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May 19, 1961 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-19

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FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1961'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEV

FRIDAY MAY 9, 196 THE ICHIGA -A-- PAESV

Plant Favors Aid Change

TRACK CHAMPIONSHIPS:
Wolverines Heavy Favorites

IOWA CITY (AR) - opponents of
the Big Ten's controversial aid-to-I
athletes program lost a prelimi-
nary round yesterday as the con-
ference sports leaders opened their
spring session.
The policy-making faculty rep-
resentatives rejected in a divided
vote, a new type of aid program
pegged mainly on scholastic abil-
ity. The vote was not announced.
The chairman of the faculty
group, Marcus Plant of Michigan,
said it would be possible that all
three points in the program might
be reconsidered.
Plant said the three prime points

in the plan to replace the present
financial aid program included
elimination of the need factor;
changing the basis of determining
ability for financial aid; and re-
ducing the number of tenders
(scholarship offers) for all sports
from 100 to 80 per year.
The four-year-old need program
required parents of athletes gen-
erally to contribute to their college
upkeep commensurate with their
own financial status.
Also the financial aid was
granted, on the need basis, to
athletes in the upper two-thirds
of their high school graduating
class.
However, the upper quarter
graduates were entitled to full
financial aid under the present
plan.
Meeting separately, the confer-
ence athletic directors and foot-
ball coaches also discussed a phase
of aid to athletes. The coaches
endorsed a proposal by Iowa Ath-
letic Director Forest Evashevski to
set a limit of, 35 football scholar-
ships per year on a slide-rule basis
whereby a non-scholarship athlete
could win a tender within the 35-
player limit. But the following
year the maximum would be low-
ered to compensate for this move.
Although the football coaches
had divided sentiments on this,
they agreed that the maximum of
35 football players a year Was sat-
isfactory. Under the present allow-
ance of 100 athletes allowed for all
sports there has been no ceiling on
the number to football players.

The athletic directors still have
to act on the Evashevski proposal,
which if approved would need for-
mal certification by the faculty
representatives.
The meeting will continue today
and possibly Saturday with a joint
session between the faculty repre-
sentatives and athletic directors
scheduled for tomorrow.
The Big Ten also took formal
note of the mushrooming college
basketball scandal and announced
it intended "to keep our coaches
and boys on the alert" against the
approach of gamblers.
Although the athletic directors
made no specific mention of the
basketball scandal now under in-
vestigation, they spent consider-
able time discussing the threat of
point-shaving within the Big Ten.
Commissioner - elect Bill Reed
disclosed that the conference sub-
scribes to a special service which
indicates basketball and football
betting fluctuations.
Reed said the service enabled
the Big Ten to keep close tab on
any unusual betting switches in-
volving conference games.
"We recognize that gambling
does not exist on a widespread
basis," Reed said. "Where there
is an exchange of gambling mon-
ey, there will be chiselers and at-
tempts made to fix games.
"We have recognized this evil
and have emphasized among the
conference players and coaches
they should be wary of any im-
proper approaches by strangers."

By TOM WEBBER
The magic number for the Mich-
igan track squad today is 74.
That's the record number of'
points ever rolled up in a Big Ten
championship track meet, and pre-
meet chatter has it that this will
be the only battle the Wolverines
will have.
Any semblance of opposition has
vanished due to injuries and ineli-
gibilities. Indiana, the topthreat
to the Wolverines' hope for their
first outdoor title since 1956, has
had its squad slashed to 11 men.
Illinois, defending champ for the
third straight year, is down to 12
and it made a poor showing in the
indoor meet.
Dave Mills Injured
In addition, Purdue lost half its
potential points when its star,
Dave Mills, was injured. Michigan
State and host Iowa round out the
list of second place hopefuls.
Conceivably the Wolverines are
capable of taking as many as eight
individual championships. That's
counting all the trackmen who
have ever won a Big Ten event.
That list is composed of Tom Rob-
inson (100 and 220), Ergas Leps
(880 and mile), Bennie McRae
(high and low hurdles), Ray Locke
(shot put), and Les Bird (broad
jump).
Naturally it can't be expected
that these men will all win their
events, but when you add Dick
Cephas, Dave Martin, Jim Myman,
Steve Overton, Rod Denhart,
Bryan Gibson and Dick Thelwell

