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April 26, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-26

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

Opposing Laotian Forces Agree
To Ceasefire; No Date Specified

Official Says U.S. Hv
Truth Before Invasi(

Senate Unit

CONGO CONFERENCE:
Tshombe Walkout Ends Hope of Unity

Clears Ilan
On Trading
WASHINGTON (R )-The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee yes-
terday approved President John F.
Kennedy's request for authority
to extend financial and economic
aid to Iron Curtain countries to
/help them loosen Moscow's con-
trol.
The legislation would amend a
law which puts curbs on aid to
countries dealing with Soviet Rus-
sia..It was proposed in Kennedy's
state of the union message and in
a subsequent appeal to Senate and
House -leaders.
The committee acted after
George W. Ball, undersecretary of
state for economic affairs, said,
the principal aim at this time is to
enable Kennedy to use United
States-held Polish currency to
help Poland with projects "which
will demonstrate our abiding.
friendship and interest in the peo-
ple of Poland."
Voice Vote
The legislation was approved by
voice vote, but Sen. John J. Wil-
liams (R-Del) asked to be record-
ed against it.
Kennedy, while a member of
the Senate, fought for legislation
wlhich would give the President
discretionary authority to move in
with help to Soviet Russia's east-
ern European satellites whenever
it might bolster, those countries
in any efforts to become less de-
pendent on Moscow.
The legislation once failed by
the margin of a single vote in .
the Senate, but that body finally
passed it Sept. 12, 1959. However,
the House failed to act.
Previous Approval
Chairman J. William Fulbright
(D-Ark) reminded Ball that the
Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee had approved the legislation
twice before and said the admin-
istration should have sought pas-
sage by the House first at this
session:
"This committee has spoken, in-
sofar as I am concerned," Ful-
bright said. "This is the last time
we are going to pass it if you can't
get it through the House."
Demand Might
Impair Talks
SOn-Test Ban.

COQUILHATVILLE, The Congo
015-President Moise Tshombe of
Katanga stalked out of a meeting
of the Congo's anti-Communist
leaders yesterday, ending at least
temporarily hopes of a Congolese
confederation.
Tshombe accused President Jo-
seph Kasavubu of the Leopoldville
Central Government of selling out
the Congolese people to the United
Nations.
Tshombe said he would refuse
further cooperation and discus-
sion with the central government
until Kasavubu denounces the ac-
cord he recently concluded with
the UN command.
Tshombe's chief objection ob-
viously was to the agreement's
call for immediate withdrawal of
all foreign advisers not under
Kasavubu's authority.
This seemed aimed at the large
number of Belgian advisers and
white mercenary officers in
Tshombe's Katanga army.
Tshombe and all other factions
in the Congo, except Antoine Gi-
zenga's leftist Stanleyville regime,
agreed last month at the Tanan-
arive Round Table Conference on
Congress Backs
Iennedy Wage Bill
WASHINGTON (P) - Senate-
House conferees on the minimum
wage bill today agreed essentially
to take provisions of the Senate
bill as desired by President John
F. Kennedy.
Leaders of the two delegations
declined to go into details although
Rep. Adam C. Powell (D-NY),
elected as chairman of the con-
ference, did tell newsmen agree-
ment had been reached on about
three-fourths of the measure.
A final agreement probably willa
not be announced until this week.
Congress would vote on the com-
promise legislation next week. The+
Senate is to act first.

the principle of a confederation of
Congolese states.
Leopoldville Premier Joseph Ileo
and other leaders at the confer-
ence made no attempt to answer
when Tshombe stipulated three
conditions for his continued par-
ticipation at the Coquilhatville
conference:
1. A denunciation of the Kasa-
vubu-UN agreement.
2. A protest to the UN against
what he called an attack on Ka-
tanga forces by UN Ethiopian
troops at Kabalo in northern Ka-
tanga.
3. An agreement that only those!
who participated in the Tananar-
ive conference have seats at Co-I
quilhatville. This was directed at
Tshombe's longtime enemy, Jason
Sendwe, leader of rebellious Balu-
ba tribesmen in North Katanga.

MOISE TSHOMBE
. . .quits talks

U.S. To Put Man into Space
Despite. Launching Fail ure

CAPE CANAVERAL (P) - Any
Atlas rocketing an unmanned Mer-
cury capsule toward orbit veered
off course and was destroyed yes-
terday, but United States Space
Agency officials said this would
not delay the launching of Amer-
ica's first space man, expected
next Tuesday.
Nor will the spectacular failure
prevent the United States from
placing a man in orbit before the
end of the year. said Robert Gil-
ruth, Director of Project Mercury
for the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration.
Next week's scheduled firing is
to launch a space pilot on a
suborbital flight which will take
him 115 miles up and 300 miles
down range in 16 minutes. A
smaller Redstone Rocket will be
used for this mission.

