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May 30, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG~ANWDAIY

tigators Probe
ie Station Blasts

TOWER DEFEATS BLAKLEY:
Texas GOP Takes First State Race

T LAKE CITY () - Flocks
estigators yesterday expand-
eir manhunt as the tense
relaxed a bit in. the wake of
dynamitinks that knocked"
ephone microwave and cable
stations.
dawn blasts Sunday at un-
led and isolated sites in east-
evada and western Utah pro-
a rash of war nerves across
ation.
False Reports
ried citizens plagued news
oilce switchboards with re-
=-ll false-that dams had
knocked out; that aerial
ngs had occurred across the
ry; that Anierica's communi-
s system was destroyed.
the question of whether the
nitings were the work of
urs, vandals or someone bent
ad revenge mattered not to
of Federal Bureau of Inves-
on agents, police and military
rities hunting those respon-
blasts all along U.S. high-
1-50A, shattered two micro-
relay towers near Wendover,
and Cedar Mountain in west-
ral Utah. The blasts occurred
en 4:55 and 6:45 a.m. The
ins are part of the nation--
telephone system.
Troops Summoned
Ronal Guard troops were call-
t in Idaho, Nevada, Colorado

and other states to search for
bombs and to guard similar relay
stations. Some of the guardsmen
were relived later by 'civilians.
FBI agents pouring into the
area had nothing to say about the
aims or methods of their investi-
gation. They sifted through debris
at the blast sites. Dynamite wrap-
ped in military olive drab material
was found at one station.
Mountain States T&T moved in
mobile equipment to fill the gap
in the microwave system. Damage
was estimated at $850,000.

By Th Associated Press
DALLAS -. Victorious college
professor John G. Tower last
weekend became the first Re-
publican ever to win a statewide
office in a Texas popular election.
The victory of Tower, a conser-
vative, left gleeful GOP workers
glad that they had rung so many
doorbells, while the Democrats
were wondering what went wrong.
Tower won Saturday's special
United States Senate runoff elec-
tion by 8,000 over incumbent Sen.
William A. Blakley, a Democrat
who holds the seat on interim ap-
pointment.

Weste
Depend on Truce in Laos

GENEVA (P) - The Western'
powers prodded the Soviet Union
yesterday on the extreme urgency
of gaining an effective cease fire
in Laos to prevent collapse of the
14-nation conference here on that
Southeast Asian nation's future.
Informants said one object of
this exercise was to show the
Kremlin there is a limit to West-
ern patience.
In Geneva and Moscow British
diplomats repeatedly asserted pres-
ent truce arrangements in Laos.

appear to be falling apart. They
urged the Soviet Union to join
the British government In dis-
patching firmer directions to the
international control commission
trying to keep the peace in Laos.
The British failed to budge the
Russians; Instead the Soviet side
insisted present cease fire ar-
rangements are adequate and that
the international conference here
should get down to considering
Russia's veto-based proposals for
settling the Laotian problem.
The deadlock between Britain's
Malcolm MacDonald and Soviet
Deputy Foreign Minister; Georghi
Pushkin showed, itself in the
failure of the international con-
ference itself to meet yesterday
after a four-day recess.

