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May 16, 1961 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT

ThlE htCfll AN DAILY

TUESDAY. MAY 16. 1961

ORE Claims Sit-ins
ExperienePressure '

DALY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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By BEATRICE TEODORO
The Southern sit-ins are ex-
periencing a "publicity squeeze,"
because of the policies of Southern
newspapers and officials, Rudolph
Lombard, chairman of the New
Orleans branch of the Congress of
Racial Equality said Saturday.
"News coverage has fallen off
deliberately," Lombard said. News-
papers realize that the reporting of
the sit-ins arouses the interest
of the public and helps the de-
segregation movement, he said.
City officials realize that any vio-
lence that might occur during a
sit-in would be a reflection on
their community, so they also
bring pressure to minimize cover-
age.
He mentioned that the "jail-in
technique"' was the most recent,
action to be effective in gaining
publicity, and cited the extensive.
national coverage of the arrests
and "jail, no bail" action in si,-ins
in Rock Hill, S.C.
A student at Xavier University,
Lombard pointed out the difficul-
ties in the prediction that success
in the desegregation movement
would come early in New Orleans
because of the city's diversified
Spanish, French and Creole back-
ground.
As the movement became more
active and the issues intensified.
people began to take sides, he said.
Although the Negroes are scat-
tered throughout the city in their

living areas, there is "no com-
munication between them andj
their white neighbors."
He pointed out progress in the
area with the establishment of
inter-racial groups discussing de-
segregation processes. He also
cited the revised policy of Tulane
University to accept students re-
gardless of race although the uni-
versity was first established for
the education of white males.
yi":i - om:{ 4:-v
.OX

RUDOLPH LOMBARD
.. ORE representative

MANIPULATION OF SYMBOLS:
Brumfiel Describes Outline
For Ideal Math Curriculum

The ideal mathematics curricu-
l um should be built around con-
cepts of mathematcs rather than
around the formal manipulation
of symbols that represent the con-
cepts, Prof. Charles E. Brumfiel,
of the mathematics department,
said Saturday.
"We have in the past taught for
the most part, from kindergarten
through early college years, a dull
mathematics curriculum that
places a heavy premium upon
manipulation and ignores con-
cepts," he told mathematics teach-
ers atthe Michigan Schoolmaster's
Club meeting.
"We have given students much
to do, but little to think about."
Hatehers To Hold
Final Open House
President and Mrs. Harlan Hat-
cher will hold their final open-
house of the semester at their
home 4-6 p.m. Wednesday.
The last open house will be spon-
sored by the Michigan Union. En-
tertainment will be provided by the
Friars.
Polk To Discuss
Fertile Crescent
Prof. William R. Polk of the
Harvard Center for Middle Eastern
Studies will speak on "The Fertile
Crescent and Europe in the Nine-
teenth Century" at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in Aud. A.

He pointed out that the choice
of what is taught is not nearly as
important as the way it is taught.
The demands of American culture
will eventually dictate the broad
outlines of the mathematics cur-
riculum.
The task of the teacher will not
always be to feed predigested facts
to children, but rather open doors.
of knowledge to them, he de-
clared.
Prof. Brumfiel made several pre-
dictions about future mathema-
tics teaching. He noted that teach-
ers are .going to convince them-
selves the mathematics they teach
is difficult and there is no easy
way to persuade all children to
digest it.
A" relatively small amount of
children have a great aptitude of
mathematics, Prof. Brumfiel said.
Elementary arithmetic teaching
may be strongly influenced by
machine teaching. Blunders, and
dull programs stressing manipula-
tion will occur, but programs that
will nourish creativity and en-
courage the discovery of concepts
will be developed.
He also predicted a reaction
against machines that tend to
clutter the classroom. The child
needs an environment that en-
courages him to count and invent
short cut calculation procedures.
Positions open
In SGC Group
Petitions for student positions
on the Committee on Membership
in Student Organizations are
available on the first floor of the
Student Activities Building.
Two one-year positions are open
to students at this time. The Com-
mittee on Membership studies and
makes recommendations on mat-
ters regarding the regulation that
all student organizations shall
selectm embership on the basis of
personal merit and not race, color,
religion creed, national origin or
ancestry.
Petitions must be returned to the
Administrative Secretary of Stu-
dent Government Council on the
3rd floor of the SAB by 5 p.m.
Monday.

