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July 01, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-01

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FRIDAY, JULY 1,1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

£ £rJZ LZAZnu

.SUc
By The Associated Press
4 Striking in an arc above Hanoi,
U.S. jets rained bombs and rockets
on three more fuel depots yester-
day in the new drive to cut off oil
for North Viet Nam's war ma-
chine. Pilots said smoke and
flames marked the targets as they
pulled away.
Navy fliers from the carrier
Constellation, in a related move
aimed at curbing the Commun-
ists' air warning system, reported
the obliteration of three radar
vans and 16 support buildings at
Kep, 38 miles northeast of Hanoi.
Coinciding with the blows above
the 17th Parallel was a stiff
ground battle 50 miles north of
Saigon in which American infan-

ontinues

Hanoi Bombing, Notifies

UN

trymen and planes were reported
to have killed 300 men of a Com-
munist regiment.,
Stop Fuel
The new American air offensive
is aimed to deprive North Viet
Nam of fuel for its trucks and
other carriers that ferry troops
and supplies along infiltration
routes to combat arenas in South
Viet Nam.
The three fuel depot raids fol-
lowed up the dramatic, contro-
versy-stirring attacks Wednesday
on oil installations of Hanoi and
Haiphong that Maj. Gen. Gilbert
L. Meyers, deputy commander of
the U.S. 7th Air Force, termed
"the most significant, most im-
portant strike of the war."

One aim of U.S. air strikes close
to Hanoi and Haiphong, Washing-
ton says, is to make North Viet
Nam's support of the Viet Cong
war more costly. Another may
have been to change the Com-
munist North's attitude toward
peace talks.
Notifies U.N.
In New York, the United States
notified the U.N. Security Coun-
cil last night of the bombing of
the Hanoi and Haiphong oil facil-
ities and said it "will continue its
search for peace in Viet Nam."
It suggested that the Geneva
Conference be reconvened to "re-
affirm and revitalize" the 1954
and 1962 agreements for peace in
Indochina.

"This action has been made
necessary," U.S. Ambassador Ar-
thur J. Goldberg wrote, "by a
substantial increase in the level
of infiltration of armed men and
war supplies from North Viet Nam
into South Viet Nam-an increase
in which petroleum products have
been a key factor.
"Every effort has been made to
prevent harm to civilians and to
avoid destruction of nonmilitary
facilities.
In Washington, Senate debate
over the bombing brought calls
yesterday for a new U.S. peace of-
fensive and expressions of fear
that it is another step toward
"the ultimate war."
Mixed in with the criticism,

though, were endorsements from
some who called the bombing long
overdue.
"Prudence and good sense" were
behind Wednesday's attack, Un-
dersecretary of State George W.
Ball said, as he rejected Chairman
J. W. Fulbright's description of
the bombing as an act of escala-
tion.
Foreign Reactions
Overseas, condemnation came
from Communist sources while the
Vatican voiced regret over the new
phase of the war.
At the 17-nation disarmament
meeting in Geneva, Soviet dele-
gate Alexei A. Roschin said the
raids prove the United States is
aggressor in Viet Nam and dele-

gates from other Communist na-
tions echoed this theme.
In editorials, the Arab national-
ist press applied such terms as
"shocking" and "imperialist" to
the U.S. air strikes.
Demonstrations
In New York demonstrators pro-
testing the bombing staged a si-
lent vigil and sitdown yesterday
at the entrance to the U.S. mis-
sion to the United Nations.
About 60 other demonstrators
stood silently at the curb carrying
placards,
But President Johnson said the
Communists believe political dis-
agreements in Washington and
confusion and doubt in the United
States will hand them victory in
South Viet Nam, but that they are
wrong.
Predicts Success
"We will not let our differences
deter us from success," he said.
"We will not permit the confusing
sweep of Vietnamese politics, or
the, shadowy nature of guerrilla
warfare, to paralyze our will to
go on.

"We shall succeed."
Johnson discussed the war in
Viet Nam and the prospects for,
peace as he sees them in a speech
in Omaha, Neb., his first stop on
a fast-moving day of speech-mak-
ing and handshaking.
In his Omaha speech before a
barge loaded with grain for India,
Johnson said he is convinced that
after decades of war and threats
of war, "peace is more within our
reach than at any time in this
century."
London
In London, angry members of
the House of Commons demanded
to be heard on Viet Nam promptly
but the government would only
promise a general debate on for-
eign affairs before Prime Min-
ister Harold Wilson goes to Wash-
ington for talks with President
Johnson late in July.
Wilson's statement Wednesday
disassociating the British govern-
ment from the U.S. raids on tar-
gets around Hanoi failed to molli-
fy the left wing of his Labor
Party.

