F rather than try
to correct their defects, reports the
Detroit Health Department.
The department, taking part in
a medical program to help rejec-
tees, said it has received only 172
replies from 505 men to whom
corrective aid had been offeredj
after their rejection due to dis-
abilities.
"A lot of them may still be talk-
ing it over with their wives," said1
a health department official.
"Maybe they'll respond to our
second letter."
When a man is rejected for
medical reasons, nearby Fort'
Wayne sends a report to the health
department. The rejectee is asked
by letter to come in for consul-
tation. If there is no response a
second letter is sent.
No Compulsion
A rejectee is under no compul-
sion to accept the counseling. If
he does and his defect is corrected
he could be re-examined and pos-
sibly draft.
"The majority of the cases we
have received so far have involved
impairments that are readily cor-
rectable," said Dr. C. P. Anderson,
deputy h e a 1 t h commissioner,
"things like hypertension, over-
weight, impaired vision or hear-
ing.
"We will encourage them to go
to a private physician for treat-
ment," Anderson said. "If they are
reluctant to do so because they
don't have the money, we will

arrange for help by a public
agency."
He said no appointments with
the rejectees have been set yet,
pending receipt of enough replies
to set up a scheduling system.
Longer Lives
"We are not interested in quali-
fying young men for the draft,"
Anderson said. "The program was
meant to help them enjoy longer,
healthier lives."
Dr. John J. Hanlon, health com-
missioner of Detroit and Wayne
County, drew on experience from
an earlier program in Philadel-
phia in suggesting that the non-
participation trend might not hold
up.
In Philadelphia, Dr. Hanlon
found "a very interesting thing."
Often, he said, men classified
4-F were happy about it.
"'I've got it made,' they'd say.
I'm not going to be drafted,'"
Hanlon recalled.
So they would ignore the offer
of medical aid.
"Then the women in their lives
would make the difference," Dr.
Hanlon said. "After some days had
gone by the mother, or wife, or
girl friend would start wondering.'
IThey'd compare their men to
the man down the street who had
been found able and well and was
drafted.
In hurt pride, the 4-F would
start wonderng himself, Hanlon
said. Then he'd seek the medical
aid.'
Hanlon said he did not know the
proportion of such instances, but
added that he regarded it as
significant.

Arbor people wanted to hear for
themselves.
Lovely Voice
In her first Donizetti selection
Mme. Caballe displayed a lovely
voice, but no dramatic punch. And
opera is, after all, a musical-
dramatic expression, which cannot
rely on its musical member alone.
If Mme. Caballe would not just
stand there; if she would just
give a little motion-a turn of the
head or gesture with the hand-it
would be nice.
She gradually increased in ex-
pressivity and emotiveness in the
second Donizetti and the Bellini
excerpts, respectively.
Mine. Caballe is 'an economical
singer. She changes vocal registers
smoothly, omits unstylistic sliding
from one note to another, and
eliminates all superfluous techni-
cal gesticulation. Her voice is most
pleasing in all ranges, her intona-
tion is fine, her tone is clear.
Awkward Orchestra
Mme. Caballe's orchestral com-
plements in both Donizettis and
the Bellini did little to augment
her situation. The musical transi-
tions of mood and tempo were
awkward and the orchestra gen-
erally played not too loudly, but
too heavily. It seemed to forget
that it was accompanying just
one vocalist.
Sibelius is one of Ormandy's
specialities, along with the other
late Romantics. Last night was,
perhaps, an off night. Although
the spirit was there, the wood-
winds projected insecurely, the
transitions from section to section
within the movements were not
convincing, and the players them-
selves made more note mistakes
than one would expect from an
orchestra of such renown.
Ormandy did nice things with
the brass parts, making them soar
out or punctuate a particular
musical phrase, rather than per-
mitting them to be overpowered
by other elements. And best of all
was the way the series of cre-
scendos were controlled and built,
one upon the other, at the end of
the final movement, to stimulate
a rousing climax to the whole
event. Here Ormandy was at his
best.
Transcribed Bach
The encore was the "Air on the
G String," or the second move-
ment from J. S. Bach's Orchestral
Suite No. 3, presumably transcrib-
ed for orchestra by Mr. Ormandy.
It seems too bad that with the
great wealth of Romantic orches-
tral literature with the lush or-
chestrations, a musician deems it
necessary to arrange a composition
completely out of its historical
context when music just as ap-
propriate already exists. What are
we expected to listen to? Bach?
the transcriber? This is a question
of historical accuracy which each
must decide for himself.
The Philadelphia ensemble is
capable of much better work than
was heard last evening. Perhaps
now that they have again become
accustomed to the Ann Arbor cli-
mate we will get their very best.
Ph. 483-4680
&ttm" o0x CARPENTER RAD
OPEN 7:00
NOW SHOWING
SHOWN AT 0
7:45 £& 12:00 114t,3' i
M AMAV1SN- And MEIWOCOtOR
ALSO-Shown at 10:15 Only

