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May 18, 1961 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-18

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 18, 1961

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MAY is; 1961

OCAL INSTITUTIONS:
Study Reveals Diversity,
Continuity in India Past

By GAIL EVANS

-

The importance of studying local
institutions in India is that these
studies can show the rich diver-
sity in Indian history as well as
give continuity to historical inte-
pretations, Prof. Burton Stein of
the University of Minnesota said
yesterday.'
Although there is a unity in In-
dia through the caste system and
the Brahmans, Indian culture is a
"part society," he observed. The
linguistic diversity and the diver-
sity of India itself makes even the
study of local history difficult.
The peasant aspect of society is
the basis of local history, which is
concerned with institutions found
in towns, he said.
Records in Archives
Records and documents of local
institutions come from temple 11-
braries and village' archives. From
these records historians try to
determine what effect these local
institutions have on surrounding
areas, Prof. Stein commented.
In northern India chronicles are
the major source materials but in
southern India inscriptions on
stones and metal provide most of
the historical -data for the pre-
Britisn period.,
History Begins
Often studies of the economic
and social history of India begin,
with British colonization. But
these studies present an "unreal
picture of a stable agrarian so-
ciety," he emphasized.
"Historians must go back to the
medieval setting where the in-
stitutions have their roots. In poli-
tical history historians can begin
Fraternties
To Raise Tax

with the 19th Century British in-
fluence. since political history was
not a significant integrating forcet
until this time, Prof. Stein added.
The problem of periodization is
important in establishing the be-<
ginning of the medieval and other
significant eras. Political histor-l
ians perpetuate dates like 1818,
which is an important date in the;
spread of British power, but Prof.I
Stein suggested that 1870-1880 aret
more significant dates for the)
modernization of India.
Hectorans,
Tap Twvelvel
When Zeus climbed high on gold-
en dawn
and smiled on fates of Priams'
land,
He blessed pursuit
at noble Hector's hand
The call went forth
for each to take his stand.
Then all the best of Troy were
brought
by honor to this noble band.
Those tapped were: David P.
Baron, Phi Gamma Delta; Bruce
M. Boardman, Phi Delta Theta;
Richard K. Clark, Alpha Tau Ome-
ga; Donn B. Conner, Chi Phi;
Gordon L. Elicker, Beta Theta Pi;
William C. Herrick, Delta Kappa
Epsilon; Gayle E. King, Delta Up-
silon; Michael A. Landwirth, Zeta
Beta Tau; James R. Nette, Lamb-
da Chi Alpha; Gregg H. Page, Sig-
ma Phi Epsilon; Robert V. Peter-
son, Chi Psi and Arthur L. Rosen-
baum, Zeta Beta Tau.

Philosopher
Inves igates
Social Work
The ethical problem facing so-
cial workers is whether they have
sufficient knowledge about indi-
viduals to attempt to influence the
course of their lives, Prof. Arnold
S. Kaufman of the philosophy de-
partment said Tuesday.
There are two philosophies of
social work, he observed. The func-
tionalists restrict aid to the spe-
cific problem which the client
brings to the worker. The diag-
nostics believe that "social work-
ers should attempt to deal with
the complex problems, of which
the specific problem is just a
symptom."
In the latter the social worker
must presuppose that he has some
special insight into the moral goals
which the client ought to adopt;
that he knows better steps toward
happiness than the client.
Prof. Kaufman asserted that so-
cial workers interfere with a per-
son's right of self-determination
by trying to influence clients. "It
is morally defective for a social
worker to impress his moral values
upon the client."
"I am not denying that it is
possible for one person to know
what is better for another, but it
is not reasonable for social work-
ers to have such knowledge for all.
"In government we establish
protective systems to prevent tyr-
anny of one person over another.
However, in social work there is
no way to prevent tyranny."
"Social workers lack requisite
knowledge," he continued. Al-
though they make extensive use
of psycho-analysis, social workers
still do not have enough data to
formulate conclusive steps to im-

(Continued from Page 1)
are considering other jobs. Sev-
eral members of the faculty have
had very attractive offers from
other universities, non-profit re-
search organizations and indus-
try.
Medicine .. .
Dr. William N. Hubbard, dean
of the medical school, predicted
no exodus of medical school fac-
ulty members as a result of the
appropriations cut.
Four faculty members are leav-
ing this year, he said. One is go-
ing to join a research institute
and the others will enter private
practice.
More men will be joining the
faculty than leaving it, he adds.
Nursing...
Concern about faculty attract-
ing and retaining in the face of
diminished chances for pay in-
creases is the main problem for
the nursing school, Dean Rhoda
Redd says.
As the school operates on a
calendar-year basis, it does not
Mayer To View
Delhi Master Plan
Architect-engineer Albert Mayer
will lecture on "The Regional Mas-
ter Plan for Delhi, India-A Pio-
neering Effort" at 8:00 p.m. today
in Rackham Amphitheater.