(Continued from Page 4)
Program arrangements for the follow-
ing visitor are being made by Psy-
chology Dept.: Dr. E. Lowell Kelly.
Kyato Kuraski, Psychology, Japan,
May 15.
Program arrangements for the fol-
lowing visitor are being made by School
of Natural Resources: Richard Meier.
George Ellsworth, Reader, Electrical
Engineering, Univ. of. Adelaide, Aus-
tralia, May 14-17.
Events Tuesday
Mathematics Colloquium: Dr. M. P.
Schutzenberger of -Paris, France, will
speak on "On Free Group, Free Semi
Groups and the Theory of Coding"
Tues., May 16, at 3:00 p.m. in 3011 An-
gell Hall.
Rerfreshments in 3212 Angell Hall at
2:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for James Har-
wood Stoddard, Mathematics; thesis:
"Regular Convergence in a Paracompact
Space," Tues., May 16, 2009 Angell Hall,
at 2:30 p.m. Chairman, R. L. Wilder.
Events Wednesday
University Choir and Michigan Singers
(Tour Choir): The University Chair and
Michigan Singers (Tour Choir), under
the direction of Maynard Klein, will
present a concert on Wed., May 17,
8:30 p.m. in Hill Aud. The Choir will
sing Handel's "Israel in Egypt" and the
Singers will present compositions of
Schubert, Strauss, Berhstein, Well, and
Rodgers. Karen McCann will accom-
pany both groups. Open to the public.
Tomorrow and Thursday at 4:10 p.m.,
the Department of Speech will con-
clude tes Laboratory Playbill Series for
the year by presenting a twin bill
of comedies in the Arena Treatre, Frieze
Bldg. John Heywood's pre-Elizabethan
farsce "The Play of the Wether," and
a cutting of Plautus' "Twin Menaech-
mi" will be performed. No admission.
..Lecture: Dr. W. J. T. Morgan, Lis-
ter Institute, London, England, will
discuss "Some Biochemical Aspects of
the Human Blood-Group Specific Sub-
stances" on Wed., May 17 at 4 p.m.
in the School of Public Health Aud.
Lecture: Burton Stein, Asst. Prof. of
History, Univ. of~ Minnesota, will speak
on "Advantages of Local Studies in
Interpreting the History of India."
Wed., May 17, 4:10 p.m., 229 Angell
Hall.
Sociology Colloquium: May 17, "Pop-
ulation and Politics inLatin America"
by Nathan Keyftz, Prof. of Political
Economy, Univ. of Toronto in East
Conference Rm., Rackham Bldg., at
4:15 p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar: May
17 at 4 p.m. in 229 West Engineering
Bldg. Donald Patterson, GraduateStu-
dent in Mechanical Engineering will
speak on "The Simulation of an In-
ternal Combusstion Engine on a Digi-
tal Computer."
Doctoral Examination for Robert
Campton Ennen, Library Science; thes-
is: "The Gradus ad Parnassum," 10
University Library, at 3:00 p.m. Chair-
man, R. L. Kilgour, Wed., May 17.
Doctoral Examination for Clare Lee
Colegrove, English Language & Litera-
true; thesis: "A Critical Edition of
REFRESH YOUR
Dry cleaned or
laundered size
guaranteed with
our own special
equipment.
Special rates for
summer processing
for fraternities,
sororities and
rooming houses.
Call NO 3-4185
for free estimate.
Kq.