(Continued from Page 1)
sell more taxes, we will have to
live with what we've got."'
In addition to the hearings
Montgomery reported he and oth-
er committee members will tour
the University. The Detroit Demo-
crat said he is particularly in-
terested in the Center for Resarch
on Learning and Teaching as it
is a new item in the University
budget.
Original Bill
Montgomery's original bill would
appropriate money on a line-item
basis instead of the traditional
lump sum. He planned to work out
the budget according to the Uni-
versity's $65 million request, but
now will follow the Senate fig-
ure, applying a "shrink factor" to
University fiscal data.
The original bill would limit
University out-of-state enrollment
to 20 per cent of the student body.
The University would lose $600 per
non - resident student enrolled
above that ceiling. Currently, 27
Per cent of the University's stu-
dents come from outside Michi-
gan.
Montgomery commented that
this provision was "subject to ne-

gotiation." He pointed
other legislators want
cent instead of 20 per
ing.

out that'
a 15 per
cent ceil-

No Subsidy
"The principle is that Michigan
is not going.to subsidize out-of-
state students. They should pay
for going to school here. But since
our students benefit from them
the proposal to pay for 20 per
cent of them is not unreasonable,"
he explained.
Both versions would also deduct
from the state appropriations any
money raised by a tuition hike.
The original version only pro-
vided $45 million since Montgom-
ery lacked the information to
completely fill out the line-item
format. The University has since
provided the necessary data.
'U' Delay?
"We didn't have the numbers
until after the (April 22) deadline.
The University thought it smart
to wait until after the deadline,"
Montgomery declared.
Niehuss contended that the Uni-
versity supplied the data as fast
as It could, getting breakdowns
that had not previously been sub-
mitted to Lansing.

The University's $3.5 million
capital outlay appropriation pass-
ed the Senate and awaits a sim-
ilar fate of detailed scrutiny in the
House.
Criticize Accounting
Montgomery also rapped the
University's accounting methods.
"The University has one of the
f i n e s t business administration
schools in the country which
teaches and does advanced cost
accounting research," he noted.
"Yet the University says It doesn't.
share this. I assume this to be a
falsehood for it is incongruous
for the University not to have
cost accounting when it trains peo-
ple in it."

Niehuss said he did not want.
to be drawn into a controversy
over the issue. He noted that the
University does practice cost ac-
counting, but that this technique
was difficult for educational in-
stitutions.
He said he thought Montgom-
ery and others who make this sort
of criticism are interested in what
the University would do if some
item were cut. The University can't
really answer this question until
such action actually has to be
taken, he commented.
No Autonomy Violation
Montgomery asserted that his
line-item budget does not violate'
the University's constitutional au-

bedifeen.

MMMMM6r .

Welcome Students
Open 6 Days a Week
U-M BARBERS
Near Kresge's
OR
DASCOLA BARBERS
Near the Michigan Theatre
-AIR CONDITIONED-

I

U

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

tonomy. "To do anything other
than a detailed budget would be
an abrogation of the Legisla-
ture's responsibility for the peo-
ple's money.
"The Legislature should have a
detailed budget proposal, pass a
line-item budget and follow it
with a post-audit to see how the
money was spent.
"A program budget doesn't re-
strict the University's functioning
-if it supplies the information,"
he concluded.
The Detroit Democrat was opti-
mistic about University-Legislature
relations. "We have a good pro-
posal before the House. I antici-
pate some progress. Next year will
be different."

I

SABBATH SERVICES
are inaugurated TONIGHT
7:15 P. M.
1429 Hill St.

Dial 662-6264

ENDING SATURDAY

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-TONIGHT-
THE LAST BRIDGE"
AN AWARD WINNING FILM
will be presented by the
Ecumenical Campus Ministry as
the first in a dinner-film series
at the
Presbyterian Campus Center-6:30 P.M.
1432 Washtenaw Reservations: 662-3580
I Cost: $1.25 (dinner and film)
MAY.8
MICHIGAN UNION
MAIN DINING ROOM d
Breakfast 8-10 A.M.
Dinner 12:30-2:00 P.M.
5:45-7:30 P.M.
Phone 662-4431 for reservations

I

"BATTLE OF THE
P DRAG RACERS"
L Featuring Rad-Runner
and Speedy-Gonzales
U 40 Minutes of the Fastest
Characters in the Cartton World

Ii

at the

i

The Great Pie Fight... The Mad Automobile Race...
The Western Saloon Brawl... The Sheik's Tent...
The Devilish Dirigicycle... The Fiend's Dungeon... The Sinking Iceberg...
Some of the gems in

Shows Daily
at
1:00-3:-30
6:1.5,9:00

MICHIGAN

ey grealtst
comedy of ~all time

Monday, May 9-10:00 P.M.
THE RESIDENT HALL FORUM
at Alice Lloyd Hall
"New Tensions in the Feminine Sex Role"
Resource Person: Dr. Jean Butman
ISR Project Director

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