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June 01, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-06-01

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C. H: V.

J

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1966 ThiHE MICHIGAN DAILY

-.. ..-

ratAE 3IEdrl

Buddhists

Meet
North

with

Iy,

PROVOCATIVE ACTIONS' CITED:
Brezhnev- Warns U.S. Not To
Further Aggressions in Cuba

Raid
Civil Crisis
Facing New
Negotiations
Buddhists Continue
Suicides , Reiterate
Political Demands
SAIGON OP)-Buddhist envoys
met unexpectedly yesterday with
leaders of the military junta they
sought to overthrow and U.S. of-
ficials said this was a hopeful sign
that might lead to a negotiated
solution of the crisis.
It was the first formal meeting
between the Buddhists and the
junta, whose feud has brought
South Viet Nam to the brink of
civil war. Spokesmen for both
sides indicated the session may be
the first of a series aimed at a
possible compromise.
Participating in the meeting at
the Gia Long Palace where Lt.
Gen. Bguyen Van Thieu, chief of
state, Premier Nguyen Cao Ky and
four leading monks of the Bud-
dhist Institute headed by the
Thich Tam Chau.
Five Suicides
The meeting followed five sui-
cides by fire by Buddhists since
}4 Sunday. The latest came early
yesterday at Hue, where a woman
burned herself to death in that
northern citadel of opposition to
the government.
The deaths were aimed at elec-
trifying public opinion and putting
pressure on the United States to
disavow the military regime.
The American attitude has re-
mained unchanged, however. The
U.S. mission in Saigon deplored
the self immolations but America's
support for the regime in power
continued.
The Buddhists demand that the
JL military government turn over its
power to a civilian body that would
head the nation in the interim
period before general elections,
set tentatively for Sept. 11.
Violence and Nonviolence
Meanwhile the contradiction be-
tween nonviolence and human
torches, so evident to Westerners,
appears wholly irrelevant to the
saffron-robed monks.
Seated awkwardly on a Western-
style straight chair, Chau will say:
"We will continue the struggle in
the spirit of nonviolence of
Buddhism."
It took seven such fiery immola-
tions in 1963 to undermine the
regime of Roman Catholic Presi-
dent Ngo Dinh Diem. Now the
monks are equally determined to
bring down Buddhist Premier
Nguyen Cao Ky.
Earlier yesterday, the Buddhist
organization asked its followers to
stop the suicides. But Chau warn-
ed that more deaths will follow
unless the government agrees to
Buddhist demands.
Buddhist dissidence in the north
appeared to be diminishing. Only
the former imperial capital of Hue
has continued open defiance of
the regime with its armed "sui-
cide squads."
The local province chief at Hue
told the dissidents to lay down
their arms and surrender the radio
station.
Antigovernment students aban-
doned the radio building yester-
day but a student spokesman said
this did not mean the rebel group
would not resume broadcasting
Wednesday. Nor did the students
give up their arms.

With its northern bastion
dwindling, the Buddhists may
have been forced to meet with the
regime.
At this stage, the government is
moving with extreme caution, ob-
viously feeling that the slightest
mistake could again send, crowds
into the streets and endanger its
power.
There were unconfirmed reports
that some members of the gov-
ernment were considering asking
Ky to resign to pacify the
Buddhists.
Some American officials felt the
Buddhists may accept less than
the recignation of Ky and Thieu.
They claimed the government's
recent firm stand in the face of
Buddhist dissidence in the north
has considerably shaken up
Buddhist leadership.
"There is a great deal of per-
plexity among Buddhist leaders,"
one American official said.
Press Attacks U.S.
The Buddhist press continued its
attacks on the U.S. government
and its backing of the military re-
gime.

