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June 17, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-06-17

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FRIDAY, JUNE 17,1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

FRIDA, JUE 17 196 T~i MICIGANDA----AG

1 Y -

Soviets May
Leave from
Germany
Speculate Move May
Be Precipitated by
French Withdrawal
BERLIN (P)--Speculation arose
yesterday that the French pull-
out from the Atlantic alliance mil-
itary command may be accom-
panied by a withdrawal of some
Soviet troops from Communist
East Germany.
The question of Soviet inten-
tions is being discussed against the
background of President Charles
de Gaulle's 11-day visit to the
Soyiet Union starting Monday.
The West German papers Die
Welt and Bild Zeitung carried re-
ports Wednesday quoting informed
sources that the Soviets would
pull out five divisions from East
Germany. Die Welt said the pow-
er gap would be filled with great-
er firepower in the form of more
missiles.
Western military observers say
Soviet forces in East Germany now
total up to 400,000 men with
amout 22 divisions.
The rash of published and other
speculative reports concerning So-
viet military intentions in East
Germany gained impetus with the
disclosure last Sunday by the East
Germans of the gathering of the
Soviet, Polish, Czechoslovakian'
and East German defense minis-
ters in East Berlin.
Also present were a number of
ranking Soviet officers, including
Soviet Marshal Andrei Grechko,
supreme commander of the War-
saw Pact alliance.
Die Welt said 'that the planned
Soviet withdrawal from East Ger-
many was financial, not strategic.
The East Germans long have ar-
gued with Moscow for lower costs
in the maintenance of Soviet
troops.
Independent-minded Romania
also has been reported seeking a
lower financial contribution to the
Warsaw Pact. Romanian Commu-
nist party leader Nicolai Ceaucescu
has even called for the abolish-
ment of both the Warsaw Pact
and the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization.
The French will withdraw their
forces from under NATO com-

I

North Viet Political Shakeup Ma
Contribute Force to Peace Moves

By The Associated Press
A behind-scenes struggle ap-
pears to have broken out anew
within the Politburo of the
North Vietnamese Communist par-
ty, possibly revolving about re-
ported new approaches, to peace
negotiations.
For the first time in three
years, the controlled party press
in Hanoi has re-entered the arena
of the world Communist feud, and
has by implication assailed Soviet
policy.
If, as is generally suspected, a
hard-line last-ditch element is
in control of the Hanoi Politburo,
the development this week might
reflect sharp suspicion of Soviet
motives with regard to the Viet
Nam conflict. It might also sig-
nify fear on the part of the
dominant faction that it could
lose its slim margin of control.
Fence Straddling
For some time, the Hanoi par-
ty and government carefully strad-
dled the fence between the belli-

cose Chinese Communists who
seemed to want to fight to the'
last Vietnamese, and the cautious
Russians, appearing anxious to
defuse a potential general war
situation in Southeast Asia.
Now, for the first time since
1963, the Hanoi press has turned
again to indirect castigation of the
Soviet Communists. The leading
newspaper, Nhan Dan, and the
newspaper Quan Doi Nhan Dan,
carried articles this week de-
nouncing President Tito of Yugo-
slavia. This one way of express-
ing annoyance with Moscow.
One of them accused Tito of
"sinking into the quagmire of
modern revisionism" and collabor-
ating with the United States in
a search for a route to peace.-
"Modern revisionism," in the Com-
munist lexicon, means the policy
not of Tito but of the Soviet
Communist party.
Peace Plot
The Chinese, who no longer
bother to be indirect about their

attacks, constantly accuse the
modern revisionists of collaborat-
ing in a Viet Nam "peace plot"
with the United States.
The Hanoi articles accused Yu-
goslavia of "praising the United
States and criticizing Viet Nam
and China," and of blaming "Viet
Nam and China for provoking the
United States." Tito is accused of
"a shameful role" and of proving
"an out-and-out henchman of the
United States." Substitute Rus-
sians for Yugoslavs in these state-
ments, and they faithfully echo
Peking.
Mild Discussions
Recently, Soviet leaders have
been remarkably mild in discuss-
ing Viet Nam. They have spoken
of "sober" U.S. leaders, as if sug-
gesting there might be some in
Washington with whom the Krem-
lin might profitably talk. They
have stressed that necessary aid
would go to the Viet Nam Com-
munists, which sounded less than
enthusiastic.