Tower had 444,815 votes, ort
50.45 per cent of the 881,630 votes,<
to Blakley's 436,815. Approximately
7,600 votes--not enough to changei
World News
Roundup*
By The Associated Press
LONDON - The United States,
Navy was reported yesterday to
have asked the British government
for extra security measures to
protect its Polaris submarine base
in Scotland's Holy Loch against
harassment by pacifist demon-
strators.
. * *
DETROIT - Secretary of Labor
Arthur Goldberg said yesterday
the Kennedy administration does'
not intend to "intervene or inter-
fere" in upcoming auto wage nego-
tiations, but he added that a
strike within the industry would be
"intolerable."
TALLAHASSEE -- A bill re-
quiring Florida high schools to
teach a course in "Americanism
versus Communism" became a law
yesterday with Gov. Farris Bry-
ant's signature.
VIENNA - Austria's Univer-
sity students 'started a weeklong
strige yesterday in protest against
a reduction of the education bud-
get and high school students joined
the walkout.
WELCH, W. Va. - This de-
pressed coal-mining area yester-
day became the first testing
ground for a Kennedy administra-
tion plan to take the nation's
needy off food handouts and send
them to grocery stores for better
diets.
LEOPOLDVILLE - President
Moise Tshombe of Katanga, who
has been held prisoner by the Cen-
tral Congolese government for a
month, was brought to Leopold-
ville by riverboat yesterday pre-
sumably to be tried for treason.
MIAMI - As a new wave of
sabotage reportedly hit Cuba over
the weekend anti-Castro plotting
in Miami continued-but without
coordination. Havana broadcasts,
heard at Key West, threatened
swift retribution for the saboteurs.
Sunday 26 children and 14 adults
were burned in a Pinar del Rio
theater after a phosphorous bomb
was hurled into the auditorium.
. . .

the outcome-remained to be
counted.
Tower says that he is the same
type of conservative as Sen. Barry
M. Goldwater (R-Ariz) who, along
with GOP National Chairman Sen.
Thruston B. Morton (R-Kty) and
former President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower campaigned for him.
The Kennedy administration, in
Tower's view, is committed to
"creeping socialism and shows a
lack of confidence in the people
to make their own desicions.
'Put on Brakes'
"Congress's biggest job is to
put the brakes on these purported
liberal schemes which can debase
our currency and undermine our
rights," he says.
Tower describes himself as a
moderate in civil rights. He ad-
vocates "fiscal responsibility" and
is opposed todeficit government
spending, federal control in sub-
sidies, medical aid for the aged,
an increase in minimum wages;
and federal aid to education.
Second Race
This race was his second for the
seat. Last November he ran
against Vice-President Lyndon B.
Johnson, who won and later va-
cated the seat to take his place
in the administration.
Congressional Republicans, ju-
bilant over the result, claimed that
the victory was the beginning of
a trend in the South\
However, Democrats on Capitol
Hill said that it only goes to show
what happens to Democrats who
desert the concepts of President
John F. Kennedy.
BothTower and Blakley have
been described as "conservative."

Supreme Court Back
'Ble Laws; Religiouu

Jews See Adverse
Effect on Sabbath
WASHINGTON (P) - Sunday
Blue Laws won a sweeping victory
in the Supreme Court yesterday.
The Court handed down four
separate rulings upholding con-
stitutionality of Maryland, Massa-
chusetts and Pennsylvania laws
restricting business activity on
Sunday.
In two of the cases-one of two
from Pennsylvania and one from
Massachusetts - the chief issue
was whether the Blue Laws inter-
ferred with the free exercise of
religion by Orthodox Jews who
observe their Sabbath on Satur-
day.
Warren Speaks
Chief Justice' Earl Warren said
he did not. find the statutes' pur-
pose or effect is religious. Warren
wrote that Blue Laws may result
in financial sacrifice by those who
observe their Sabbath on days
other than Sunday, but said this
"is wholly different than when
the legislation attempts to make
a religious practice itself unlaw-
ful"
Rabbi Phillip Hiat, executive
director of the Synagogue Council
See HIGH, Page 6

PARIS (A) - Two French gen-
erals, stripped of their rank and
their uniforms, faced a military
court yesterday on treason charges
stemming from last month's un-
successful military revolt in Al-
giers.
One strongly defended himself,
the other collapsed and was un-
able to speak in his own behalf.
Former Gens. Maurice Challe
and Andre Zeller could be sentenc-
ed to death for their role in the
army's defiance of President Char-
les de Gaulle's proposals for the
future of Algeria. They should
know their fate by Wednesday
night.
Under French law they were not

required to enter a plea. The fact
charged against them are hard
in dispute. Their defense was th
their motives were right-to ke
Algeria part of France.
Challe, who formerly comman
ed in Algeria and then served
the head of the Atlantic Allian
Central Europe Command, sat b
tween guards with Zeller, form
army chief of staff. Both we
dark civilian suits.
Challe, a southern FrenchhE
argued his case with consideral
skill. He spoke hoarsely, in d
military tones, avoiding any dr
matic display. He said only
handful of officers opposed t
coup.