Deans of 'U' Colleges Plan for Austerity

have any indication of faculty1
turnover at this time.I
Education ...
The education school will have]
nine additional faculty members
next year, mostly financed by
grants, Dean Willard C. Olson
says.
Two lecturers and other ap-
pointments are still under con-J
sideration by the Regents.
"No one is leaving that we know
of," Prof. Olson says. "However,
some faculty members are inter-'
viewing for other positions within,
the University."
Natural Resources...
The school of natural resources
operations will remain fairly sta-
ble, Dean Stanley Fontanna pre-
dicts.
There will be no one joining or
leaving the school's faculty, nor
will programs for the coming year
be changed.
However, the school will be
pressed for operation money, al-
though the school does not know
the extent of the cutback of funds
or efficiency yet.
Social Work...
Concern over retaining young
faculty members with future po-
tential is the main problem pre-
sented to the social work school.
"Unless some funds for merit
increases is approved, it will be-
come difficult to keep the facul-
ty," Dean Fenele F. Fauri said.
Four professors have been ap-

proached by other schools, but
none has decided to leave as of
yet.
As the school's requests to the
Legislature were for increased
funds for merit raises, curriculum
and enrollment are not seriously
hurt by the austerity budget.
Public Health. . .
Public health problems now re-
quire an intensified attack and
the limitation to be imposed by
a decreased budget is a serious
threat to the school's work, Dean
Myron Wegman of the public
health school said. ',
Plans for the coming year had
included increased research on the
problems of industrial health and
nuitrition, but these and recruit-
ing will suffer from the money
cut-back.
Ito To Evaluate
Japanese..Writing
Prof. Sei Ito of Toyko Engineer-
ing University will speak on "Ways
of Thinking in Modern Japanese'
Literature" at 4:10 p.m. today in
Aud. C.

Architecture...
"The most critical problem in
the architecture college is a lack
of space," Dean Philip Youtz says.
Students are overcrowded as a re-
sult of shortages in studios, lab-
oratories, and office space. A cut
in the school's budget will also
result in curtailment of several
planned programs, including an
increase in exhibits and publica-
tions.
'Two faculty members have re-
signed to take other positions and
will be replaced, leaving the fac-
ulty at the same size," Dean Youtz
says. however, reductions might
be necessary in the teaching fel-
low program. Enrollment will re-
main constant in the next, year.
"The school is finding opera-
tions handicapped because of a
lack of sufficient operating funds,"
Prof. Youtz said. "Our needs are
not being met."
Dentistry .. .
Dean Paul Jesserich of the dent-
istry school says he cannot com-
ment on the effects of the aus-
terity budget until the school has
received more definite informa-
tion about the amount of the
school's funds.

IFC, Union
To Sponsor
Annual Sing
The Inter-fraternity Council wi l
sponsor their annual sing at 7:30
p.m. today in Hill Aud. as part of
the Michigan Union's Creative
Arts Festival.
"The Play of the Wecher" by
John Heywood and "The Twin
Menaichmi" by Platus will be pre-
sented for the second time at 4:10
today in the Arena Theatre of
the Freize Bldg.

4.

NOW SHOWING
GORGO
Bill Travers
William Sylvester
Also
KEY
WITN ESS

V

I

i

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ENDS
TONIGHT DIAL NO 8-6416
* STARTING FRIDAY

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Gift eAIra
presents
Thursday and Friday:
ON APPROVAL
Saturday and Sunday
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

I

I

U

Dm ill NO 5-629
DIAL NO 5-6290

NOW Continuous Showings
Come any time Today between
12:30 and 8:00 P.M. and see a
complete showing.
REGULAR POPULAR PRICES

Fraternity President's Assembly
unanimously approved an amend-
ment to their constitution calling
for a 50 cent increase over the
present $1.00 per man head tax
Tuesday night.
The amendment required a
three-fourths vote of the entire
body for passage. Each fraternity
will be assessed $1.50 by the Inter-
Fraternity Council for each mem-
ber and pledge starting next fall.
The new appropriation will be
used to make up an expected def-
icit this year and increase the
scope of IFC operations next year.
CO f-

"A MIGHTY PICTURE... AN EPIC FILM!-Crowther, Times

THE SPECTACULAR LOVE STORY THAT THRILLED MILLIONS!
/MARGARET MflENELLS
,.AONE WITH THEw I N
STR NGCLARK GABE VIVIEN LEIGHI
LESLIE lOWARDOtA deHAVILLAND ITCHNICOLOR
A SELZNICK INTERNATIONAL PICTURE. NELEASEo v METRO-GOLOWYN-MAYER ru.

