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June 08, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-06-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAt" W.. Twullpilf

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8 ,1 9 6 6 T HE MICHIGAN IIAHY PA i'~U' U~wz~mvuP

A Ls.AEi U. A4imnb

Is+

King-
An Me
Victim of
Shooting To
Rejoin Walk
March Demonstrates
Importance of Vote
To Mississippi Negro
HERNANDO, Miss. (ยง)-Three
major civil rights leaders, shoved
into single file by Mississippi high-
way patrolmen, resumed James
H. Meredith's 'march against fear."
yesterday.
The march, picking up new
members as it straggled along U.S.
51, started at the spot where
- shotgun blasts felled Meredith, 33,
who cracked the racial barrier at
the University of Mississippi in
1962.
The leaders were Martin Luther
King, Jr., head of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference;
Floyd McKissick, director of the
w Congress of Racial Equality; and
Stokely Carmichael, new chair-
man of the Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee.
"We have made a national call
for people to come from all over
the United States," said King.
"This is the time for a great con-
4 frontation. The place, the issue
is squarely before the conscience
of the nation."
In Jackson, Gov. Paul Johnson
urged "the people of Mississippi
to ignore completely these exhibi-
tionists and stay away from this
march."
Meredith, a controversial figure
in Mississippi, said he started the
march on the theory that if he
could walk safely through the
state, Negroes who live in Mis-
sissippi could feel that they could
register to vote in safety.
"I shall return," Meredith
swore from his hospital bed yes-
terday as King pledged to make
his march through Mississippi
"bigger than Selma."
Audrey James Norvell, captured
minutes after the shooting, was
taken handcuffed yesterday before
a justice of the peace, who set
bond at $25,000 and ordered him
held for grand jury action. Norvell
waved a preliminary hearing after
saying he had hired two Hernando
lawyers.
Not Usual
DeSoto County Prosecutor Ross
Franks said "This is not the usual
case. It is not the usual assault
and battery with intent to kill. It
is a situation of national import-
ance."
Norvell's attorneys said their
next step would be to file a writ
of habeas corpus because they
feel the bond is excessive and
violates his rights.
Norvell ignored reporters' ques-
tions on the way to the hearing.
Dressed neatly and wearing sun-1
glasses, he raised his hands-
locked before him in steel bracelets
-to wipe his forehead with a
handkerchief.
The shots which felled Meredith
on a Mississippi highway brought
congressmen and civil rights lead-
ers to his bedside yesterday en
route to Mississippi on behalf of

voter registration.
Gregory Walks
Negro comedian Dick Gregory
retraced Meredith's trek backward
to Memphis yesterday, starting
south of the bloody spot where
Meredith was felled from ambush.
State and local police moved
along U.S. Highway 51 in front
and behind Gregory's group.
"If one shot from the bushes
can frighten a whole nation,"
Gregory said, "we're in trouble."
E El

Replaces Mc
trh Against

redith
Fear'

4>

Chances for
East-West
Talks End
Ministers to NATO
Take Stand Against
Conference Proposal
BRUSSELS (/)-Key ministers
of the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization, led by Secretary of
State Dean Rusk, yesterday brand-
ed as too hasty any NATO ini-
tiative now for an East-West con-
ference on European security.
They emphasized, however, that
cautious and continuing efforts
should be made to improve East-
West relations.
The attitude of the ministers,
meeting at NATO's spring con-
ference, torpedoed a Danish pro-
posal calling for a conference be-
tween the NATO and Warsaw
Pact nations. The latter are now
meeting in Moscow.
Common Interest
Rusk told the ministers that
the West shares a common inter-
est for peace with the Soviet Un-
ion, but cautioned that Allied sol-
idarity is the main ingredient.
The discussion on European se-
curity came about after the min-
isters became bogged down on
the status of French troops in
West Germany after France with-
draws its forces from the NATO
military command on July 1.
But in a rare note of harmony
between Washington and aPris,
French Foreign Minister Maurice
Couve de Murville echoed Rusk's
remarks. He said he agreed that
there should be "no hasty ap-
proach" to seeking lasting Euro-
pean security and added "every-
thing should be done with cau-
tion."
Individual Nations
Couve de Murville said the
problems of an East-West detente
was not a matter for the Warsaw
and North Atlantic pacts to deal
with, but instead it was the busi-
ness of individual European na-
tions.
He said that he himself was
aiding in this effort through a
continuing series of official visits
to East European nations, and
added that French President
Charles de Gaulle's trip to the
Soviet Union June 20 should be
seen in this context.
West German Foreign Minister
Gerhard Schroeder's views join-
ed those of Rusk and Couve de
Murville when he said "NATO as
an organization could not proper-
ly take up an active political role
toward the East bloc." He added
that "one should avoid giving the
Warsaw Pact more weight by rec-
ognizing it as a partner in nego-
tiations."
NATO, the German foreign min-
ister said, "should be used to pre-
pare and harmonize Western pol-
icy toward the East bloc."