to the list, it adds up to more
depth than any other team can
muster.
Big Ten Stars
The other teams are not without
their stars, however. Illinois has
shot putter Bill Brown, and broad
jumper Paul Foreman. Minnesota's
Dave Odegard will be a challenger
in the hurdles and Michigan State
has two-miler Jerry Young and
broad jumper Sonny Akapata.
Indiana's Eddie Miles will be
trying to upset Robinson again,
and Reg Sheppard is the indoor
high jump champion.
Some of the best races of the
two-day meet could occur in the
distance events. There figures to
be a good deal of juggling around
by the coaches in these events as
they try to get the maximum
points.
Top Milers
IHeading the list of milers are
Leps and Martin. Martin reached
the high of his life last week when
he ran the mile in 4:06.9. This is
under the Big Ten record of 4:08.5
set by Michigan State's Bob Lake
in 1959.
But the best sport for the spec-
tators will be to watch that magic
number.

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
June 2 to June 13, 1961
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the "Time of Claso
is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For courses having reci-
tation only, the "Time of Class" is the time of the first recitation period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below the
regular schedule. Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at
the preceding hour.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June 10, 12, 13
will be given an examination at an earlier date. The following schedule
designates an evening time for each such examination. The instructor may
arrange with the student for an alternate time, with notice to the sched-
uling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates

1

Regular
Exam Time
Special
Period
Regular
Exam Time
Special
Period

Mon., June 12
9-12 AM
Fri., June 2
7-10 PM
Tues., June 13
2-5 PM
Tues., June 6
7-10 PM

Mon., June 12
2-5 PM
Sat., June 3
7-10 PM
Sat., June 10
9-12 AM
Wed., June 7
7-10 PM

Tues., June 13
9-12 AM
Mon., June 5
7-10 PM
Sat., June 10
9-12 AM
Thurs., June 8
7-10 PM

MARCUS PLANT
... at Big Ten meetings

Linksmen Vie for Big Ten Title

By JIM BERGER
Special To The Daily
BLOOMINGTON - Today is
judgment day for the Michigan
Golf team, as it begins the first
round of the 72-hole Big Ten Golf
Meet.
During the regular dual meet
season, the Wolverines proved
that they are definite contenders.
At Columbus they defeated Ohio
State, Purdue, and Indiana; at
Evanston they defeated North-
western and Illinois; and at Ann
Arbor they defeated Michigan
State and again Ohio State.
With some simple mathematics,
it adds up to seven victories with-
out a defeat, giving the Wolver-
ines a perfect record. These six
teams will be here today along
with Minnesota, Iowa, and Wis-
consin.
However, in a conference mr et,
as it has, been seen so many thles
in the past, the regular season
means nothing, and the question
of whether Michigan will have a
Seven Teams
In Pla offs
NEW YORK (M)- Seven teams
have qualified for the eight district
playoffs to the 1961' National Col-
legiate Baseball Championships to
be held in Omaha, Neb., the week
of June 9-14, the NCAA announced
today
A total of 28 teams will compete
in the playoffs for the eight final
berths.
The teams which have qualified
are Arizona, Texas, Southern Cal.,
Fresno State, Oklahoma State,
Florida State, and Brigham Young.
Minnesota is very likely to be
named as one of the District Four
representatives because of its posi-
tion as defending champion. The
Gophers currently are third in the
Big Ten with a 9-3 conference
record. Michigan, conference lead-
er with 8-1, Western Michigan,
and Detroit are also high on the
list. The Big Ten champion no
longer qualifies automatically, but
the committee may pick more than
one of its teams.