MODEL LAUNDRY
and CLEANERS
627 S. Main

Thomas Moddleton's Your Five Gal- t
lants'," Wed., May 17, East Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 7:00 p.m.
Chairman, G. B. Harrison.1
Placement t
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau!
of Appointments-Senior & grad. stu-
dents, please call Ext. 3371 for inter-
view appointments with the follow-
ing:
THURS., MAY 18-
Fidelity Mutual Life Ins. Co., Detroit
-Men with degrees in Lib. Arts or
Bus. Rd. for Sales.'
United Air Lines, Chicago-Location :
10 major U.S. cities-Passenger Service
Dept. WOMEN as Airlines Stewardess-
es. Prefer at least 2 yrs. callege or equi-
valent business. Nursing trng. very
helpful.
FRI., MAY 19-
HardwareMutuals, Grand Rapids,
Mich.-Location: Ann Arbor & Wash-
tenaw County area. Men for Claims:
Adjuster. LLB or MBA desirable. A na-
tional firm, having offices all- over
U.S. Interviews will be held at Michi-
gan Union. Candidates may call Bureaul
for appointments.
SUMMER PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
WED., MAY 17-
Camp Conestoga, Leonidas, Mich. -
Steve Baumann interviewing men only
for general counseling positions as well
as openings as Athletic Director, Water
Skiing Instructor, & Kitchen Helper.
Hilltop Camp-Walloon Lake, Mich.
-Bill Bauerle interviewing men for
positions as Sailing Counselor & Wood-
shop Instructor. Also one woman as
Cabin Counselor.
For further information, visit the
Summer Placement Service, D-528 SAB.
Open each weekday afternoon from
1:00 to 5:00 and all day Friday.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
International Atomic. Energy Agency,
Wash., D.C.-Scientists & Technical Ex-
perts-20 additional openings overseas
for highly qualified men in Atomic
Energy Field. Contracts vary from 3.
mos. to 1-2 yrs. Assignments to Near
East, Far East & South America-
1961-62. Some positions require facility
Organization
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Discussion, May 16, 12 Noon,
524 Thompson.
Democratic Socialist Club, Panel Dis-
cussion: "The Negro Movement: Where
Is It Now?" Where Is It Going?", May
17, 8 p.m., Union, Rm. 3K.
Folk Dancers, Meeting, Officers will
be nominated, Dancing & Instruction,
May 16, 7:30 p.m., Community Center,
Call NO 3-2085 after 5:30 p.m. for
transportation.'
German Club, Meeting, Film: "The
Captain of Kopenick," May 16, 8 p.m.,
Angel] Hall, Aud A;FCoffee Hour, May
17, 3-5 p.m., 4072 FB.
* * 4:
Wesley Fdn., Holy Communion follow-
ed by breakfast,M 7 .m., 1st Meth.
Church, Chapel; Mid-Week Refresher
4-5 p.m., Wesley Lounge; May 17.

I -, ........................ I

{ II
fI
cziL

with Spanish, French or Korean lan-
guage.
Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Mass.-
Immediate openings for gradutee R.N.'s
as Staff Nurses. Career growth aided
by broad In-Service Education & Tui-
tion Refund Program.
State of Ohio-Graduate Civil Enge-
neers for PositionsopenIn Ohio Dept.
of Highways. Under Ohio Civil Serv-
ice. After completion of 4 yr. exper-
ience requirement, Engineeoing-in-
Training is reclassified as a Professional
Engineer.
Please contact Bureau of Appts., 4021
Admin., Ext. 3371 for further informa-
tion.
Par t-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Non-Academic Per-
sonnel Office, Room 1020 Administration
Building, during the following hours:
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to,
12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring part-
time or temporary employees should
contact' Jack Lardie at NO 3-1511, ext.
2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Room 1020, daily.