NUCLEAR TESTING:
French To Start Test Series;*
Anticipate H-Bomb Explosion

PARIS (/P)-The French quest
for great power status is about to
switch from a diplomatic offen-
sive to a series of nuclear tests de-
signed to arm her with a big
power weapon - the hydrogen
bomb.
A final warning note to ship-
ping and aircraft sent out Monday

said the series should start in a pair in September, capping a
French Polynesia anytime begin- program of preparations that has

"For there can be only oned
cision in Viet Nam. We shall
this through. We shall persist.

de-
see

ning today - the day President
Charles de Gaulle comes home
from his visit to the Soviet Union
and talks with Kremlin leaders.
Informed French sources say the
test series will involve six bombs
-two in July, two in August and

taken more than two years.

~

ISNCC ix-Chairman
Hands in Resignation,

-Associated Press
A HUGE COLUMN OF SMOKE rises over the Hanoi petroleum,
oil and lubricant storage area after bombing raids Wednesday by
U.S. Air Force F105 Thunderchiefs,
DAILY O'FFICIAL BULLETIN

100 Kilotons
The first two bombs, said to
have explosive power of less than
100 kilotons each, will be fired
from a tower in the Mururoa La-
goon, and will contain no thermo-
nuclear material.
One, if not both, of the next two,
also non-thermonuclear, will be
dropped from a Mirage IV bomb-
er, the kind used to carry the
French nuclear deterrent.
Informants say the third pair of
bombs will contain some thermo-
nuclear material--lithium, tritium
or deuterium, for example-put-
ting the French on the threshold
of developing a hydrogen bomb.
An attempt w explode a full-
fledged H-bomb is not scheduled
before the first of the year. In-
deed, reports in the informed
French press indicate that French
researchers may 'be having some
difficulty in bridging the gap from
nuclear fission to thermonuclear
explosions.

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!"
-N. Y. Post -N. Y. Daily News
i'1ad
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
otficial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, JULY I
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center :ilm
preview-Laserg and Automation: the
Next Revolution: Multipurpose Room,
Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-The Thief of Bagdad:
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Department of Speech University
Players Performance - William Shake-
speare's "A winter's Tale": Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
General Noticest
Regents' Meeting: July 29. Communi-.
cations for consideration at this meet-
4L ing must be in the President's hands
not later than Thursday, July 14.
Persons interested in ushering for the
Summer Piano Concert Series, in Rack-
ham Auditorium during July, and those'
who signed for this service during the
May Festival please call Mr. Warner,
NO 8-8597.
' Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat., July 9
at the Downtown Post Office, Main &
Catherine at 9 a.m. To take test, ques-
tionnaire must be completed. Details
and applic. avail, at Bureau of Ap-
points., 3200 SAB.
Peace Corps, Africa-Grads to serve
as teachers in Ghana, Kenya, Liberia,

talawi. Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda.
Teaching, exper. and certif. not req.
Trng. programs begin in Sept., Oct. and
Nov. Elementary and Secondary teach-
ers for math, science, English, geog.,
indust. arts, phys. educ., etc. Applic,
avail. at Bureau.
POSITION OPENINGS:
A. O. Smith, Milwaukee - Various
openings including 1. Prod. Control
Mgr., Degree in Bus. Ad. or Engrg. plus
3-5 yrs. exper. 2. Supv. Gen. Acctg.
Accountant with 5-7 yrs. exper. in
indust. acctg. 3. Jr. Commercial Pro-
grammler. Degree in math or bus, re-
lited area. 4. Supv. EDPM Ops. Degree.
interest in supv. in computer ctr. 5.
Tech. Librarian, Degree in Lib. Sci., 2
yrs. exper. 6. Sales Engr. BSEE, no
exper. req. Many engrg positions also
av il.
Nav y Dept., .avidaTaylor ModelrBas-
in, Wash., D,.C.-Naval Arch., Degree in
engrg. or naval arch. 3 yrs. prof. arch.
or engrg. exper. Also Tech. Director,
Degree in engrg., Engrg. mgmt., physics
or naval arch. Exper. in exec. mgt. of
RW. & tD.
Commonwealth of Kentucky, Frank-
fort-Actuaries. Trained in actuarial
sci. or broad trng. in math and insur-
ance. Work in casualty and life fields
In St.ate Dept. of Insurance.
gSttt Consultants, Boston, Mass. -
Chief Engr. for Penn. mfr. of elect.
ots. Adv. degree in ceramics,
pyicor mat'l. sci. pref. BS plus
significant exper. Knowl. of sintering
and control of elect. properties in prod.
pro(cescs.
Iparcourt, Brace & World, Inc., Chi-
cago-College Textbook Salesman. De-
gree with broad lib. arts foundation.
Age 21-35. Call on faculty members in
territ. of 2-3 states to promote textbook
sales. Trng. program begins Aug. 1.
Apply now for Midwest sales location.
Personnel Consultants, N.Y.C.-Chief
Accountant to maintain corp. acctg.
aend bkkpg. systems. Degree in Acctg.,
ability as supv., some knowl of EDP.
The Trane Co., La Crosse, Wis.-Me-
tallurgical Engr. responsible for all
casting done for company. BS Metal.
Engrg. or Metallurgy plus 5 yrs. foun-
dry exper. Urgent need.
Wilson & Co., Chicago-Sr. Res. Bio-
chemist. PhD in Biol. Sci., 0-5 yrs. lab.
exper. Up to 40 yrs old.
S* *
For further info., please call 764-7460
General Div., Bureau of Appoints,
3200 SAB.