world News Roundup

The 3,000 pound Mercury cap-
sule was blasted away from the
Atlas booster seconds before the
explosion and was recovered un-
damaged.
"We are confident a man in the
capsule could have survived," Gil-
ruth said. "This will in no way
change our plan to stay with the
Atlas as a booster for manned or-
bit launchings."
The explosion came 40 seconds
after the Atlas was fired at 11:15
a.m. Chunks of blazing metal
showered ,down on the launching
area arid one of them started a
fire. The capsule parachuted into
the Atlantic Ocean about 35 0 yards
off shore.
Astronaut Donald Slayton, one
of seven chosen for future rides
in space, watched the explosion
from a nearby control center.
Later he told a news conference:
"It was disappointing, of course,
but it was gratifying to see the
way the capsule recovery system
works.
"I have lost no confidence in the
Atlas booster. I gained a great
deal of confidence in the recovery
system."
There was no immediate word
on what caused the Atlas mal-
function. An official reported
merely that the safety officer de-
stroyed it because it was off
course.
Gilruth said the capsule per-
formed successfully both before
and during its brief flight. A
breathing, talking robot, installed
where future astronauts will sit,
continued operaitng during the
seven minutes it took for the
capsule' to parachute into the
ocean, where it was recovered by
helicopter.

Continuation
Of Fighting
Forecasted
Government, Rebels
Say Talks Needed
VIENTIANE (A')-A ceasefire
was accepted yesterday by, the
United States-backed government
and the pro-Communist Pathet
Lao rebels but it appeared fight-
ing will continue for'several days.
Neither side proposed a date for
troops in the field to lay down
their arms.
The government said it will
"await the reaction of our op-
ponents to see if they will make
contact with us."
The Soviet news agency Tass
in a dispatch from Hanoi, Coi-
munist- North Viet Nam, report-
ed Pathet Lao leader Prince Sou-
phanouvong pledged to order his
"armed forces to cease fire
throughout the country." It men-
tioned no date.
Propose Conference
Britain and the Soviet Union,
who proposed the ceasefire, were
sending invitations for a 14-na-
tion conference May 12 in Gene-
va to negotiate for setting up an
independent, neutral Laos.
Both the Pathet Lao and Pre-
mier Boun Oum's govenrment in-
dicated a conference may be nec-
essary even to arrange a cease-
fire.
Foreign Minister Chaos Sop-
saisana told newsmen a site has
not been agreed upon, but indi-
cated he favored the royal capi-
tal of Luang Prabang in the
north.
Friday Meeting
Neutralist ex-Premier Souvan-
na Phouma proposed all factions
meet Friday in Xieng Khouang,
in rebel-held northeastern Laos,
for discussions on enlarging the
government. Souphanouvong said
he was ready to send a delegation
but there was no immediate reac-
tion in Vientiane.
Souvanna, recognized by the
Pathet Lao and the Communist
bloc as Laos' legal premier, said
in North Viet Nam he considers
indispensable the formation of an
"enlarged provisional coalition
government" to rule Laos.
It was not known whether he
and the Pathet Lao leaders con-
sidered formation of a coalition
government a prerequisite for a
ceasefire.
Royal officials said fighting
continues in north and south-cen-
tral Laos.-But none of the clashes
appeared serious to Western ob-
servers.
Economics Minister Ngon San-
anikone said rebel troops, who
opened a strong drive over the
weekend, have been halted at Ban
Vang, 68 miles north of Vientiane.
He said Vang Vieng, a key gov-
ernment military headquarters, is
in a no-mans-land between rebel
and royal forces.

WASHINGTON (M) - A top
United States official said yester-
day the Central Int lligence
Agency correctly reported the Cas-
tro regime's military power and
the temper of the Cuban people
before President John F. Ken-
nedy okayed the anti-Castra in-
vasion.
This statement clashed with
views previously expressed by a
number of administration authori-
ties that intelligence errors ccn-
tributed heavily to the failure of
last week's landing attempt.
The contention of those critical
of the CIA was that it consider-
ably underestimated the strength
of Castro's military forces and
over-stated the prospects of a
popular uprising against the Cas-
tro government. The invaders were
badly beaten and the hoped-for
uprisings did not take place.
The conflicting opinions voiced
by well-placed authorities indi-
cated Kennedy's inquiry into the
intelligence set-up is likely to run
into a welter of arguments. As an
BULLETIN
A Detroit newspaper has
closed that Allen Dulles,
head of the CIA is the top
official that revealed the in-
formation.
aftermath of the Cuban fiasco,
Kennedy named Gen. Maxwell D.
Taylor, former Army chief of
staff, to head the inquiry.
The authorities who have dis-
cussed the intelligence record on
Cuba, have declined to permit use
of their names.
House Passes.
Latin Aid Bill
WASHINGTON (R)-The House
yesterday voted the $600 million
requested by President John F.
Kennedy to launch a long-term
aid program for Latin America.
The 330-82 ,vote sending the
measure to the Senate came after
a debate criticizing the bill for not
being explicit.
But the House rejected an at-
tempt by Rep. H. R. Gross (R-
Iowa) to eliminate all but $100
million earmarked for earthquake
relief in Chile.