successful or unsuccessful season
will be decided in these two ardu-
ous days.
During the regular season, the
Wolverines have shown they are
a solid team, with every member
capable of being a medalist. Lead-
ing Michigan is Captain Joe Bris-
son, the longest tee shot hitter
on the team, and low man for
Michigan at Northwestern.
Brisson, fifth in the conference
last year, has been in a slump
this spring but is now showing
signs of breaking out.
Senior Dick Youngberg, last
week's medalist and a long tee
hitter, is out to erase the disas-
trous 33K he scored in the confer-
ence meet last year. Bill New-
comb, medalist at Ohio State, has
had a good season and has proven
himself to be a solid golfer.
Chuck Newton, the only sopho-
more on the team, has had a low
scoring year even though he has
not been medalist in any single
meet. Mike Goode, medalist in
the first meet with. Detroit, has
not shot over 80 in any one meet
this season and Tom Ahern, med-
alist in the second Detroit meet,
has improved greatly in the last
week.
Others Strong
The other teams in the confer-
ence are also strong and will pre-
sent a threat to Michigan hopes.
Ohio State has the best candidate
for meet medalist in former Na-
tional Amateur Champion, Jack
Nicklaus. The Buckeyes also have
Mike Podolski, fourth in the con-
ference last year, and Dave Dan-
iels, a consistent performer this
year.

Northwestern, which lost to
Michigan by only four strokes in
a dual meet, has Jim Wagner, Jon
Windness, Ed Menke and Rick
Gleasher. Michigan State has C.
A. Smith, third in the conference
last year, and five other strong
men.

DAVE MILLS
...record holder injured
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Detroit 23 10 .697 -
New York 16 12 .571 4%
Cleveland 16 14 .533 51/2
Minnesota 16 14 .533 52
Kansas City 13 13 .500 6/
Baltimore 15 16 .484 7
Washington 15 17 .469 71/
x-Chicago 12 16 .429 81f
Boston 12 17 .414 9
x-Los Angeles 9 18 .333 11
x-Playing night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 1, Detroit 0
Kansas City 4, Minnesota 3
Washington at Baltimore (cold)
Chicago at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Boston (N)
New York at Cleveland (N)
Kansas City at Minnesota (N)
Washington at Baltimore (N)
Chicago at Los Angeles (2) (N)

MONDAY
TUESDAY
*Classes beginning on
hour

"HE's taking me
to the Promethean
for lunchl"-Sigh-

at 8
at 9
at 10
at 11
at 12
at 1
at 2
at 3
at 4

A
B
C
D
Q
E
F
G
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J
K
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M
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P
T
will be

Fri., June
Sat. June
Mon., June
Tues., June
Sat. June
Wed., June
Thur., June
Thur. June
Mon., June

Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time
of Exam
Class Code Time of Examination

I

2
3
5
6
10
7
8
8
12
y9
2
3
5.
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Purdue's defending Big Ten
Champions have an impressive
dual meet record, and will bring
a strong team up to the tee. In-
diana, although its season's rec-
ord is not that good, will have the
advantage of playing on its own
course.
Not Threats
Wisconsin and Illinois have poor
records, and are not regarded as
too big a threat, but Iowa and
Minnesota are question marks.
Michigan has not played either of
them, and both finished higher
than Michigan in last year's meet.
Minnesota is especially strong.
With a team exclusively of sopho-
mores and juniors, they were
fourth in the conference last year.
Michigan Coach Bert Katzenmey-
er considers them a amajor threat
to Michigan's hopes.
'Up for Meet'
The Michigan mentor has this
to say about his team: "The boys
will all be up for the meet, but so
will everybody else.
"I think it will be decided on
physical stamina," continued Kat-
zenmeyer, "it's going to be a two-
day marathon, and the best con-
ditioned team will have the best
chance."
This morning at 7:00 begins the
first round, and Katzenmeyer
feels his team is ready.
L

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
the half

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3'
4
hour

Fri.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Fri.,
Eton.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

I

scheduled at the preceding

NATIONAL
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia

LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
20 9 .690 -
16 11 .593 3
17 12 .586 3
19 14 .576 3
13 13 .500 5
12 15 .423 7Y2
10 19 .345 10
8 21 .276 12

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BOWLING
at
ANN ARBOR RECREATION
STUDENT RATES
MODERN -AUTOMATIC

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Chicago
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (N)
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (N)
Los Angeles vt San Francisco (N)