MUNION
PRESENTS
HATCHER
TEA

MALE
3-Meal jobs.
1-Desk-clerk, Monday and Wednes-
day 7-11:30 p.m., and Saturday 7
p.m.-1 a.m.
1-Janitor, must be over 21, Monday-
Friday, 2-6 p.m., and Saturday 10
a.m.-6 p~m.
1-Share apartment in exchange for
10 hours of work, per week, must
be free Wednesday 1-3:30 p.m.
3-Counter assistants,-hours to be
arranged.
19-Psychological subjects, hours to be
arranged.
1-Inventory assistant, full-time May
28 thru June 1 or 2.
1-Inventory assistant, 12:30-4:30 p.m.,
May 23 thru 28.
1-Boy to help inkitchen in exchange
for meals (private home).
1-Counter asst., Monday, Wednesday,
Friday 3-7 p.m., Tuesday & Thurs-
day 4-6 p.m., Saturday 2-6 p.m.
1-Experienced electrical repair-man,
full-time summer, and as many
hours as possible during the school
year.
5-Salesmen, commission basis.
FEMALE
3-Waitresses, full-time or part time.
11-Psychological subjects, hours to be
arranged.
3-Waitresses, weekend work, full-time
during summer.
1-Clerk-typist, permanent position,
20 hours per weegk, prefer student
wife.

.

I
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i
f
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TAXATION:
City Initiates Negotiations
To Assess Fraternaties
By MICHAEL HARRAH
have the money in their budget
The City of Ann Arbor is nego- to pay it."
tiating with the various fraterni- He said that the property would
ties and sororities to assess their be placed on the tax rolls next
personal property (furniture, January, but that all such prop-
equipment) for taxation, Ann Ar- erty might not be covered. The
bor City Assessor Howard Ledbet- city is not in the habit of taxing
ter said yesterday, in amounts below $100 in this
"I am attempting to make sure area, and, since personal proper-
that all taxable property in the ty is taxed one-third of its as-
city is assessed," he said. "If we sessed value, at least $300 worth
ignore even one area of poten- of property would have to be
tial assessment, we are derelict ih owned.
our duty to distribute that tax "We will assess each house in-
burden equally." dividually," he concluded. "Up to
Ledbetter said that the city has now there has been a general mis-
agreed to delay effecting this tax- conception that since fraternities
ation for one year, since "it took and sororities are non-profit or-
the fraternities and sororities com- ganizations, they are tax exempt.
pletely by surprise. They didn't This of course, is not so."

r

4

Wednesday, May 17
4:00-6:30
FRIARS will be there.

But who wants to walk across Europe when
travel for one month costs only $110.
With one convenient ticket en- included For free folder write
joy the luxury of 'unlimited first Eurailpass, Dept G-2 Box 191,
class rail service through 13 N.Y 1, N.Y. Buy Eurailpass from
countries. See the real Europe, your travel agent.
its friendly people, its historic For travel in Austria, Belgium,
places Go anywhere, Denmark, France,
everywhere! Stop where Germany, H o l a n d,
you want, when you Italy, Luxem bourg,
wish. Be guided by glor. n=o .. .- Norway, Po r t ugal,
ious impulse. Many bus. - Spain, Sweden, and
boat and ferry services Switzerland.
Two-month Eurailpass just $150; three months only $180.

. I

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ii:

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.-

S! 1111,11,0AI; £ " . " '

HI!

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
cin. ape19 & completion of at least Iyearofcoiileg.
GRADUATE STUDENTS and FACULTY MEMBERS
THE ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS
, .. comprising 350 outstanding Boys, Girls, Brother-Sister
and Co-Ed Camps, located throughout the New England, Mid-
dlq Atlantic Staabi and Canada.
... INVITES YOUR INQUIRIES concerning summer employ-
ment as Counselors, Instructors or Administrators.
... POSITIONS in children's camps, in all areas of activities,
are available.
Write, Phone, or Call in Person
Association of Private Camps - Dept. C
55 West 42nd Street, OX 5-2656, New York 36, N. Y.

