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May 24, 1961 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-24

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PAGE SC THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1961

MAN tit 1itkito
by MIKE GILLMAN
Coming to a Rest
OU SIT DOWN at a typewriter and for the first time, you're at -a
loss for words. How do you write a final column? It's a tradition
that Daily senior sports editors conclude their careers with a last
column.
But where do you start?
How do you sum up three or four years of writing sports into a
neat little pact age? Looking at it from a distant perspective, it's even
hard to see why you did it-and you ask yourself questions:
DOES IT really matter that one person can run over a given distance,
one-tenth of a second faster than anyone else? And how can you
explain 100,000 people rising from their seats with cheers when one
blue-clad youth on a distant field throws an inflated piece of leather;
to another blue-clad youth 40 yards away?
And in something called a "World Series," one person hitting a
little round ball over a distant fence can decide which team leaves
the field as "World Champions" while the other team is an also-ran.
Why?
Why do they give a big trophy to a group of men who can hit
a flat, hard piece of rubber into a net more times in a 60-minute period
than any other team?
Or swim faster . . . or jump higher . . . or drop a ball into a
hoop more often . .. or . ..?
You ask yourself these questions and can't really decide on an-
swers Can't really decide on answers that is-until you've leaned on
that typewriter for an hour or so.
HEN the answer hits you.
You've been writing about people. And you've been writing about
people who have tried. Then you know that what has made the
difference between the people and teams you've written about hasn't
been just that one-tenth of a second or that one extra time a puck
slipped past a goalie. The difference has been in the effort, the prac-
tice, the pain that has gone into producing that extra split-second
or goal.
When you start to realize what these efforts represent, then the
whole idea of athletics becomes more meaningful. The concept of the
Battle of Waterloo being won on English cricket fields becomes
pertinent.
A ND THERE IS politics in athletics. Perhaps it is a conflict between
Big Ten athletic directors and faculty representatives . . . or a
personality clash between coach and player. Whatever it may be, it's
a miniature of the human interactions that in another setting decides
whether laws are passed or repealed . .. whether University appropria-
tions are raised or maintained . . . or whether we have war or peace.
This is the essence-this is why you write sports.
You've seen work.
You've seen sweat.
You've seen fear.
You've seen rivalry.
You've seen emotion.
And finally, you've seen conflict.

Freehan Hurt as 'M' Nine Bows, 7-5

C

(Continued from Page 1)
a lead they never relinquished.
Two more runs crossed the plate
in the third on a single, a double,
and a third strike that Freehan.
dropped which permitted Ihne to
reach base safely. A sacrifice by
Michalski brought in the fourth
tally.
Meanwhile, the Wolverines were
battering away at Western starter
Ken Larsen who weathered the
storm or at least escaped with
minimal danger. In the top of the
third, Joe Jones tripled home Neu-
brecht who had walked, and he
himself scored on Jim Newman's
sacrifice fly to center.
In the fourth, after Joe Merullo
had flied to left, Ed Hood and
Honig hit successive singles
through the middle. Western
catcher Bud Dodge, in attempting
to pick Honig off first, threw the
ball into right field allowing Hood
to score.
Jones' single and a walk filled
the bases, but Larsen was more
than equal to the task as he in-
duced Newman to meekly pop to
short and forced Freehan to sky
to left.

seventh inning as Ihne was hit
on the back by an inside fastball.
Singles by Michalski and Hamet
sent him home with the last run
of the game.
Brefeld worked four innings and
pitched well, giving up only four
hits and fanning three, but the
Western bats had barked early
to nullify the relief pitching of
the senior moundsman.
Frustrating Atternoon
For Michigan it was an after-
noon of frustrations. Ten Wolver-
ines were left stranded in the first
five innings and besides this, the
losers did not play tiheir usual
sure game in the field. Honig fail-
ed to touch second on a throw
from 'Jones, and the errors by
Freehan and Neubrecht gave
Western two unearned runs.
Jones had three hits ond Hal-
stead and Steckley two apiece, in
leading Michigan at the plate.
Four Broncos each netted two
safeties against the combined de-
liveries of Neubrecht and Brefeld.
The loss went to Neubrecht, his
first. He has yet to post a victory
The winner was Hamet, who pitch-
ed excellent ball in relief.