On

Increase

I --Associated Press
Buddhist nun sits amid flames in Hue, South Viet Nam. Her self immolation occurred early Sunday
at Dieu De Pagoda.
SECOND IN 40 YEARS:
Dominicans To Hold Elections

U.. HBombs
Soviet-Built
Missile Sites
Heaviest Raids Since
Bombing Lull Ended
Late Last January
SAIGON -U.S. planes rained
bombs on Soviet-built missile sites
and communications Monday in
the heaviest raids on North Viet
Nam since a bombing lull ended
Jan. 31, a U.S. military spokes-
man said yesterday.
The raids ranged from the fron-
tier of South Viet Nam to north
of Hanoi, the North Vietnamese
capital.
Clearing skies unleashed the
planes for raids on antiaircraft in-
stallations, trains, bridges and
supply lines. A break in the mon-
soon rains in South Viet Nam per-
mitted 280 air sorties against
enemy positions. B52 bombers from
Guam smashed at a suspected
Viet Cong base inland from Quang
Ngai, 330 miles northeast of Sai-
gon.
Red China's radio claimed four
U.S. planes were shot down over
North Viet Nam in the past two
days, but there was no confirma-
tion. The Peking broadcast said
three were shot down Monday and
one yesterday, indicating that the
raids were continuing without
letup.
Sporadic Resistance Aground
Aground, American, Australian,
Korean and Vietnamese soldiers
jabbed into Viet Cong sectors with
only sporadic resistance from elu-
sive Communist forces.
A military spokesman reported
that continuing thrusts from five
major operationstyesterday failed
to meet significant resistance. The
North Vietnamese regular and Viet
Cong Communists in South Viet
Nam were evidently conserving
their forces-awaiting perhaps the
heavy monsoon rains that are now
beginning.
The five big sweeps are:
-Operation Paul Revere west of
Pleiku in the central highlands.
--Operation Crazy Horse in
Binh Dinh Province, 70 miles
northeast of Saigon.
-Operation Fillmore in Phu
Yen Province about 275 miles
northeast of Saigon.
-Operation Lexington in the
flatlands near Bien Hoa about 25
miles from Saigon.
-Operation Hardihood in the
delta province of Phuoc Tuy
southeast of Saigon.

PRAGUE ('P)-Leonid I. Brezh-
nev, chief of the Soviet Commun-
ist party, charged the United
States yesterday with "provoca-
tive actions" against Cuba in in-
cidents around the U.S. naval
base at Guantanamo Bay.
He said Cuba has the firm sup-
port of the., Soviet Union and
warned the United States of
'serious consequences."
"Throughout the world these
provocations are creating protests
and indignation," he told a
Czechoslovak Communist party
congress at its opening session.
At the same time, a band of 30
students, identified as foreigners
studying in Poland, attacked the
U.S. Embassy in Warsaw with
bricks, ink bottles, and potatoes.
They were protesting U.S. policies
toward Cuba and Viet Nam.
Charges from Viet Nam
From North Viet Nam came a
charge that "recent acts of provo-
cation in Guantanamo has fur-
ther laid bare a U.S. aggressive
and bellicose nature."
Brezhnev's speech quoted him:

"A new proof of the aggressiveness
of imperialism is the provocative
actions of American military cir-
cles in Cuba in the region of the
U.S. military base of Guantanamo.
Throughout the world these pro-
vocations are creating protests
and indignation.
"These provocations threaten
serious consequences also for those
who are unleashing them. Our
Cuban brothers can be assured
that the Soviet Union will firmly
support revolutionary Cuba.
"Together with the other So-
cialist countries, the Soviet people
are taking a decisive stand against'
any attempts by the American im-
perialists to unleash a new mili-
tary conflagration and aggression."
Accusations by Castro
The government of Prime Min-
ister Fidel Castro in Cuba has
charged that American soldiers at
Guantanamo shot and fatally
wounded a Cuban sentry on duty
outside the base. The United
States says the soldier had entered
the base and was wounded after.
being given several warnings.