What may bother the domi:
group in Hanoi's Politburo is
there may be a means of gel
tp Ho Chi Minh, aging N
Vietnamese president and h
figure who often has seemec
much nationalist as Commu
Now again, in the West, the:
talk of new approaches direct]
Ho.
Direct Appeals
There is in all this distinct
sibility of appeals directly o
ident Ho, over the heads of
Politburo members. Suspicion
this and of Soviet conmplicit
the maneuvering 'could pro,
the Politburo's currently doml
faction to fire broadsides age
"modern revisionism" once aE
despite Hanoi's need for s
economic and: military aid.
It could be that the divisia
opinion in the Hanoi Politbu:
close enough to throw a scare
the pro-Peking element, and
Ho Chi Minh's influence migb
enough to tip the balance.

AT WEEKLY CONFERENCE
Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen of Illinois contended at the news conference he and GOP
Leader Gerald Ford of Michigan hold weekly that farmers and housewives are incensed at the ad-
minitration's holding down farm prices and trying to blame inflation on the nation's food producers.
FOR VIET NAM TALKS:
Manasfield Proposes Meeti ng
OfRush, Chinese Minister

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI-N
J'"::t.l.:M .. wt::.M:. ".t.w. rJ-.Y...}.. l ~rHN. :A CY.r."ft.Vh1:rY r ".r..".':."J "

WASHINGTON (M--Sen. Mike
Mansfield of Montana proposed
yesterday that Secretary of State
Dean Rusk and Chinese Foreign
Minister Chen Yi meet to explore
peace for Viet Nam. The State
Department cautiously encouraged
the idea but expressed doubt Pe-
king would agree.
Mansfield said in a speech at'
YeshivaUniversity the war in
Southeast Asia is threatening to
wind up as a war between the
United States and Communist
China as the Korean conflict did
15 years ago. For this reason, he
said, there is need for efforts
to establish a direct contact be-
tween Washington and Peking on
the problem of peace in Viet Nam
and Southeast Asia.

Press Officer Robert McCloskey
commented on the proposal: "The
secretary has read Sen. Mans-
field's statement with interest. As
always the President and the
secretary of state will give careful
consideration to the views of Sen.
Mansfield."
Mansfield spoke a day after a
flurry of new peace probe reports,
the most intriguing of which in-
volves a new Canadian mission to
Hanoi, capital of North Viet Nam.
It was confirmed in Ottawa on
Wednesday that Chester Ronning,
a special envoy and expert in Far
Eastern matters, had arrived in

the North Vietnamese capital on
his second mission this year.
In Paris, meanwhile, reports
were published that there is a
swelling interest in peace in Hanoi
and a feeling on the part of at
least some North Vietnamese lead-
ers that the time for negotiation
is ripening. U.S. authorities,
though deeply interested in such
reports, privately profess deep
skepticism.
Well-informed officials, how-
ever, do not rule out such a devel-
opment in North Vietnamese
thinking at present or in the
foreseeable future.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, JUNE 17
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Baha'i Student Group, Open discus-
sion: "'The New Word Order," Fri.,
June 17, 7:30 p.m., 2nd floor confer-
ence room,.Michigan Union.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction, open to everyone,
Fri., June 17, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.

Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Work-
shop-"Advanced Employment Inter-
viewing": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Cinema Guild-"The Sea Wolf": Ar-
chitecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Corning Glass Works, Corning, N.Y.
-Experienced personnel for Trades En-
gineering. BS in Industrial Engrg. and
some exper. In any -of the following:
plant layout, materials handling, sys-
tems engrg., job evaluation, methods
analysis, work measurement, PERT/
CPM.
Thomas M. Lowe, Jr. & Associates,
Inc., Atlanta, Ga.-Positions for new
grads in Civil, Mechanical and Electri-
cal Engineering. Also considering non-
grads with some college plus practi-
cal exper. Opening for an experienced
Highway Design Engineer for Charles-
ton, W. Va. office, requires registered
Civil Engr.
Detroit Country Day School, Birming-
ham, Mich.-Seek Business Manager,
well versed in business methods ac-
counting, and purchasing for schools,
prefer independent school or college
mgmt. bkgd. Will be required to teach
one small class in economics, a private
school, lower, grades Kindergarten-
6th, upper, boys only.
Rohmi and Haas Co., Philadelphia,
Pa.-Main office. Positions in Bris-
tol and Phila., Pa. and Columbus, Ohio.
Engineering-varied degrees and re-

quirements, including marketing, chem-
ical ,electrical, mechanical and textile
fields. Bus. Ad.-BS/MS Systems Anal.
1-5 yrs. "exper. Pharmacology-PhD, 0-8l
yrs. exper. MS/PhD 5-8 yrs. exper.
One MD position. Biological Sci.-BS.
0-5 yrs. Sales. training and interna-
tional division. Africultural Sci.-BS.
3-8 yrs. exper. sales rep.
State of Michigan-Various counties
throughout the state. Open exami-
nation for institution Social Worker.
Applicationstavailable at the Bureau
are due at the Dept. of Civil Service
no later than ,July 11, 1966. BA with
major in social science.
Central Region of Federal Aviation

