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May 12, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-12

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TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIlAV -MAY '2

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'ULLBRIGHT SCHOLAR:
Sasaki Calls Mysticism.
Unique toOriental Rites-

By SANDRA JOHNSON
In the orient, religions are mys-
tical, Prof. Genjun H. Sasaki of
Otani University, Japan, and Ex-
change Fulbright Professor at
Harvard University, said yester-
day.
"Mysticism can be found in the
United States, but not very often,"
Prof. Sasaki continued,
Prof. Sasaki pointed out that
during his stay in the United
States he has observed one in-
stance when people seem mystic-
ally inspired and ecstatic, and that
is while they are listening to jazz.
They sit and listen, absorbed by
the drumming and the beating.
"I've never seen so much ec-
stacy, Prof. Sasaki quipp'ed.-
Critic Views
Abstract Art
By BARBARA PASH
The major difficulty in con-"
structively criticizing abstract art
is- the lack of words to convey
the meaning of the painting, Prof.
James Ackerman, of the fine arts
department at Harvard, said yes-
terday in his lecture, "Abstract
Art: The Critic's Nemesis."
"Abstract art has assaulted our
old structures violently and we are
still trying to find words to ex-
press it," he explained.
Artist Free
In abstract art, the artist has
freed himself from the conven-
tional symbols of every-day life.
Common forms and shapes are
often no longer distinguishable.
Hence the viewer is frustrated;
he doesn't understand the paint-
ing because the message which the
artist intended to convey is ob-
scured by the lack of reference to
every-day objects, Ackerman ex-
plained.
"A certain amount of training
is needed to understand the mes-
sage of abstract art. Because of
the unconventional structure of
abstract art, many critics assume
that a structure to which there are
no- verbal descriptions is not a
structure," he said.
Criticism Catches Up
However, asserting that it takes
criticism some time to catch up to
art, Ackerman explained that the
critic must achieve a stable cri-
teria for judging abstract art.
He acknowledged that modern
art is usually viewed differently,
but added that if every major art
style is viewed differently, criti-
cism would be reduced to the level
of "relativism" and would be
pointless.
Ackerman conceived criticism as
a "dialogue" between the artist
and the critic. The critic is an "ac-
tive agent" in receiving the mes-
sage of the artist through the ar-
tist's painting.
Union To Sponsor,
Foreign Car Show
The Union will hold a foreign1
auto show 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Saturday, May 13 at the South
Quadrangle recreation area' at
Packard and Madison. The show;
is being directed by the Union
International Affairs Committee in
conjunction with the creative arts
festival. Admission is free.
Holland To Lead
Colloquium Today
John H. Holland of the phios-
ophy department will lead a col-
loquium under the auspices of the
psychology department entitled,
"Theory of Adapted Systems," at
4:15 p.m. today in Aud. B.

Organization
Noticess
Baha' Student Group, Discussion::
"Religion Renewed," May 12, 8 p.m.,
2029 Ferdon. Calf NO 3-2904 for trans-
portation. - *
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Discussion, May 12, 12
Noon, 524 Thompson.
S* s
Lutheran Student Assoc., Organ Re-
cital: Dr, H. Vollenweider, visiting or-
gj nist from Switzerland, May> 12, 7:30
p.m., Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Newman Club, Dance "Richard Re-
members," May 12, 8:30 p.m=. 331
Thompson.

"Buddhist philosophy in India
starts from the negation of self.
Although self is the basis of the
development of the world for an
individual, it is at the same time
the basis of disorder and suffer-
ing," he explained.
Buddhists believe that by look-
ing at the world through egotistic
view of self, one's vision is dim-
med and distorted. Only by deny-
ing self can one see the world as
it actually is; only in this way
can one penetrate externals to
grasp the inner meaning. To deny
oneself is not only to deny con-
sideration of one's physical self,
but also to deny one's own ab-
stract ideas.
No Past for Buddhists
According to Buddhism, Prof.
Sasaki continued, the past is no
longer in existence, the future is
yet only an abstract idea - only
the present is real.
Thus ultimate truths and the
kingdom of God-and all other
abstract goals that other religions
try to attain in the future-must
be denied.
SGCPasses
Peace Corps
Speaker Plan
At Wednesday's meeting, Stu-
dent Government Council passed a
peace corps motion' proposed by
James Yost, '63, and Kenneth Mc-
Eldowney, '62.
As directed by the motion, SGC's
education committee will complete
an investigation on the possibili-
ties of having Adlai Stevenson,
foreign ambassadors, and top of-
ficials of the peace corps come to
the University to speak on the,
corps. The investigation will en-
able the Council to contact appro-
priate speakers and to hold the
program before the end of the
year.
Approve Appointments
The members approved the ap-
pointments of the three adminis-
trative representatives to the
Steering Committee for the con-
ference on the University. The
appointees are John Bingley, As-
sistant Dean of Men; Prof. Charles
Lehman, of the education school;
and Secretary ad Assistant to
the President Erich Walters.
Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs James A. Lewis joined the
Committee of the Whole in order
to answer questions concerning the
restructure of SGC.
Lewis said that certain changes
need to be made in order to re-
lieve Council members from so
much paper work. "SGC needs to
change some things. Study it,
make the changes you think neces-
sary, and we will do all we can
to finance the changes you de-
cide on," he said.
Hanson Motion
A motion proposed by Per Ran-
son, '62, to alleviate this situation
was passed. Hanson's plan dis-
solves the administrative wing of
the Council and establishes three
new committees.
The members approvd the ap-
pointments of Judy Caplan, '61,
Bruce Leitman,. '63, and John
Scott, '61, for the early registra-
tion pass committee. The chair-
man of the committee is Mark
Moskowitz, '63. ,