SAIGON (M)-Buddhist opposi-
tion to the military regime rose
again ;esterday in the far north.
A general strike crippled Hue and
troops broke up a budding dem-
onstration in Da Nang with tear
gas grenades.
In Hue, United States military
advisers were threatened by both
Vietnamese troops and civilians
as they tried to drive through
the streets. Soldiers pointed their
guns at the Americans when they
tried to remove Buddhist altars
cluttering the streets. The Ameri-
cans turned back.
The next step in the Buddhist
campaign to bring down the mili-
tary regime of Premier Nguyen
Cao Ky may be announced to-
day, when the Buddhist Institute
holds a news conference.
Cold Shoulder
The Buddhist militants have
cold shouldered the regime's de-
cision to add 10 civilians, includ-
ing moderate Buddhists, to the
10-man military junta. They may
decide to take to the streets
again in the violent sort of dem-
onstration that plagued Saigon
and other cities last month.
Also expected today is an an-
nouncement by the Electoral Com-
mission, named by the military re-
gime to arrange for the election
Sept. 11 of a Constitutional As-
sembly to draft a constitution.
In the war, North Vietnamese
regulars came out of hiding and
attacked a military camp of the
U.S. 101st Airborne Division be-
fore dawn. The enemy was driven
off into the hills and jungles
about 260 miles north of Saigon
leaving 77 dead, a U.S. spokesman
reported.

were en route to fight the Com- demonstration. The troops routed
munists. the demonstrators'with tear gas.

Tri Quang instructed his fol-
lowers to remove their household
altars from the streets tempor-
arily today to allow the troops to
move through.
U.S. military advisers ran afoul
of the altars, however, when they
tried to drive through the crowd-
ed streets.
U.S. spokesmen said in three
incidents, South Vietnamese sol-
diers pointed their guns at Amer-
ican officers when they tried to
remove the altars from the paths
of their vehicles. The Vietnamese
troops were brought in last week
to put down dissident elements in
the city, but many are sympa-
thetic to the Buddhist militants.
At Da Nang, about 50 miles
southeast of Hue, Vietnamese
soldiers came up quickly when
about 10 monks and a group of
their followers tried to begin a

Games
As in Hue, the people of Da
Nang also brought out their
household altars into the streets.
There followed a game of put-
and-take.
The soldiers removed the altars
to the sidewalks. As soon as they
left, the people would come out
and put the altars in the streets
again, then run as the troops re-
turned.
About 100 household altars were
placed on the road leading from
the downtown section of Da Nang
to the U.S. airbase, but traffic
moved around them.
At the same time, most shops
in Da Nang closed, but it could
not be learned if an order for a
general strike had also been is-
sued for the city by the militant
Buddhists.

MORE DEMONSTRATIONS:
Protests Rise in Hue; Da Nang
Buddhists May Veto Ky Offer

World News Roundup

-Associated Press

AND OVER SHE GOES

By The Associated Press
SANTO DOMINGO - Presi-
dent-elect Joaquin Balaguer and
the defeated presidential candi-
date, Juan Bosch, met secretly
Monday night to discuss national
problems, an authoritative source
said yesterday.
The two-hour meeting was not
a private concession by Bosch of
his defeat in last Wednesday's
elections, the source stressed, al-
thmioh tho rmlb:wr dir scussed

Student demonstrators overturn a government public works truck in Panama City, Panama, during
eight hours of rioting protesting the unsolved killing of a leftist-student leader.
Meredith Shooting May Speed
Work on New Civil Rights Bl