Acctg. 100, 101, 200, 201
Acctg. 100, 101, 200, 201
Business Ad. 150
Business Ad. 150
Business Ad. 181
Business Ad. 181
Finance 101
Finance 101
Industr. Relations 100
Industr. Relations 100
Indust. Relations 150
Industr. Relations 150
Mktg. 100, 101
Mktg. 100, 101
Stat. 100
Stat. 100

A
P
N
R
M
H
N
V
P
G
T
E
S
F
R

Fri.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Fri.,..
Wed.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,
Mon.,
Wed.,
Sat.,
Thurs.
Mon.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

605 E. Huron

NO 2-0103

2
9
7
12
6
9
7
13
'9
10
8
12
'1
10
12
5
13
5
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3
10

III

"Your Best Bet - Call A vet"
Vu1 RANS M

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

NO 3-4545

NO 2-4477

NO 3-5800

11

Shuttle Service Between Wayne Metro. Airport and Union
CAB SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR Airports
Coil Our Office for Group Rates

E. E. 5
E.E.5
Graphics 1
Graphics 1
Graphics 2, 4
Graphics 2, 4
E. M. 2
E. M. 2

C Mon.,
U Tues.
C Mon.,
T Mon.,
J Sat.,
S Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June

9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
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1

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Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

I We Go Anywhere

24-Hour Service

F Thurs., June 8
Q Sat., June 10

I.

LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS

FOLLETT'S WILL BUY BACK
YOUR TEXTBOOKS FOR
CASH ANYTIME!
Follett's Will Buy
ALL OF THEM and
PAY YOU MORE!

1.

Bring them in when you have
finished using them ...
we'd like to buy them.
FOLLETT'S-*

D
k\ D
, has been making
/Natural Shoulder Clothing
longer than

I

q

LOWEST PRICES!

Fo

"U'"..

Bot. 1, 2
Bot. 1, 2
Chem. 4, 6, 182, 183
Chem. 4, 6, 182, 183
Econ. 51, 52, 53, 54
Econ. 51, 52, 53, 54
Econ. 71, 72
Econ. 71, 72
English 23, 24
English 23, 24
Fr. 1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 21, 22,
32, 61, 62
Fr. 1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 21, 22,
32,61,62
Geog. 1
Geog. 1
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32,
35, 36
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32,
35, 36
Latin 22
Latin 22
Physics 54
Physics 54
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32.
Sociology 60
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 3, 21, 22, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 3, 21, 22, 31, 32

C Mon.,
V Tues.,
B Sat.,
T Mon.,
N Wed.,
V Tues.,
A Fri.,
P Fri.,
R Mon.,
I Fri.,
J Sat.,
U Tues.,

June' 13

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

5
13
3
12
7
13
2
9
12
2
3

'I

-I

E
Q

Wed.,
Sat.,
Mon.,

June
June
June

7
10
5

OFFICER'S SHOES

HASPEL

S Sat., June 10

U.S. Army-Navy Type

Haspel, inventor of wash and wear §

I

clothing for sophisticated men, is also
practically the inventor of the
natural shoulder model. Our present ;:'>
collection illustrates the Haspel '
mastery of the subtle art of pleasing the .
university-minded man. Included in
the fabrics available are Sir Periors, y
Seersuckers and Poplins..t°
Sir Perior® suits $39.95 w.
Seersocker Coats $29.95
Poplin suits $45"

J

D
S.
D
R
M
U
G
V
M
Q

Tues.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.
Tues.,
Thurs.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

6
10
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6
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8
13
6
10

2- 5
9-12
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f

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Each course requiring a special examination is assigned two examina-
tion code letters. If one is preferred by the department, it is in boldface;
students may elect the other only if a conflict occurs and special permis-
sion was secured from the departmental representative at registration
time in the gymnasium. If neither is underlined, either is available for
selection by each student without regard to the section of the course in
which he is enrolled.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of the
University Final Examination Scheduling Committee. Questions concern-
ing the schedule should be directed to Edward G. Groesbeck, 1513 Ad-
ministration Building.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of

i

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c
1

El Fnec~i ffsitnb fnr_Armnv R AT I'! Nnvv , D TEC_ Air nrrD RAT f

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