Newcomnb,
Darnton New'
'M' Captains
Golfer Bill Newcomb and swim-
mer Bill Darnton were voted cap-
tains of their respective, squads
for next year at banquets for the
two teams yesterday.
Newcomb was the number two
Wolverine in the Big Ten Cham-
pionship Meet with a 306 total for
72 holes.
Darnton has narrowly missed
winning a number of close races
in distance freestyle events, not-
ably against his arch rival, In-
diana's Alan Sommers. In all his
meets this year against Sommers,
as well as those in which the twb
met last spring, Darnton has
swum even with the Indiana flash
only to lose on the last lap.
Darnton captured two seconds
in the Big Ten Championship
Meet.

HEY
GUYS-

v

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Two More Runs
The home team registered two
runs in their half of the fourth
to bolster their lead to E-2. Both
runs came on the play on which
Freehan sustained his cut.
The Wolverines, far from lying
down, threatened to overtake the
Broncos in the fifth as walks to
Hood.Neubrecht, and Jones com-
ing between Merullo's triple and
Halstead's single produced two
runs. Bob Hamet relieved the tir-
ing Larsen and fanned Newman to
end the threat and leave the sacks
full for the second consecutive
inning.
The Wolverines managed but
one hit off Hamet, a ninth in-
ning single by Halstead, but
Steckley grounded into a fast
double play to end that threat.
Western added an insurance run
off southpaw Joe Brefeld in the
Western Hospitality?
MICHIGANIAB R H RBI
Jones, 2b 4 1 3 2
Newman, rf 4 0 0 1
Freehan, c 3 0 1 0
Halstead, lb 5 1 2 0
Steckley, if 5 0 2 0
Merullo, 3b 5 1 1 1
Hood, cf 5 1 1 0
Honig, ss 4 01 0
Neubrecht, p 0 1 0 0
Brefeld, p 1 0 0 0
Syring, c 2 0 0 0
a-Spalla 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 5 11 4
WESTERN AB R H RBI
Bidelman, 2b 3 1 1 1
Gatza, cf-rf 5 1 2 1
Erickson, rf 5 1 2 0
Schoddeler, if 0 0 V00
Tomb,if, 502 0
Quilici, ss 5 1 1 1
Ihne, lb 3 20 0
Michaiski, 2b 4 1 2 1
Dodge,c 4000
Larson, p 300 1
Hamet, p 1 0 1 1
Totals 38 7 11 6
a-Walked for Neubrecht in 5th.
MICHIGAN 002 120 000-5 11 3
Western 022 200 10x-7 11 1
2B-Quilici. 3B - Jones, Gatza,
Michalski. DP-Bidelman to Quili-
ci to Ihne. E-Dodge, Neubrecht,
Freehan, Honig. PB-Freehan. HBP
-Ihne (Brefeld). SB-Steckley.
PITCHING SUMMARIES
*TIP H R ER BB S
Neubrecht 4 6 6 4 3 3
Brefeld 4 5 1 1 3 0
Larsen 4. 10 5 4 3 1
Hamnet 5 1 0 0 3 4

I '

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Four Tiger Homers Rip Twins,

I

5-2

SO THIS IS why you've written sports. You're not sure even yet if
this makes sense to you. But these are things you have lived with
-and people you've made friends with. Then you've written about.
them and tried to pass them on to your readers as living people and
vital occurrences. Often you find words inadequate-and they are.
You keep on trying as best you can. Sometimes you succeed in
trapping emotion on paper-but more often you fail. Reading back
over these few lines, you see that you've probably failed again.
But the yea ris done. So the man in motion comes to a final rest.
Mental catharsis though this may be, thanks for reading it.
Good bye.
PhiS'igs DOwn Sammies
To Wn''Softball Title