WASHINGTON UP)-Some gov-
ernment officials said yesterday
they believe the shooting of James
H. Meredith will help spur action
on the administration's new civil
rights bill this year.
Atty. Gen. Nicholas Katzenbach
told a Senate hearing that enact-
ment of the measure is "absolute-
ly essential" to deal with such
acts of violence.
Separate Action
A move developed in the House
to try for separate, expedited ac-
tion on one part of the bill that
would make it a federal crime to
interfere forcibly with anyone en-
gaged in the exercise of his con-
stitutional rights.
Katzenbach told newsmen that
if this section were low now, Mer-
edith's assailant would be subject
to a possible maximum penalty of
10 years imprisonment and a $10,-
000 fine.
Vice-President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey and House Speaker John W.
McCormack (D-Mass) expressed
belief at separate news conferences
that the Meredith shooting would
add impetus to civil rights legis-
lation this year.
McCormack said there is no
question that the Meredith inci-
dent "will have a good effect on
the passage of additional effective
civil rights legislation."
It surely should and I think it
will," Humphrey said, adding that
this is particularly true of the
section that would provide protec-
tion for civil rights workers.
Constitutkonality
Sen. Sam J. Ervin, Jr. (D-NC)
questioned the constitutionality of
this section at the Senate hear-
ings. He said he would seek to

achieve the same result through
a constitutional amendment.
Katzenbach, testifying before
Ervin's Judiciary subcommittee,
said he is confident of the legis-
lation's constitutionality, but at
the same time he said he was de-
lighted that Ervin feels it is nec-
essary for Congress to legislate in
this field.
"I also feel that Congress should
preserve the Constitution," Ervin
said.
Hates Violencej
Ervin said he abhors violence
or threats against anyone, but he
contended the 14th Amendment
reaches only state and local offi-
cials and does not permit Congress
to make the acts of private in-
dividuals punishable as crimes.
The 14th Amendment forbids
any state to deny any citizen
equal protection of the laws.
In the House, Rep. Charles Mc.
Mathias, Jr. (R-Md) said separ-

ciary Committee now considering
the administration bill. Celler in-
dicated he would resist any at-
tempt to fragment the measure
at this time.
Javits Speaks
Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY)
told the Senate the civil rights
bill before the Senate Judiciary
Committee would "zero in on such
a situation as occurred" in the
Meredith shooting. Javits said the
Mississippi incident means that
"this bill should be passed with
all speed."
One factor in such incident,
Javits said, might well be a feel-
ing on the part of an assailant
that he is immune from conviction
"because of racial hatred" in the
locality.
A section in the bill providing
for nondiscrimination in jury se-
lection should help end any such
feelings of security, he said.

First Contact tnougnILLe rsursL wreh) VY eL
This was the first contact with Balaguer won the presidential
North Vietnamese in Operation contest with a margin of nearly
Hawthorne, designed to search a quarter-million votes. The offi-
and destroy enemy forces coming cial results have not been released
down the Ho Chi Minh trail from and Bosch has not conceded pub-
Laos. licly. His party is seeking to es-
In the air war, Air Force and tablish proof of vote irregulari-
Navy planes again pounded tar- ties in order to challenge some of
gets in North Viet Nam but on a the 'results.
reduced scale because of clouds.
Air Force, Marine and Navy planes The two men also talked about
struck in force at enemy positions possible collaboration of Bosch
in South Viet Nam. and his Dominican Revolution-
In Hue, 400 miles northeast of ary party-PRD--in the Balaguer
Saigon, the general strike paralyz- y Invi td hBal guer has publi
ed the market area but some shops help.
and government offices remained help*
open elsewhere.
Altars in Streets DETROIT-Approximately 800
Householders in Hue moved teachers in nearby Wayne struck
their altars into the streets at yesterday in support of demands
the urging of their militant Bud- for higher salaries and benefits,
dhist leader, Thich Tri Quang, joining striking colleagues in two
to show the city was Buddhist. other crippled suburban school dis-
Tri Quang had charged that tricts.
Vietnamese troops were coming Donald Louis, president of the
to attack the pagodas. Three bat- Wayne Education Association, said
talions of government troops ar- the strike was called after nego-
rived outside the Buddhist strong- tiations with the Wayne Commu-
hold, but their officers said they nity School District failed to pro-