Four Rulings'
Uphold State
Litigations

ALGERIAN CRISIS:
French Generals Face,
Military Court Martial.

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A carefully worded announce-
ment said the recess would con-
tinue a day or two longer.
MacDonald and Pushkin-the
conference chairmen-met for al-
most four hours. Their private dis-
cussion failed to produce agree-
ment on the work the conference
should undertake next. According
to one account, the British dele-
gation leader "spoke plainly" to
Pushkin.
The Indiana - Canadian - Polish
control commission on Laos has
filed two requests with the chair-
men and still is awaiting answers
on both.

PIPE CENTER

1217 So. University Ave.

Ph. NO 3-6236

Latin America,
Tour Planned
By Stevenson
WASHINGTON (P) - President
John F. Kennedy is sending United
Nations Ambassador Adlai E.
Stevenson on a mission to South
America to seek to perfect and
accelerate the Inter - American
Council Program for Social and
Econofic Development.
Announcing the special mission
Sunday, Kennedy said he felt sure
Stevenson's journey will contrib-
ute immeasurably to preparations
for the mid-July meeting of the
council in Uruguay.
Stevenson told reporters he in-
tended to visit all 10 South Ameri-
can capitals prior to the confer-
ence to formally launch Kennedy's
"Alliance for Progress" program.
Cite Eichmann
Truck .Barter

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NICE - Prince Boun"Oum, pre-
mier of the pro-Wesern Laos gov-
ernment, has suggested a three-
power Laotian summit meeting
with neutral and pro-Communist
factulons somewhere in France, it
was disclosed yesterday.Prince
Norodom Shianouk, chief of
state of Cambodia, made the an-
nouncement after two days of
talks with Prince Boum Oum.
LISBON-The interior ministry
last night disclosed the arrest of
three political opponent of'Pre-
mier Antonio Salu*ar's regime for
urging drastic changes in the con-
stitution to bring about what they
called a more Democratic rule.

1210 S. University

4 TV CENTER
304 S. Thayer NO 5-4855

NO 3-6922

JERUSALEM (A) - A fiery, red-
haired Zionist rescue worker yes-
terday identified Adolf Eichmann
as the Nazi officer who offered
to barter a million Jews for 10,000
trucks for use against the Soviet
army in World War II.
Joel Brand, a wartime Jewish
leader in Budapest and now a
resident of Israel, said he per-
sonally negotiated with Eichman
in an abortive attempt to spare
Hungary's Jews 'from death in
Nazi gas chambers.

1961 ANN ARBOR DRAMA SEASON
OPENING TONIGHT
. The Drama Event of the Yearl
ALBERT DEKKER

Presented by THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
1961-62 Season
CHORAL UNION SERIES
GEORGE LONDON, Bass .... ................... .W .Wed, Oct. 4
THE ROGER WAGNER CHORALE ............... .Thurs., Oct. 19
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .. ......... . .2:30 Sun., Oct. 22
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA.............. . . .Fri., Nov. 3
HERBERT VON KARAJAN, Conductor
BAYANIHAN (Philippine Songs and Dances) ... ...Mon., Nov. 6
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist .. . . . ......... 2:30, Sun., Nov. 12
GALINAVISHNEVSKAYA, Soprano ............. ..Tues., Nov. 21
EMIL GILELS, Pianist .......... ............ ..Tues., Feb. 13
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . ...... .2:30, Sun., Mar. 4
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE .............. .... Sat., March.24
Season Tickets: $20.00-$17.00-$15.00-$12.00-$10.00
EXTRA SERIES
MAZOwSZE (Polish Songs and Dances) .......... Tues., Oct. 24
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA ....... .........Thurs., Nov. 16
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist ......................Mon., Nov. 27
BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCHESTRA ........ .. ..2:30, Sun., Feb. 18
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor
LEONTYNE PRICE, Soprano . ...... .... ................Mon., Mar. 12

9 p

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