Sees Shift
In German
World View
By CYNTHIA NEU
"The most important historical
event in the last ten years is the
establishment of friendship be-
tween Germany and the West,"
Erich Neumann, founder and pres-
ident of the German Institute of
Demoscopy (Public Opinion) said
in a lecture yesterday.
In the last ten years, the psy-
chology of the German people has
undergone a change, as shown by
the increased orientation toward
democratic government u n d e r
West German Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer. The future of his gov-
ernment will be decided by the
election next fall, he said.
Looks To Future
"Germany is not proud of its
past, but it is now peering into
the future," Neumann said. This
future will grow out of a present
"more stable" condition in Ger-
many.
The West German people them-
selves express a feeling of opti-
mism, as shown by a survey con-
ducted by the Institute in which
one-fifth of 2,000 West Germans
said "life is getting better."
This optimism does not carry
over to the problem of reunifica-
tion of Germany, however. Al-
though the survey showed that
the majority of West Germans
wishfully eye reunification, less
than one per cent thought re-
unification was possible within the
next year and one-third said it
would never be accomplished
through peaceful means.
Suggest Eichmann Penalty
The poll also showed that two
out of three West Germans
thought Adolf Eichmann should
be given a death penalty or life
imprisonment. Seventy-eight per
cent favored only moderate pun-
ishment for anti-Semitic acts,
Neumann said.
The survey also indicated an
increasing support for the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization and
although the majority of the peo-
ple have less hope of living to
see the unification of Europe than
ever before, 78 per cent would
affirm it if it were put to a vote.

Notes Change from Czar to Emperor

By RONALD WILTON
The transition from a feudal to
a unified Russia saw a change
from a medieval Russia which
worshiped a God and existed for
a devine purpose to an 18th cen-
tury Russia which existed for and
Plan Honor
For Griffin
An oil painting of Prof. Clare
E. Griffin of the business ad-
ministration school will be pre-
sented to the school in his honor
at 11 aan. tomorrow.
The painting honors Prof. Grif-
fin's long service to the Univer-
sity. He was dean of the business
administration school from 1929
to 1944. Since then he has held
the Fred M. Taylor Professorship
of Business Economics. He will
retire at the end of this semester.
E. J. Thimme, general superin-
tendent of electrical distribution
of a New Jersey utility company
will present the portrait following
Prof. Griffin's talk on "The New
Face of American Capitalism."
Thimme is an alumnus of the
University's public utility execu-
tive program, a summer session
event which has featured lectures
by Prof. Griffin.
The presentation is part of the
thirty-first alumni conference 'of
the business administration school.
Arab To Discuss
Neutralist Policies
Fawzi Abu-Diab, director of the
Midwest Arab Information Center
in Chicago, will speak on "Positive
Neutralism and the Arab World"
at 4:30 p.m. today in conference
Rm. 2 of the Women's League.
MIKE SH ERKER,
the BEACHCOMBERS
and YOU ! TON ITE
at Cafe Promethean
9-12 .75

believed in itself, Prof. Michael
Cherniavshy of Wesleyan Uni-
versity said yesterday.
In his talk entitled "Czar and
Emperor," Cherniavshy showed
how the two words personified the
change which took place with the
rule of Peter the Great during the
18th century.
To the Russians there was only
one Czar in the world and he was
the universal Christian ruler. The
purity of men's souls depended up-
on Christian Russia which in turn
depended on a Christ-like Czar,
he said.
Both Ruler and Man
Just as Christ was both God and
Man, so the Czar was both ruler
and man. His personal nature was
described by such adjectives as
most gentle, Christ-like, and pious.
His position of office was lauded
by phrases such as "beloved of
God" and "crowned by God,"
Cherniavshy said.
Peter the Great changed this.
From the beginning of his reign
he did away with the image of
piety and substituted'Mother Rus-
sia. He served Russia instead of
Christ.
Crowned by Own Senate
Having been crowned Emperor
by, a Senate of his own creation,
Quadrants Select
Faculty Members
The West Quadrangle Quadrants
tapped two honorary members
Wednesday night.
They are Prof. Allen Menlo of
the education school, Faculty As-
sociate of Allen-Rumsey- House,
and Prof. William Willcox, of the
history department, Faculty As-
sociate of Winchell House.