Washington also claims that
after that incident six Cubans
entered the base and exchanged
fire with U.S. Marines. Cuba has
denied that.
More recently, the Castro gov-
ernment claimed a Cuban exile
boat was sent from the Florida
Keys by agents of the U.S. Central
Intelligence Agency in a plot to
assassinate Castro.
After the Guantanamo incide:t
May 21, Castro ordered his arme.
forces and his people onto a state
of alert because of what he called
war threats from Washington.
U.S. Embassy Attacked
In Warsaw, U.S. Embassy of-
ficials said students attacking the
embassy in a 15-minute demon-
stration appeared to be mainly
Cubans, Africans and others study-
ing in Poland. They said damage
to windows, a glass display case
and an emgbassy automobile would
run to around several hundred
dollars.
Some Poles in the area chided
the students for their attack on
the embassy. The Polish Foreign
Ministry telephoned its regrets to
the embassy, a U.S. spokesman
said. The $2-mllion builing was
completed 21/2 years ago.
In his speech to the Czech as-
sembly, Brezhnev also assailed U.S.
piolicies $in Viet Nam. He said the
war there demanded unity in the
Communist world.
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong
representatives from among the
50 foreign Communist parties
present were given a warm wel-
come by the delegates. Communist
China, Albania and North Korea
-Peking's allies in the feud with
the Soviet Union-were invited but
did not show up.

World News Roundup,

l
l
C
i
-

SANTO DOMINGO (IP)-In their
second free election in more than
40 years, Dominicans will elect a
president today in the hope he
can give them a government cap-
able of solving their political ills
and putting the nation on the
road to economic salvation.
On the eve of the balloting,
Hector Garcia-Godoy, the provi-
sioned president, said that because
of the election, efforts are under
way to remove the inter-American
peace force before the new gov-
ernment is installed July 1.
"There will be no trouble if
the troops leave," he told a news
conference, "because the Domini-
can people are ready to prove to
the world they can handle their
own affairs."
The major rivals for the five-

year term are Juan Bosch of the
Dominican Revolutionary Party
(PRD) and Joaquin Balaguer of
the Reform Party (PR). The third
candidate is Rafael F. Bonnelly
of the Movement of National In-
tegration (MIN), a coalition of
small parties expected to trail the
chief candidates.
-Bosch was elected president in
December, 1962, in the first free
elections since the U.S. Marines
left this island nation in 1924. He
was overthrown in September,
1963. He has been charged with

behind him mainly because they
have no other alternative. They
represent about 15,000 votes.
Balaguer returned to this coun-
try in June of last year after three
years in political exile. He be-
came president in 1961 after Gen.
Rafael Trujillo, the dictator, was
assassinated. He served as vice
president under Trujillo. Among
his supporters are men who work-
ed under the Trujillo regime.
Bonneily became president of the
ruling Council of State when Bala-

By The Associated Press
LEOPOLDVILLE -- A military
court yesterday condemned to
death ex-Premier Evariste Kimba
and three former Cabinet mem-
bers accused of plotting to kill
President Joseph Mobuto. The
trial lasted but 90 minutes.
The government announced that
a Belgian diplomat had also been
ordered expelled for becoming in-
volved in the plot. The announce-
ment said the plotters contacted
the U.S. West German and French
embassies, but all refused to help
them.
WASHINGTON - Raising com-
plaints that the White House con-
ference on civil rights is "rigged,"
the Congress of Racial Equality
said yesterday it has decided to
participate and try to change the
rules.
Floyd B. McKissick, national
director of the civil rights group-
one of the "big six" such organi-
zations-told a news conference:
"We have decided after delibera-
tion to participate in order that
the militant can bring forth ideas
which otherwise would not be
brought forth."
WASHINGTON - The exten-
sion of universal public education

to all four- and five-year-olds,
with broad federal support, was
advocated yesterday by a leading
education commission.
"If such education were univer-
salized, most children would reach
six years of age with a level of
development strikingly different
from that which they bring to
school today," said the Education-
al Policies Commission.