0 ....................
"TOP-GRADE SUSPENSE"
S 'N.Y. World-Telegram & Sun
" ~~~ALLEDrElM MAKERS a.ce: ',y
" ' -'JACK HAWiKINS
" RIGEL PATRICKT
* ROGER LIVESEY
Sand
" :fi }.. , RICHARD ATIENBOROUIGH
" ''"""'I MCHAE RELPH ad AS% A~h RRRP S
: THE LEAGUE OF GENTLEMEN
. rse st.,, BRYAN FORBES KIERON MOOREROBERT COOTEE
*@. eSO@OSO@.@.O e . @ 0 *@@Oe e.

0
"
i
"
0
"
"
"
i

Three Shows Daily at 12:30- 4:15 - 8:00 P.M.
65c until 4:30 P.M. 90c until Closing

---"

wW

I

Z

II

ELLIOTT,
JACK
b. U.S. age 28

Occupation, Folksinger of
sorts who has toured Europe
and is now closing his tour
of this continent in the "cul-
tural Mecca of the Midwest"
in his only solo appearance
of this season.
BE THERE!
90C
Tomorrow,
UNION Ballroom
8:30 P.M.

S. GoCo Cinema juild
*
Tonight and Friday at 7 and 9:10 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
JEAN COCTEAU'S
BEAUTY
ONAAND THE BEAST
with Bea Lillie, Clive Brooks Music by Auric, Costumes by Berard
with Jean Marais, Josette Day
SHORT: THE BESPOKE OVERCOAT SHORT: DOUBLE WHOOPEE,
with LAUREL AND HARDY
Architecture Auditorium
50 cents

Sine the theatre awareness ofe
most of our public goes back l
only a few years, during which1
Bea Lillie has not been active'
here, a brief account of the ca-
reer of this inimitable come-
dienne is in order. Born in
Toronto in 1898, she made her
way to London with her mother
and her sister Muriel, famous1
as the composer of "You're
Rotton to the Core, Maud."
Bea's urchin - like appearance
and lackadaisical mannerj
caught the attention of Andre'
Charlot, the impresario, whoa
rescued her from third-ratea
variety reviews and gave her
natural talents the opportunity
for improvisatory self-assertion.
These are not very easy to sum-
marize. She mocks the uncon-
scious gestures-humming, un-
mirthful laughing, fussing -
that betray lack of inner con-
fidence in the most common ex-
changes of everyday life. Yet
from this groundwork her mon-
ologues send out fantastic sal-
lies that build up into a pyra-
mid of madness, which might
crumble under its weight, but
doesn't, or collapse, , if logic
had a brick to throw. She
could be compared to Harpo
Marx; but he has great pathos,
and she has not a smidgeon;
and while he seems a creature
from another planet, she is a
skeleton from the drawing-
room. Her comedy has the ef-
fect of a thin blade of steel
having the vapors.
During the 1920's she associ-
ated with the Noel Coward-
Gertrude Lawrence set; Coward
has written the words for doz-
ens of her numbers. In 1920
she married Robert Peel, great-
grandson of the prime minister;
in 1925 she became Lady Peel.
Her husband, who inherited the
socially conscious tradition of
his ancestors, formed orches-
tras of miners during the bleak
depression days and paid from
his pocket the financially minus
results of this sympathetic in-
discretion. Her son, by then
Lord Peel, was killed in action
in World War II. The present
dowager Lady Peel-for you
will find Bea Lillie in Burke's
Peerage -had two marriages:
the one on the books, with ec-
centric English nobility, and
her other marriage with the
theatre, which she regarded
with equal loyalty. During the
second world war, she worked
as an entertainer for the sol-
diers on the European front.
She has appeared in only a
few films, and in only one, On
Approval, was she in a starring
role. (The present generation
may recall her brief appearance
in the Salvation Army episode
of Around the World in Eighty
nave 1of tis.fim th rn-+-in