Agency-North Central U.S. Aviatl
Safety Officer and airline pilot po
Lions. Flight time required for 1
latter, the former can accept deg
in aeronautical, production, or indu
trial engineering ror all but two ye
of experience, Apply for FSEE, fo
at Bureau. Full descriptive brochu
at Bureau.
For further information please c
764-7460, General Division, Bureau
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
PH. 482-2056
NO hM ENGTER RD
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v

mand July 1. This decision by de "This problem is of such tran-
Gaulle has left in doubt the fu- scendent importance that it is a
ture of some 72,000 Frenchmen fit question for face-to-face dis-
stationed in West Germany. cussion between China and the
Said one Western source: "In United States at the highest prac-
return for what de Gaulle has tcbelvl
done to NATO, the Russians will
want to give him something to go "Our secretary of state, Dean
home with when he leaves the Rusk, confronted the Chinese
Kremlin. They may feel the with-'I foreign minister, Chen Yi, across;
drawing of some of their forces the conference table at Geneva in
from East Germany as a gesture ! 1961-62 and it may be that a
toward easing tensions in Europe similar meeting now would be use-
might be just the thing." ful in this critical situation."
House, Senate Approve
Foreign Aid Program

rworld News Roundup
By The Associated Press sissippi civil rights march yester-
NEW YORK-Two tankers col- day when they attempted to pitch
lided in New York Harbor yester- the marchers' tents on a school

I

L

0

I

day, bursting into flames that grounds.
towered as high as a 10-story Those
building and spreading a sea of Carmicha
fire that engulfed and destroyed Nonviole
two tugboats. tee; Bob
and Binc
The Coast Guard said it had the Con
confirmed at least 17 persons died
in the holocaust at the narrow They w
entrance to Newark Bay between to jail, c
New Jersey and Staten Island,
where the British tanker Alva WASH
Cape and the American oiler Tex- clary su
aco Massachusetts came together. administ
* * Republic
GREENWOOD, Miss. - Police housingl
arrested three leaders of the Mis- test vote

arrested were Stokely
ael, head of the Student
nt Coordinating Commit-
bSmith, a SNCC worker
ce Baines, an officialkof
gress of Racial Equality.
were handcuffed and taken
harged with trespassing.
* * *
INGTON-A House Judi-
bcommittee, unhappy at
ration negotiations with
ans on a proposed open
law, yesterday ducked a
on the issue.

!

WASHINGTON (M' - President
Johnson's foreign aid program
was approved by House and Sen-
ate committees with only minor
money cuts yesterday, but in such
widely varying form as to assure
a long struggle ahead.
Johnson asked that Congress au-
thorize the program for five years,
saying this would make for more
intellilgent planning. The House
Foreign Affairs Committee voted
for a two-year authorization; the
Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee for one.
The Senate committee approved
two bills-economic assistance in
one, military aid in the other.
The House group wrapped upboth
types of aid in one bill. The ad-
ministration had asked for sep-
arate bills.
Both committees voted to au-
thorize more than $3.3 billion a
year, compared with the approxi-
mately $3.4 billion Johnson sought.
Chairman J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark) of the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee said he is not
certain he will support his
group's twobills in the final show-
down, although he said he thinks
he will handle them on the Sen-
ate floor.
He said his position will depend
on how the program is amended
by the Senate and presumably on

the outcome of a Senate-House
conference to iron out differences
between the varying versions.
Chairman Thomas E. Morgan
(D-Pa) of the House Foreign Af-
fairs Committee conceded the pro-
posed two-year authorization faces
a tough fight in the House, but
that: "I think we have a good
chance of holding it on the floor."
Morgan said he hopes to bring
up the bill in the House before the
start of a 10-dayrecess on June
30.
The only cut made by the House
committee was $700,000 in sup-
port of the United Nations' Pales-
tine refugees relief fund. The
committee completed action on the
bill, but put off until Monday a
formal vote to send it to the
House.
The House bill includes the $917
million the administration asked
for military assistance abroad. The
Senate group, in its final action
yesterday, cuth$25 million from
this figure. The Senate commit-
tee had finished work last week
on its economic aid bill.
All told, the Senate committee
cut $132 million from the admin-
istration's $3.4-billion program-
$117 million from economic assist-
ance and $25 million from mili-
tary aid.

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(Department of Speech) presents
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