By The Associated Press
Bill White drove in five runs,
two with a first-inning homer, as
the St. Louis Cardinals handed the
San Francisco Giants their fourth
loss in five games last night 12-4.
The Giants retained a .013 per-
centage point lead in the National
League race, however, when Cin-
cinnati beat second place Los
Angeles 2-0 and Milwaukee knock-
ed off third place Pittsburgh 1-0.
Philadelphia defeated the Chi-
cago Cubs 2-1 in 10 innings in the
other NL game.
In the American League, first
place Detroit beat Minnesota 5-2
with a record-tying three con-
secutive home runs in the ninth
by Norm Cash, Steve Boros and
Dick Brown. That gave the Tigers
a 41/2 game lead over the Cleveland
Indians, who were walloped 9-0
at Los Angeles by the Angels. The
Indians had won six in a row.
Baltimore whipped Chicago's
White Sox 3-1 and Washington
rapped Kansas City 7-3 in the
only other games scheduled in the
AL.
The Cardinals collected 15 hits
while running up their one-game
scoring high of the season in sup-
port of a breezy 12-hit pitching
job by young lefty Ray Sadecki
(3-3). Sam Jones (3-3) lost it.
Don Taussig also hit a two-run
homer for St. Louis. Orlando Ce.
peda, the NL home run leader,
tagged his 12th for the Giants
Rookie Ken Hunt, a right-
hander, and reliever Bill Henry
combined for a five-hitter that
dealt the Dodgers their first shut-
out of the year. Hunt (3-2) gave
up all five hits and struck out six,
but also walked six in his 7%
innings. Gus Bell's sacrifice fly
and a single by Gordie Coleman
gave the Reds two runs in the
sixth off Don Drysdale (3-3) and
ended the Dodgers' winning streak

A triple by Frank Bolling and a
single by Ed Mathews gave the
Braves their run in the first in-
ning against Bobby Shantz (1-1),
making his first start in two sea-
sons.
Lew Burdette (4-2) shut out the
Pirates on four hits, the same
number allowed by Shantz and re-
liever Elroy Face.
The Phils won on a single by
Charlie Smith and a triple by Bob
Malkmus in the 10th off Glen
Hobbie (2-5). Winner Frank Sul-
livan (2-4) and reliever Chris
Short blanked the Cubs on five

hits after a first-inning homer by
Bill Williams.
Rookie Ken McBride (4-2) shut-
out the Indians on three hits while
the last place Angels rapped 11
hits, including homers by Leon
Wagner, Ken Hunt and Earl Aver-
ill. Jim Perry (2-3) was the loser.
The Orioles moved past Min-
nesota into fourth place on first
and second inning homers by Dick
Williams and Jerry Adair off Billy
Pierce (1-3), who struck out 12
in his six innings. Billy Hoeft (1-1)
won it with three innings of three-
hit, shutout relief by Hoyt Wil-
helm.

v --

FO LLETT'S
will buy
YOUR COLLEGE
TEXTBOOKS
for
CASH
ANY TIME
IT'S SO EASY to sell your discarded books
to FOLLETT'S. Textbook values decrease
rapidly as new editions and more up-to-date
books are constantly being published. SELL
YOUR BOOKS as soon as you have had your
exams and get today's top value for them.

a

i

Major League Standings

l

AMERICAN LEAGUE
WV L Pct.
Detroit 26 11 .703
Cleveland 21 15 .583
New York 18 15 .545
Baltimore 19 18 .514
Minnesota 18 18 .500
Washington 18 20 .474
Boston 15 18 .455
Kansas City 13 18 .419
Chicago 14 21 .400
Los Angeles 13 21 .382
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 3, Chicago 1
Washington 7, Kansas City 3
Detroit 5, Minnesota 2
Los Angeles 9, Cleveland 0
TODAY'S GAMES

NATIONAL,

GB
4%
6
7
7i4
8Y2
9
10
11

San Francisco
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia

Yj

LEAGUE
W L Pcet. GB
21 13 .618 -
23 15 .605 -
19 13 .594 1
20 15 .571 112
16 16 .500 4
14 18 .438 6
12 22 .353 9
10 23 .303 102

at

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 2, Chicago 1
Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 0
Cincinnati 2, Los Angeles 0
St. Louis 12, San Francisco 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Milwaukee (N)
San Francisco at Cincinnati (N)
Pittsburgh at Chicago
Los Angeles at St. Louis (N)