ATLANTA, Ga. ()-Underscor-
ing a struggle over what direction
the civil rights movement takes,1
an officer and former chairman of
the Student Nonviolent Coordi-i
nating Committee said yesterday 1
he is quiting the organization. 1
"It is a bad assumption for any
group to say it can make it alone,"c
said John R. Lewis, 26, who hasr
submitted his resignation fromz
SNCC effective July 22 after six
years with the organization.
Lewis said he disagrees with
SNCC's new slogans of "Black
Power," but did not specify that
as his reason for resigning.
Ideological Dispute
Disclosure of Lewis' decision
came amidst controversy within
the civil rights movement over
ideology and tactics.
Stokely Carmichael, 24, elected
chairman of SNCC when Lewis
was unseated May 14, defended
Black Bower during and after the
march. He said it was neither
Black supremacist nor antiwhite.
Non-Violence
Lewis, who was named chair-
man of SNCC's Committee on In-
ternational Affairs in the May
elections, said he was concerned
over keeping the civil rights move-
ment nonviolent.
In Washington, D.C., Sen. Rob-
ert F. Kennedy says that "Black
Power," with its implication that
white leadership is not needed,
"could be damaging not only to
the civil rights movement but to
the country."
"Thou shalt love the Lord thyI
God with all thy heart, with all
thy soul, and with all thy mind."
Matthew 22:37
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

Asked specifically about the
"black power" slogan popularized
by Carmichael, he replied, "I think
it is very damaging. Civil rights is
primarily a problem for white peo-
ple and white people obviously
have to play a major role in find-
ing the solution. The implications
of that statement were that white
people are not to have really any
role other than bystanders."

I a,

PLUS-"JALOPY-JOCKEY"
In Color
2 COLOR CARTOONS

.-m.j

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO ENTER
THE FIELD OF MENTAL HEALTH
The Michigan Department of Mental Health operates one of the largest
and most progressive mental health programs in the country. In its search
for ways to provide better treatment, it has decided to make greater use of
individuals with only bachelor's level training.
A few promising applicants will be selected to participate in this special
social work program. They will have the opportunity of working with
experienced professionals in all mental health fields, social work, psy-
chology, nursing and psychiatry. Those who show potential for further
training may receive an attractive stipend from the Department for gradu-
ate training in social work.
Starting salary will be $6,013. Excellent fringe benefits provided by Mich-
igan Civil Service.
Applications are invited from both spring and summer term graduates.

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TONIGHT
I FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR: I
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KORDA, POWELL and BERGER I
mTheThie fof Bagdad
I (1941)
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CONTACT:
Ivan E. Estes, Personnel Director
Michigan Department of Mental Health
Lewis Cass Building
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AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

A I t"1 I t^ ! r I

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EVENING OPTIMIST CLUB
presents
Outdoor Band Concert

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A Wild Colorful Escape
into Fantasy and Fun!.
1 _1
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SABU, CONRAD VEIDT, and REX INGRAMI
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Passport Pictures
Application Pictures
Group Pictures
Wedding Pictures
Available at any time
Ready Quickly
CALL NO 3-6966

i

PRESENTATIONS

I

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FRIDAY, JULY 1

. . .9-12 P.M:

featuring RICH BLOCH and HIS GASLITERS
at GERMAN PARK (5 miles north on Pontiac Trail)

You MUST Be 21

Donation $1.00
Bring Identification

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
(Dept. of Speech) present
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S
THE IWINTER'S TALE

TODAY
BOX OFFICE and
.r 'am wI T wanrr

The Third Annual
SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
Four Piano Recitals in Rackhan Auditorium
ALFREDI BRENDEL ..... . . July 6, 8:30
Duport Variations, K.573 ................................Mozart
Sonata in A minor, K. 310.......................Mozart
Symphonic Studies, Op. 13.............................Schumann
Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 3..................................Liszt
Bagatelle without tonality........................:..........Liszt
Pensees des Mortz....................................Liszt
Toccata .................................. ..............Busani
PETER SERKIN......... July 14, 8:30
Sonata in E major, Ap. 14, No. 1............... ........Beethoven
Sonata in G major, Op. 14, No. 2......................Beethoven
Sonata in E major, Op. 100..........................Beethoven
Sinfonien (3-part Inventions)..............................Bach
EVELYN CROCHET ..... .. July 20, 8:30
Fantasy and Fugue in A minor..............................Bach
Three Pieces, Op. 11.................................Schoenberg
Sonata in D major, K. 311............................. ..Mozart
Three Pieces, Op. posthumous........................Schubert

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