duce a contract settlement Mon-
day.
DEARBORN -- Ford Motor Co.
announced today that five of its
17 U.S. assembly plants began
four-day work weeks this week to
balance inventories as the 1966
model year runs out.
A Ford spokesman said the
four-day work is likely to con-
tinue until the end of the model
year.
* * *
DURBAN, South Africa - Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy debated yes-
terday with South African stu-
dents defending their country's
policy of apartheid, or racial seg-
regation.
Later, he made plans to visit
today with Chief Albert Luthuli,
the African Nobel Prize winner
banned under the country's anti-
Communism laws.
The visiting U.S. senator carried
to Stellenbosch University his
views that the students should
meet what he considered'their ob-
ligation to all who needed help,
regardless of nationality or the
color of their skin.
He spoke at a luncheon at a
men's residence at the university,
regarded as a citadel of South
Africa's apartheid policies. It is
the alma mater of Premier Hend-
rik F. Verwoerd and other nation-
alist leaders.

Now

ate action is needed to speed
passage of legislation that would Senate Republican Leader
protect Negroes exercising their ett M. Dirksen of Illinois t
rights, news conference the attac
Mathias said he expects other Meredith was "a ghastly
Republicans will support his move ness" likely to "create a
to obtain separate passage of this deal of mean sentiment."
part of the administration bill, "I'm afraid it's going to
which faces a long and bitter fight the wells of mischief all
over open housing. again," he said.

Ever-
old a
ck, on
busi-
great
open
over

Mathias' proposal drew opposi- He said he couldn't speculate,
tion from Rep. Emanuel Celler however, whether it will spur pass-
(D-NY), chairman of the Judi- age of the administration's bill.
ENDS DIAL
TONIGHT 2-6264
Produced by .SAM JAFFE and PAUL RADIO
PANIS104- COLUMBIACLOR
-,THURSDAY
THEY STUNNED THE WORLD WITH THEIR INCREDIBLE VICTORY!
SHADOW",
n, KIRK DOUGLAS
SEHTA BERGER
Guest appearances: Frank Sinatra, YuI Bruner, John Wayne

DIAL 5-6290
Now
Tom
and
IRMa

qL

I

I

I DID!
DID YOU?

I

One of the greatest works in the dramatic literature of western civilizationTHE ORESTEIA
gave tragedy its vocabulary of values. A chilling trilogy of plays of mounting hor-
ror and fascination, it introduces the theatre's greatest tragic heroine-Clytemnestra.
JUDITH ANDERSON
IN AESCHYLUS'
THE ORESTEIA
TRANSLATED BY RICHMOND LATTIMORE
ALEXIS SOLOMOS ArtisticDirector R

DIAL
8-6416

Aristophanes' timeless comic masterpiece is a delightful, satiric romp through man-
nered Athens. THE BIRDS' extravagant plot and circumstance, outrageous clowning,
and spectacular fantasy make contemporary comment in side-splitting style.

PH. 483-4680
ent weO-.CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
So wn at 10:30 Only
A It'f'

I

.are side by side'.
aeK WNNER
PICTURE
BILLY WLDE'"RICHARDSON'S

4 RA JT(
"RAILROAD MAN"
*@" STARTS THURSDAY 00

ENDS
ON IGHT

BERT LAHR
IN ARISTOPHANES'
THE BIRDS
TRANSLATED BY WILLIAM ARROWSMITH
ICHARD KIRSCHNER ExecutiveDirector

PEOPLE WHO LAUGH...
(at people cutting:
buttons off/people.. .
WON'T BLUSH!...
(at"words that are
still startling!...
-NY Times)

Also Starring
DONALD DAVIS
. LLOYD HARRIS

JACQUELINE BROOKES

JOHN MICHAEL KING

JACK FLETCHER

FREDERIC WARRINER DINA PAISNER KAREN LUDWIG RUTH VOLNER
RU BY DEE

Scenery and Festival Stage Designed by ELDON ELDER Lighting by GILBERT V. HEMSLEY, JR. Costumes for The Orestela by MR. SOLOMOS
Costumes for The Birds by MR. ELDER Choreography for The Oresteia by HELEN McGEHEE Choreography for The Birds by GEMZE DE LAPPE
Music for The Oresteia by IANNIS XENAKIS Music for The Birds by HERMAN CHESSID
Entire Production conceived and Directed by ALEXIS SOLO MOS
-- -- m -

1 11

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