FOLLETT'S
MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
322 South State Street

Chicago at Baltimore (2, twi-night)
Boston at New York
Washington at Kansas City. (N)
Detroit at Minnesota (N)
Cleveland at. Los Angeles (N)

i

I

.1

By BOB BENSON
Phi Sigma Delta defeated Sig-
ma Alpha Mu 14-8 yesterday to
win the first place playoffs in the
social fraternity "B" softball
tournament.
The Phi Sigs were led by the
strong hitting of George Fink and
Gil Ascher, who drove in a total
of nine runs. Fink socked five
runs across the plate with two
doubles, while Ascher contributed
a grand slam homer in the sixth
inning.
Strong Attack
Ira Pearlman and Dave Shank
Gomber Wins
Sports Crown
Gomberg clinched the residence
hall IM championship yesterday
when they won the IM golf tourn-
ament. Kelsey, who had trailed
Gomberg most of the year, was
finally eliminated from the race
when they dropped out of the IM
softball tournament ahead of
Gomberg.
IM GOLF
RESIDENCE HALLS
Gomberg 369
Lloyd 370
Kelsey 372
Strauss 377
Wenley 389
Huber 397
Taylor 419
Hinsdale 422
Winchell 440
PRO FRATERNITY
Nu Sigma Nu 333
Phi Delta Phi 343
SOCIAL FRATERNITY
Sigma Nu 328
Lambda Chi Alpha 336
Psi Upsilon 345
Sigma Phi Epsilon 349
Sigma Alpha Mu 351
Pi Lambda Phi 354
Theta Xi 355
Beta Theta Pi 358
Theta Delta Chi 359
Alpha Delta Phi 360
Alpha Tau Omega 362
Zeta Beta Tau 362
Phi Kappa Psi 365
Phi Delta Theta 365
Delta Tan Delta 374
Chi Phi 379
7.tnPi t

spearheaded a strong Sammies' at-
tack which just fell short. Pearl-
man hit a two-run homer and
Shank hit a two-run triple in the
fifth inning, when the Sammies
scored five times and tied the
score at eight all..
Phi Sigma Delta came roaring
back in the sixth inning with a
six-run barrage which was high-
lighted by Ascher's grand slam
homer. The six-run edge was all
that the Phi Sigs needed to wrar
up their fourth consecutive "B'
championship.
Pitcher Paul Raeder led Sigma
Phi Epsilon into the quarterfinals
of the first place playoffs in so-
cial fraternity "A" softball as they
defeated Alpha Tau Omega 11-2
Only Two Hits
Raeder gave up only two hits in
the game and contributed a hom-
er of his own to lead the Sig Ep
to their fourth consecutive vic-
tory. These two hits added to th
two hits Raeder gave up in hi,
first game of the season represen
the only hits he has yielded dur.
ing the entire season. Until thi,
game, Raeder had pitched four-
teen straight innings of no-hi
ball which constituted two con-
secutive no-hit games.
TM SOFTBALL
RESIDENCE HALL 'B'
Michigan 8, Van Tyne 4
Gomberg 7, Adams 5
Haber 7, Kelsey 6
SOCIAL FRATERNITY 'A'
Sigma Chi 20, Delta Tau Delta 7
INDEPENDENTS
Untouchables 6, Crescents 3 (semi-
final)

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
DSTANCE
1 MOVING>=5
1273 Broadway Bl
Flint 6, Michigan Stevens
Phone Collect Lit. '40
Flint CEdar 4-1686 Manages
For Lower Free Estimates
Interstate Rates Every Friday
We own, operate, schedule and dispatch our own fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

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on SLEEPING BAGS,

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191

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State Highway Commissioner John C. Mackie announces that a
public hearing will be held at 2:00 P.M., Thursday, May 25,

PANTS



Ill

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