being anti-United States and soft guer was overthrown in January
on communism. of 1962. Bonnelly describes him-
Bonch wm sm..ndlidself as a conservative. Among his
Bosch was a landslide winner in supporters are right-wingers who
1962. He got 58.7 per cent of the helped remove Bosch from power.
1,054,944 votes cast.
Although Bosch rejected their Until the elections are behind
support, left-wing extremists are them, Dominicans cannot be sure

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech)-
OPENING TONIGHT
AIMS L . ANCE
By GEORGE BERNARD SHAW
PERFORMANCES THROUGH SATURDAY AT 8:00 P.M.
in the air-conditioned Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office Opens Daily at 12:30 p.m.
(Season tickets still available at box office)

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity or Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1
Day Calendar
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production - George Bernard Shaw's
"MisalIlance": Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Counseling for the Dearborn Campus:
Will continue to be available in Room
2503 Administration Bldg. during the
first half of the Spring-summer Term
(May-June). Freshman and sophomore
students interested in a senior college
internship program in business ad-
ministration, senior college liberal arts
program and teacher certification may
call 764-0301 for an appointment with
a counselor.
Doctoral Examination for Lawrence
B. Mohr, Political Science; thesis:
"Determinants of Innovation in Orga-
nization," Wed., June i, 4609 Haven
Hall, at 9 a.m. Chairman, R. S. Fried-
man.
Student Government Council Approval
of the follrwing student-sponsored
events becames effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011" of the SAB.
Campus Young Socialist Alliance, Me-
morial for Leo Bernard, May 31, 8
p.m., Room 3B, Michigan Union.

Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign vlsi.
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center. 764-2148.
Dr. Saad Gautalla, Ford Foundation
fellow from Egypt, May 31- June 24,
Dr. (Mrs.) Phalgluni Bhattacharyya,
director of health services, Barrackpore,
West Bengal. India, May 30-June 23.
Dr. Gurdial Singh Chhina, deputy
director, Public Health Services, Chan-
digarh, Punjab, India, May 30-June 23.
~Dr. Nagibbal Rajgor, director of
health medical services, Junafiadh, Guj-
rot, India, May 30-June 23.
Alexander Hatejko, Poland, June 1-
July 31.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF TMIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENVS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
M * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw: Midweek devotion, June 1,
at 10 p.m. Message by the Rev. A.
Schelps, "A Wise Man's Prayer."

that elections are going to be held
successfully at all. But that is
only the first hurdle.
The chances are that hurdle
will be taken. The next will be
acceptance of the result. If the
vote today is close-and that
seems likely-there is a go~od
chance for trouble from support-
ers of the man who is declared the
loser.
If that hurdle is taken, there
are still others. Any president
declared elected must be success-
fully inaugurated. Then he must
remain in office.
Should Balaguer win by a tight
margin, there could be an ex-
plosion in the streets sparked by
leftists. Should Bosch win by a
close margin, the reaction might
be more slow, but he could be in
danger from rightwing elements
in the armed forces.
About one million Dominicans
are expected to vote. Unofficial
result may not be known until
tomorrow if the election is close.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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FND T__CH

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Thursday
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LAST 2 DAYS
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Ending Tonight
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direction and performance!
N. V. Herald-Tribune

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State and Liberty

Open 9:30 to 5:30

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for information call
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at Travel Bureaus or
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"MARVELOUS! AN
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-The New Yorker
PLUS
"STRING
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in Color

AI~U~~u1~A CIN E MA V
PRESENTATI ON
Thursday
"LUCK OF GINGER COFFEY"
and "BEBO'S GIRL"

11

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At 1:30
4 (Feature at 1:45)
At 7:30
(Feature at 7:45) E
FRIDAY---
TWO SENSATIONS RETURN
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PH. 483-4680
The area's newest Drive-in is
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