The subject of "world affairs" is no longer a cocktail
party gambit, nor should it be reserved for the lecture
platform.
Today, we need to be informed-literally for our sur-
vival. How can we avoid another Laos? The Black
Muslims... who are they? What do they want? Are
we losing in the race for nuclear Weapons, in the ex-
ploration of outer space?
To answer such questions the Contemporary Affairs
Society proposes a seminar on survival, right in your
own home, with your family and friends. The impor-
tant books recommended for this seminar are chosen
by men you can trust, who are themselves authorities
in government, science, politics and world affairs.
THE CONTEMPORARY
AFFAIRS SOCIETY
The Sponsors of the Contemporary Affairs Society
are Walter Lippmann, Dorothy Fosdick and Marquis
Childs. The Board of Sponsors confirms nominations
to the Board of Judges and advises on literary projects
in the field of contemporary affairs. The Board of
Judges makes the monthly selection.
OUR BOARD-OF JUDGES:
Richard Rovere, staff writer for "The New Yorker,"
author of its "Letter from Washington."
John Sherman Cooper, U. S. Senator from Kentucky
and former Ambassador to India.
Roscoe Drummond, columnist for "The New York
Herald Tribune"; co-author, "Duel at the Brink."
Ernest K. Lindley, Senior Editor, Director of the
Washington Bureau of "Newsweek"; columnist and
author.
Louis M. Lyons, Curator of the Nieman Fellowships,
Harvard University..
A. H. Raskin, Labor Affairs Reporter of The New
York Times.
Jerome B. Wiesner, Science Adviser to the President;
Director, Research Lab. of Electronics, M.I.T.

FREE OFFER
IF YOU JOIN NOW
By joining now you can take advantage of this special
introductory offer and receive free
EITHER
A year's subscription to one of these magazines:
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The Journal of the American Academy of Arts and
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single topic of contemporary importance, such as
Arms and Arms Control.
Partisan Review
Published bimonthly, the Partisan Review offers, in
addition to fiction, poetry and criticism, essays on
general cultural problems.
Commentary
A monthly magazine, Commentary offers its readers
many of today's new ideas long before they become
part of the public consciousness. Published by the
American Jewish Committee.
Nieman Reports
A Quarterly Review of Journalism, the Nieman
Reports carries authoritative articles by leading jour-
nalists on the problems of a free press.
OR
A Dictionary in one of-these languages:
French Dictionary All Cassell's Dictionaries,
German Dictionary thumb-indexed, famous for
their authoritativeness, conven-
Italian Dictionary ience and comprehensiveness.
Spanish Dictionary French Dictionary, Retail
Latin Dictionary Price, $5.75; others, $7.75.
English-Russian Dictionary -V. K. MUller's Dic-
tionary. Sixth Edition. Invaluable for any student of
the Russian language or culture. Retail Price $6.95.
As a member you need purchase only five books of-
fered by the Contemporary Affairs Society within a

OF THESE OUTSTANDING BOOKS Pub
Price
O #SS/CONGO: BACKGROUND OF CONFLICT ..$6.00
Alan P. Merriam
O #20/THE NECESSITY FOR CHOICE ..........$5.50
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O #14/THE PURPOSE OF AMERICAN POLITICS $5.00
Hans J. Morgenthau
O #71/MAN AND SPACE: THE NEXT DECADE.. .$4.95
Ralph E. Lapp
O #15/THE ATTACK ON WORLD POVERTY.... $5.00
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O #19/CONGRESSITS CONTEMPORARY ROLE $4.50
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O #32/THE AMERICAN SUPREME COURT....$5.00
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C. Eric Lincoln

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I'm Barbara Swift
A United Airlines
Stewardess.
I'll be interviewing

YOU MAY START YOUR MEMBERSHIP WITH ANY

CONT EMPORY
AFFAIRS ;...
USE THIS COUPON TO JOIN TODAY. MD-I
Please enroll me as a member of the Contemporary
Affairs, Society and send me at once the magazine
subscription or Dictionary which I have indicated. I
agree to purchase at least five books from you during
the coming year. I understand that with every fourth
book I purchase, I will receive a bonus book free.
CONTEMPORARY AFFAIRS SOCIETY
NATIONAL PRESS BUILDING, WASHINGTON,D.C.
I have checked in one of the boxes below the one.
year magazine subscription or Dictionary Iwant free.
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o Partisan Review Q Cassell's Italian Dictionary
O Commentary Q Cassell's Spanish Dictionary
O Niemnan Reports 0 Cassell's Latin Dictionary
El Cassell's French Q V. K. Muller's English-Russian.

t-

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on campus
May 17-18
If you're a travel-minded
young woman between 5'2"
and 5'8", I'd like to meet you
and tell you about the excit-

SOPH SHOW

MASS MEETING

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