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May 05, 1961 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

'S1

This Weekend in Sports
-FRIDAY
BASEBALL-Michigan vs. Ohio State, at Columbus
TENNIS-Michigan-Purdue-Ohio State, at Columbus
SATURDAY
BASEBALL-Michigan vs. Indiana, at Bloomington (2)
TENNIS-Michigan-Purdue-Ohio State, at Columbus
GOLF-MichiganIllinois-Northwestern, at Evanston
FOOTBALL-Annual Spring Game in Michigan Stadium,
pm.

_i

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Tigers Rap Nats, 6-0, Remain in First

r

....

-_-- -

- I

WELCOME

0

By The Associated Press

Y

MAN in #$tk
by MIKE GILLMAN

SCATTERED points of view from the dugout steps: Ask Michigan
baseball coach Don Lund what's the biggest problem facing the
college coach in recruiting baseball players to the campus and he
has s ready reply.
sWe're looking for the type of player who has professional poten-
tial and we run into professional competition-at least that's my
problem."
While constantly engaged in this battle with pro scouts over
promising prep school material, the continual activities of these talent
'hunt6rs beating the bushes of the hinterlands does not always hurt
the college coach.
Lundo points out that often some of the major league scouts have
been good, about giving him iniformation on players that the college
coach hasn't had an opportunity to see. He says that this co-operation
is:especially apparent when the scouts know that the boys have al-
ready decided to go to college and won't sign with the pros in the
near future.
Only once, says Lund, has he been given a deliberate "bum steer"
by a major league scout (whom he left charitably anonymous).
ON OCCASION even, scouts will recommend a player to college if
he has some degree of potential, but not enough for the pros at
the present time. In this way the colleges can act as a farm team or
tryout setup for the professionals-lettinig them get a better view of
the player without having to invest either time or money in him.
While football and basketball players are generally recruited after
college, baseball is unique in that quite often high school is the ter-
minal point in a player's education as he jumps directly into the pros.
Lund points to the "growing up process' that college play provides
that isn't available when the 18-year-old inks a professional contract.
"Most 'boys don't realize how dog-eat-dog professional ball is.
In college a boy can have a bad week-go home to mother-get a good
,meal-go back to play again. In the pros, you have a bad week in
the spring and you can-be released."
In signing from college, Lund feels that the economic position
of the inidividual involved plays a big part in his decision. The com-
bination of "big money" and poor circumstances can make the big
difference.
Although a former pro himself, Lund notes that more big leaguers
are making $10,000 a year than are in the big brackets. "What's
$10,000 today?" asks Lund. "And even that is just for the "Big
Leaguer'
ON "CARRY-OVER" value of other sports: Lund, although strictly
a baseball coach, is not one to restric his players to a single sport.
In marked contrast to such one-sport disciplinarians as Mrs. Jean
Hoxie,. the Hamtramck tennis coach who demands that her pupils
stay out of other sports, Lund encourges such play.
He notes that a football player who is called on to kick a field
goal in the .dying minutes of the game before 80,000 people gets valu-
able experience in pressure play that carries over to baseball season
when he faces a 3-2 pitch with the bases loaded in the ninth inning.
While he admits that participting in earnest in a sport such as
swimming could develop the wrong muscles, he points out that play-
ing football, basketball, tennis, baseball, etc. all develop commonly-
needed muscles, such as those in the legs.
Lund feels that there is definite carry-over value ini pressure sit-
cations, competitive play and physical development.
* * S
O N HIGH SCHOOL coaching: One. of the most interesting comments
on the baseball scene that Lund makes concerns high school
coaching..
Hie flatly says that in all too many instances prep athletes get
good football and basketball coaching, but poor-quality baseball
coaching. Lund says the blame for this, rests with no-one, coaches or
school administrators, but is a result of economics.
To put it bluntly: football and basketball bring money in-base-
ball just spends it. For this reason, high school coaches (whose jobs
depend more on football than anything else, as a rule) are willing to
go tp clinics and learn new techniques in football and basketball, but
can't even be approached for purposes of baseball training.
THE hitting vs. feilding confroversy: When you see college base-
ball games often decided by multi-run margins, you seldom think
of college ball as a defensive game. But LUnd's viewpoint is that he
would rather have good fielders than hitters (of course the best bet
is to have both).
The former major league outfielder says, "You don't see .400 hit-
ters any more, but you still do have guys who field 1.000. Hitting
fluctuates, while fielding is constant.
"More games are won or lost on defensive lapses than by batting."
Anyone need an after-dinner speaker? Whether or not he wins
the Big Ten championship that his team is now hot on the trail of,
he'll always be able to top the banquet and bicarbonate circuit.

