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May 05, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-05

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUR$DAY, MAY 5, 1966

PAGE EIGHT ~~lE MIIANAIYTRSAAY,16

PARTY CONTROLLED:
Nominations Under Way,
For Next Soviet Election

MOSCOW (P) - Nomination of
candidates began recently for next
June's Soviet parliamentary elec-
tions--with election results already
arranged by the Communist par-
ty machine.
Factory workers and "public or-
ganizations" nominated the peo-
ple assigned to them by the par-
ty. Initial publicity focused or
party boss Leonid I. Brezhnev
nominated at a woolen mill, and
other leaders.
After a lot more publicity, 99
per cent of the Soviet voters will
approve on June 12 the choices
in 1,517 parliamentary constitu-
encies.
Soviet elections do not offer
voters any choice of candidates
or of programs. They have a dif-
ferent purpose than letting the
people decide the country's future
Once elected, members of the
Supreme Soviet Parliament will
ratify without significant change
the laws which are presented to
them. Voting is always unanimous
The laws are based on Com-
munist party decisions. And those
decisions come from Brezhnev's
small group of party leaders, whose
policy declarations to a recent
party congress were approved un-
questioningly.
The purpose of the elections is
to obtain publicity for party pro-
grams. Instead of decisions being
transmitted up from the voters
party decisions are transmitted
down to them by the Soviet elec-
tion process.

Brezhnev told the congress that'
party units "must completely
eliminate their petty guardianship{
of government bodies and the
practice of overriding them, which
gives rise to irresponsibility and
inertness on the part of officials.'
Calls for More News
He also called for the parlia-
mentary leadership, of which he is
a member, to tell the Supreme So-
viet more about what is going on.
"The work of deputies must be-

Supreme Soviet and automatically
ratified at the next sitting.
Brezhnev's reform proposals did
not include having contested elec-
tions. The Soviet ballot says a
voter should strike out all but one
name. In fact, only rarely is more
than one' name on the ballot.'
Write-ins invalidate a vote.
There has been some talk of
putting the names not of one but
of several candidates on a ballot.
But Brezhnev did not mention this
and nothing has been heard of it

'U'F
Sees
Pric
McCra
Contin
Expan
Prof. Pat
business a
predicted th
continue to
more than t
McCracke
tinued ecor
a 7.5 perc
number of g
ing 1966.

xpert
More
e Rises
cken Predicts
ued Economic
sion, GNP Gain
ul W. McCracken of
administration school
hat prices probably will
rise this year, but not
three per cent.
n also forecast con-
nomic expansion and
cent rise in the total
goods and services dur-
t expect the year to
er increases in costs
especially industrial
said.
nomy did shoot ahead
iing much of the last
" he explained, "and
ncreases thereby gen-
be showing up in the
ad.
the price rise for 1966
three per cent will re-
rate by international
and will do far less
the economy than
attempts through
cajolery to hold prices
rce," McCracken con-

Collegiate Press Service
ATLANTA - The normally
gloomy report of the AAUP's Com-
mittee Z-the committee on the
economic status of the profession
-sounded a happy note this year
as it announced that the salaries
of the nation's college teachers
are higher than ever before-
up 7.3 per cent over last year.-
The report, which was released
Friday at the association's annual
meeting, noted that the percentage
rise was the highest of any year
this decade and that for the first
time since 1957 faculty pay has
risen at a rate considered essen-
tial to meet the goals of the Presi-
dent's Committee on Education
beyond High School.
That advisory body, reporting
to former President Eisenhower,
set as a national target the doubl-
ing of faculty salaries before 1970.
Southern Salaries Up
The Southern states have been
important beneficiaries of the in-
creased salaries, the report said,
and thus the gap between the
South and the rest of the nation
has narrowed.

Notably, of the five schools
said to have increased salaries by
the greatest percentage in the
current year, three are in the
South-The University of Ken-
tucky, Tuskegee Institute in Ala-
bama, and Pan American College
in Texas. The other two were Par-,
sons College (Fairfield, Iowa) and
Wheelock College (Boston, Mass.)
The average salary for a full pro-
fessor at a university in the
South was reported to_ be $13,000,
compared with $15,602 for the rest
of the country. In church-related
liberal arts colleges, the full pro-
fessor's average salary was $10,554.
"Over the past two years the
acceleration in compensations for
all ranks has been quite steady
and quite remarkable," the report
said.
Prof. William Baumol of Prince-
ton, chairman of the committee,
said that this year's increases had
been most substantial at the top
ranks. In fact, he said, this is a
pattern seen in past reports-the
higher the rank, the more rapid.
the percentage increase in pay.