Peter owed his title to himself
and not to Christ. He considered
himself the image of God, but
this was a distant father God
rather then Christ.
Cherniavshy illustrated his
points with slides of Ivan the
Terrible wearing religious robes
and a picture of Peter in Western
armor. These pictures show how
victories replaced saints and the
Emperor replaced the Trinity, he
said.
College Adds
Two Courses
In Chemitstry.
Two consecutive courses in the
principles of physical chemistry,
Chemistry 265 and 266, and a
change in requirements, will be
added to the engineering curric-
ulum this fall, Associate Dean
James C. Mouzon announced.
Chemistry 265 will be available
to a student who has completed
elementary college chemistry and
will take advantage of his train-
ing in college mathematics and
physics. These new chemistry
courses are to meet the need of
engineering students who require
more background in the princi-
ples of physical chemistry, he said.
"There is a trend for all degree
programs to require a computer
course in view of the growing use
of computers in problem solving."
In line with this trend, Math 373
has been made a requirement in
chemical, electrical, materials,
mechanical and marine engineer-
ing.

QUADDIES:
Let's All Go And . .
Forget the Beta House-Read
CHAFF

OUT TODAY ot:
Blue Front
Campus Corner Drugs
Campus Smoke Shop
Follett's
Lumbard's
Bob Marshall's

Marshall's Drugs
Michigan Pharmacy
Munion's Stand
Slaters
State Drugs

Village Apothecary
Wohr's
Wikel Drugs
Wikel-Shurx Drugs
Wotham's Drugs
Clark's Tearoom

i-M i~iiii

.:

cf
a

presents

4

AYN

RAND'

in a lecture
OUR AGE-AN AESTHETIC
VAC UU M
Sunday, May 14
HILL AUDITORIUM
7:30 P.M.
Tickets on sale at
Union main desk and Follett's
$1.00

s

I

1

So.Go.CoCinem qil
TONIGHT at 7 and 9:10 Saturday at 7 only-Sunday at 7 and 9
THE QUIET MAN FELLINI'S NIGHTS
COLOR
COLOROF CABIRIA'
with John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, with Giuletta Masina,
Francois Perrier, Franca Marzi
Barry Fitzgerald, Victor McLaglen Academy and Cannes Awards, Venice Grand Prize
ACADEMY AWARD SHORT: LOVES OF FRAN ISTAN
Architecture Auditorium
50 cents

DIAL , NOW
2-6264

SHOWS AT 1:00-3:05
5:10-7:05 and 9:15
FEATURE AT 1:09 -3:15
5:12 -7:15 and 9:25

AUTHENTIC FILMS NEVER BEFORE SHOWN!

Narrated by CLAUDE STEPOENSON Written and Edited by ERWIN LESER
Produced by TORE SJOBERG A MINERVA INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTION
A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE
EXTRAI
SEE COMMANDER SHEPARD'S HISTORY-MAKING FLIGHT
OF AMERICA'S FIRST SPACEMAN
PRESENTED BY MOVIETONE NEWS

i

STARTING
TODAY

11r l
\IMA I

DIAL
5-6290

Youll be mad too There's still time,
however, to get
get ' tickets for either
your tickets soon .pom e-
( . ,f fperormanlce
for the (7:00 and 9:30)
MEN'SGLEECLUB .- Wickets Available 4
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
SPRING CONCERTS at Ad. Bldg. Lobby
3:00-5:00 Friday
Saturday, May 13 and at Hill
at Auditorium Box
SOffice 8:00-Concert
Hill uditoriumb
Capt. Seey time Saturday
ALL SEATS RESERVED-ALL SEATS $1.00

I

3 SHOWS DAILY'
At 12:30, 4:15 and 8 p.m.
Regular Prices Prevail
A MEMORABLE MOTION PICTURE EVENT TO
SALUTE THE CIVIL WAR CENTENNIAL!

I

I

fwi

I

I

now showing

Th

e love story that thrilled milli
in all its sweeping glory!

ons

LET'S MAKE LOVE

Marilyn Monroe
Yves Montand

L--

DAVID O.SEUZNICKS
MARGARET MITCHELLS
ECSTORY Of TI"O" IO-
GIONE WITH THE WINJD
IN A MN

E

II

\I

and the
PAJAMA GAME
Doris Day

k

I

u
IIFI
Dial 6-8416

NOW SHOWING

1961 DRAMA SEASON
TICKETS FOR INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCES
ON SALE TODAY at 10 A.M.
May 16-20 FAYE EMERSON and JOHN BARAGREY
in "The Marriage-Go-Round"
May 23-27 NANCY KELLY in "The Bad Seed"
May 30-June 3 ALBERT DEKKER in "A Touch of the Poet"
June 6-10 LARRY PARKS and BETTY GARRETT
in "Send Me No Flowers"
June 13-17 DONALD COOK in "The Pleasure of His Company

D R ---- -5s- ----

*'It is
Powerful

I

" ts'"' c.

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