Joey Jay pitched a one-hit shut-
out, allowing only two men to
reach base, as the Cincinnati Reds
beat Philadelphia 4-0 last night
in the National League.
Detroit retained a first-place
tie with New York for the Ameri-
can League lead as Don Mossi shut
out the Washington Senators on
two singles 6-0.
The Yankees defeated Minneso-
ta 5-2 in an afternoon game with
buddies Whitey Ford and Mickey
Mantle once again doing the Job
as New York made it seven vic-
tories in the last eight games.
Los Angeles led Baltimore 3-1
after 3%/ innings.
Giants Lead
San Francisco padded its Na-
tional League lead to a full game
over idle Pittsburgh by whipping
the Chicago Cubs 9-3. Milwaukee
beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 10-6
on Joe Adcock's grand slam hom-
er in the 10th inning in the only
other game scheduled.
Jay, who had lost his first three
decisions for the Reds, gave up a
one-out single to Johnny Callison
in the first inning. Ruben Amaro
drew the lone walk allowed by the
young right-hander, who struck
out seven. Gordie Coleman drove
in three of the Reds' runs off
loser Art Mahaffey as the Reds
scored twice in the first and added
two more in the third.
Mossi Superb
Mossi had a no-hitter until
Gene Green singled with two out

in the seventh. The only other hit
off the left-handed veteran, who
won his third in a row, was a two-
out single in the ninth by Willie
Tasby. The Tigers collected 10 hits
off loser Benny Daniels (0-3) and
two relievers. Norm Cash was 3-
for-4. Billy Bruton, who drove in
two runs, and Al Kaline each had
a triple.
Mantle, leading the majors in
homers and runs batted in, slam-
med his ninth homer and a single
and drove in two runs for a sea-
son total of 24 that helped left-
hander Ford gain his fourth
straight victory after a season-
opening loss to the Twins.
Ford Hampered
Ford, hampered by a cold, beg-
ged off after allowing two runs
and five hits in six innings and
reliever Jim Coates put down
Minnesota on one hit in the last
three innings. The Yanks had all
they needed after scoring three
runs off loser Jim Kaat in the
first inning, one scoring on a sin-
gle by Mantle that extended his
hitting streak through 16 games.

The Twins now have lost six of
their last seven games.
Sam Jones, in winning his third
in four decisions, settled down
after allowing the Cubs three first
inning runs-and permitted only
two hits in the last eight innings.
Trade
LOS ANGELES (P)-The Los
Angeles Dodgers yesterday trad-
ed infielder Charlie Smith and
outfielder Don Demeter to Phil-
adelphia for relief pitcher Dick
Farrell and infielder Joe Kop-
pe.
Koppe will report to the
Dodgers' Spokane, Wash., farm
club in the Pacific Coast
League.
Demeter is 25, Smith 23 and
Farrell 27.
Orlando Cepeda hammered in
three runs while Willie Mays and
Jim Davenport each had three hits
for the Giants, who put it away
with a five-run burst against los-
er Glen Hobbie in the sixth in-

e

ning. Cepeda and Ed Bailey each
drove in two runs in the big frame.
Adcock Connects
Adcock connected for the eighth
bases-loaded homer of his career
to cap a five-run 10th for the
Braves in a 3 hour, 44 minute
marathon with Los Angeles.
The Braves scored two runs for
a 4-4 tie in the eighth, each team
scored a run in the ninth, and Gil
Hodges-hitting his 354th career
homer-gave the Dodgers a 6-5
lead in the tenth before Adcock
and co. broke through against re-
liever Jim Golden. Ed ,Mathews
singled in the run that made it
6-6 before Adcock banged his No.
2 home run into the right field
bleachers.

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NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
San Francisco 12 7 .632 -
Pittsburgh 10 7 .588 1
Milwaukee 8 7 .533 2'
Los Angeles 11 10 .524 2
Cincinnati 10 10 .500 21A
Chicago 9 10' .474 3
St. Louis -8 10 .444 311
Philadelphia Y 6 13 .316 6
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 9, Chicago 3
Milwaukee 10, Los Angeles 6 (10 inn.)
Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 0
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Philadelphia (N)
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh (N)
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (N)
Chicago at St. Louis (N)

S
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Vi, k, .
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AMERICAN

LEAGUE
W L Pct.

C

Detroit 12 5 .706
New York 12 5 .706
Cleveland 10 8 .556
Minnesota 10 9 .5263
x-Baltimore 9 9 .500
Kansas City 7 8 .4674
Boston 7 9 .438
Chicago 7 9 .4384
x-Los Angeles 5 10 .333 6
Washington 6 13 .3161
x-Playing night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 5, Minnesota 2
Detroit 6, Washington 0
Los Angeles 3, Baltimore 1 (4th)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Chicago (N)
New York at Los Angeles
Washington at Cleveland (N)
Boston at Minnesota
Baltimore at,Kansas City (N)

3
31/
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