AAUP Announces Professors' Salaries
Increasing, Up 7.3 Per Cent over Last Year

During 1965-1966, the report said session teaching pay, research
that the average salary for all fac- grants, or consulting appointments.
ulty members reached $9,816. Assistants 'Slave Labor'
While the average dollar increase On the other hand, none of the
at the lowest level, the instructor, statistics include part-time faculty
was only $445, it was $1,035 for members and teaching assistants.
full professors. In many universities these assist-
'Great Differences' ants carry much of the burden of
undergraduate instruction. The
The average pay for full pro- report noted they are entrusted
fessors in the top pay category with major teaching assignments
of "AA" stood at $23,290. In the are paid on a much lower scale,
lowest category-an "F" and are generally referred to as
-the same academic rank aver- "academic slave labor."
aged only $7,160, thus underlining T. --

come more lively,"he said- in the mounting election publicity 'We mus
It has been very dull in the indicating Soviet voters still have show furth
past. Most key governmental de- a time to wait before facing the and prices,
cisions are announced between the novelty of a choice at the ballot prices," he&
two brief annual sessions of the box.
- --------_______ ______.______ The econ
too fast du:
* six months,
StudentsAssaorthe price in
erated will1
" -I 1 months aheE
Role in Planning usin"Even so,
of not overt
mrain mode
Continued from Page 1) The only fairly effective work it standards
and Finance Wilbur K. Pierpont has managed to accomplish was damage to
established the student housing a voter registration drive for strong-arm
advisory committee. During the graduate students. threats and
same semester, Student Govern- But, the University has tradi- by brute fo
mnI nii nn il~ nne,.-1. .1..... ..i.. .c__ <._

the great differences between in-
stitutions.
While the nationwide average
salary for full professors is $13,-
500 and for instructors, $6,740,
one church-related liberal arts col-
lege reported that it pays full pro-
fessors only $6,300 and instructors
only $4,300.
The report noted that, for its
purposes, all academic salaries are
figured on a nine-month basis.
This means that actual salaries
tend to be considerably higher
with the addition of either summer

In terms of average compensa-
tion, including fringe benefits, of
all full-time faculty members,
Harvard University led the asso-
ciation's list. Harvard was the only
university listed in the "$17,500
and above" category.
The University of Chicago and
Parsons College were in the next
category of $16,000 to $16,499.
Parsons, formerly a church-re-
lated institution, has stressed
management efficiency combined
with a curriculum of relatively few
courses as a means of raising fac-
ulty salaries.

nent Council voted tunus to a
Student Housing Association.
While the housing advisory
committee has searched for an
integrated solution to .student
housing problems and developed
several concrete plans for both
married and single student units,
SHA's work has been fragmented.

tionally followed a policy of non- tinued.
interference with private enter- He forecast a 1966 Gross Na-
prise, and any student group, no tional Product of $725 billion to
matter how cogent its arguments $730 billion-"about 7.5 per cent
and dilligent its research is, may above that for 1965."
have an arduous task trying to
convince administrators and Re-
gents to construct University-own- ontrc ors
ed single student apartments.

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Ask Federal
Aid in Strike
By The Associated Press
Michigan's crippling construc-
tion strike entered its third day
yesterday amid indications the
federal government has been asked
to intervene.
Several construction worker lo-
cals struck their contractor-em-
ployers Monday to enforce new-
contract proposals.
George Bowman, a member of
the negotiating committee of the
Flint Area Contractors Association,
said Tuesday he has talked with an
:!.d of W. Willard Wirtz, U.S see-
retam'y of labor, hoping "to get a
federal or top-level investigation
of contracts in this area.'
Bowman said car'penters in the
Sat' maw valley wem'e making wage
demands greatly exceeding the 3.2
per ct'nt per year wage-price
maidelme advocated by President
Johnson's Council of Economic Ad-
x >0'r. The masocmation has reiused
tallow m mber's of Carpenter's
Local 2123 : d work on its project
wt hunt a contract. T e caurre ente s
ueim this a locko.tt
Bowvman saidi the assot'iationl has
offered carpenters a five per cent
wage hike over thiree years. He
said Local 2123 is demanding $1.10
an hor' plus increased fringe
benefits over' their cu'irent $4.21.
This woiks out to 26er 1 cent
cent a year.
"This is wayv over Presidenti
Johnson's th'ree Pi'r cent wage hike
uidelines," Bowman said.
SUCKING SWAMP WATER IN A
COUPLE OF COURSES? THE
DRAFT MAKING YOU SWEAT?
SAVE YOURSELF WITH
INSTANT SILENCE
For information on how to improve
your concentration and study more
efficiently during finals, write to:
ACADEMIC AIDS
P. 0. Box 969
Berkeley, Calif. 9470 1

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