essentially the work of Clivef
Brook, who adapted an old F
Frederick Lonsdale comedy -
called, with conscious irony,c
"daring and modern" and set
"in grandmother's day." Queent
Victoria was the ancestralt
grandmother, and she herselfl
would have laughed at this rib-f
tickling. Clive Brook is an im-l
poverished arrogant English
earl; Roland Culver is hisi
equally impoverished but meek
friend; Googie Withers is a]
statuesque blonde, an American1
pickle heiress; and Bea Lillie is
a flinty Merry Widow. They
leave fashionable London to,
spend a period on the bleak es-
tate of the widow. The comedyy
of manners dissolves internally,
under the strain. There is a
wonderful sequence in which all,
four characters dream. The lan-
guage, before and after, is cor-
rect and hostile. They all de-
serve each other, one can say-
after some striking clashes of
verbal armies-but since they
move with complete correctness,
each side has its triumph. Time
compared the film to classical
ballet, "exquisitely styled"; but
this shows only the American
ignorance about classical ballet
which Time would surely reflect
in 1945. So-called classical bal-
let-Coppelia, Swan Lake, La
Sylphide - to mention three
widely different categories-is
essentially a romantic art.
But Time was correct about
the film's essential stylization.
Many contributed to it-the ori-
ginal author Lonsdale, with his
sense of period; Cecil Beaton,
who designed the sets and cos-
tumes; Clive Brook, who not
only adapted it to the screen
but directed, produced, and
starred in it; and as muchas
others Bea Lillie, who is the
most hard-grained, cross-
patched frustrated Victorian fe-
male on record; we should add,
in modesty, filmically.
This is definitely a film for
the sophisticated.
The short subject merits more
than this brief note. Produced
by Wolf Mankovitz, The Be-
spoke Overcoat, based on the
Gogol story, is presented in an
east London setting, a Yiddish
paraphrase that makes more
meaningful the atmosphere of
loneliness and poverty in the
original.
* * *
Using a theme that has been
kept alive in the memories and
imaginations of children and
adults over the centuries, and
which in modern times has ap-
peared again and again in such
forms as King Kong and Dr.
Jekyl and Mr. Hyde, Jean Coc-
teau, better known for his in-
terest in Surrealism than in'
Mothe r Cnnge ereated what by

following comments have been
extracted: "After a year of
preparation and obstacles of
every sort, viola! tomorrow I
shoot . . . . From the run-
through I am convinced that
the rhythm of La Belle et Ua
Bete is a narrative rhythm. I
am telling a story. It's as if
hidden behind the screen, I say:
'And then such and such a
thing comes to pass.' The char-
acters do not act as if they were
living, but living a life that is
being told. Perhaps this is
necessary in a fairytale .. .
I've been shooting in the rain,
without lights, using torches,
magnesium flares and fumees
anglaises. No matter what it
costs, I am determined to evoke
the beauty which comes by ac-
cident and which I love ...
Marais' voice seems to me
most impressive. The voice of a
sick creature, an animal in
pain ...
Alekhan is timid. He hesitates.
He does not dare to work for
harsh effects in his photogra-
phy. The result is a certain soft-
ness that I have to correct.
Everything is still too pretty. I
want it rougher, with more con-
trasts. I shall badger him until
he comes round . . . After the
projection I scold him. His
mania for 'camera effects' and
diffusion offends me. That's the
arty way. Nothing is better than
a sublimation of the documen-
tary style. That's the style I
want to get out of him . .
Nothing seems to me duller
than photographic unity in a
film, a unity that the experts
take for style. A film should
entertain the eye with contrasts,
with effects that do not try to
copy nature's but seek 'that
truth which Goethe. calls the
opposite of reality. It is not be-
cause -I am dealing with a fairy
tale that I take such liberties
with realism. A film is a writing
in pictures, and I am trying to
impart to mine an atmosphere
which will correspond more to
feelings than to facts .. .
Once more I burn my eyelids
and cheeks under the arcs. Burn
upon burn. I shall pay dearly
for this film ... Two mad days,
near the breaking point, won-
dering if anyone else ever
worked at a film with such
fury .. .
I have finished. Which means
I now begin-I begin the mon-
tage . . . . This day is for the
music . . . I had unconsciously
made a music of my own which
these waves of orchestral sound
contradict. By degrees Auric tri-
umphs over my discomfort. My
music gives way to his. His
music marries my picture, im-
pregnates it, exalts it, com-
pletes it . . .. Yesterday ,I pre-
snted it (the film) in the nro-

'M

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-p ~f ~ rA *__Under the floodlights-They dared
Fg the most terrifying perils on Earth!
-_____In the backstage shadows-
they faced the deadlier violence
Sof their own passions!
"' MffADANA M

JIM .
.:
;::

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