According to the official w
gave his view today:
The CIAehad correctly analy2
what was going on in Cuba a
the strength of the Castro regir
Quite accurate information K
sent the White House on 1) t
general situation in Cuba, 2)
the number of resistance tor
there, 3) What Prime Minis
Fidel Castro had in his army,
force and navy, and 4) the ge
eral temper of 'the country.
This informant also discuss
the CIA intelligence on the insi
rection by French generals inE
geria. A high official yesterd

AixonAsk'
CIA Change
WASHINGTON -) - Former
Vice-President Richard M. Nixon
is reported to have recommended
to President John F. Kennedy a
shakeup in the Central Intelligence
Agency to separate its spying and
direct action functions.
The Washington Star said Mon-
day Nixon made these recom-
mendations on his White House
visit last Friday. At the same
time, the newspaper said, the for-
mer Vice-President expressed be-
lief some legal means must be
found to deal with Communist
subversion in Cuba and else-
where.
Nixon reportedly added his
promise that he would do what
he could to help Kennedy win
favorable public reaction if the
President decides to take strong
actionas a result of intelligence
shortcomings in connection with
the ill-starred Cuban invasion ef-
fort.
Work of the super-secret CIA is
believed to fall roughly into two
categories. One is the straight in-
formation-gathering, job carried
on by its own agents and through
many other means, including the
use of paid informers.
The other is the training of men
for behind-the-lines work, includ-
ing sabotage and assassination,
such as was carried out in World
War II by the Office of Strategic
Services. OSS was absorbed into
the CIA when the latter was form-
ed after the war.

vho
zed
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me.
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the
on
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ter
air
en-
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ur-
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lay

l
l
l
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had said the United State
been caught by surprise.
Yesterday's informant sa;
United States government h
shortage of information th,
French generals were disp
with the policies of Pre
Charles de Gaulle.
Discuss Plai
For Embar
WASHINGTON (M)-High
ed States officials have disc
possibility of slamming a totE
bargo on trade with Cuba
have reached no decision
White House said yesterday.
Press Secretary Pierre Sa
said the discussions have cor
ed only commerce betweer
country and Castro Cuba,
as far as he knows, hav(
touched on the possibility
blockade of Cuba.

GENEVA (/P) -- The Soviet
Union insisted yesterday on a veto
demand that threatens to wreck
the three-power nuclear test ban
conference.
Soviet delegate Semyon K. Tsar-
apkin referred to his proposal that
the test ban control system be
administered by a three-man
council of one Westerner, one
Communist and one neutral. ,Its
decisions would have to be unan-
imous, thus giving the Communists
a veto.
He told Arthur H. Dean of the
United States and Britain's Sir
Michael Wright that the Soviet
government "simply cannot ac-
cept" the Western view that the
system be headed by a single, ad-
ministrator.
Tsarapkin told the twoWestern
delegates they have alreatiy ac-
cepted the idea of tripartite staff-
ing in practically every other
phase of the control organization,
and the Soviet Union was not in-
clined to give way.
He described as groundless the!
Western argument the Soviet pro-
posal is tantamount to a new veto
demand. He said the administra-
tive triumvirate was necessary be-
cause all three nuclear powers
must be represented in the ad-
ministrative management of the
control system.
Tsarapkin avoided Sir Michael's
question however on how precise-
ly this triumvirate should decide
on control operations by acting as
a single whole.

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By The Associated Press
NEW YORK -A consensus of
Wall Street brokers believe that
Monday's price tumble-deepest in
seven months-was triggered al-
most entirely by the Algerian
crisis, and will recover immedi-
ately.
They cited yesterday's partial
comeback as evidence that the
market is still strong,
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee yes-
terday approved President John
F. Kennedy's noihination of Julius
C. Holmes to be ambassador to
Iran. The vote was 12-4.
Holmes has been under attack
by Sen. John J. Williams (R-Del),,
and others for his association 14
years ago with quick profit deals
in surplus government oil tankers.
* * *
WASHINGTON-President Ken-
nedy yesterday signed a bill which
makes Vice-President Lyndon B.
Johnson, instead of the President,
chairman of the National Aero-
nautics and Space Council. The
council is the policy making group
for all space activities, military
and civilian.
* * *
WASHINGTON - Rigged prices
drew double-notice in the Capital
yesterday,
President John F. Kennedy
aimed a blow at them, and Sena-
tors heard testimony linking, a
former General Electric president
with the illegal meetings that fixed
them.
Kennedy's action came in an ex-
ecutive .order directing all agencies
to report to the Justice Depart-
ment all identical bids they receive
on government contracts worth
more than $10,000.
* * *
WASHINGTON-April brought
an increase in the number of
smaller areas suffering from sub-
stantial unemployment, the gov-
ernment reported yesterday.
The report led Secretary of La-

bor Arthur J. Goldberg to observe
that "we are still not out of the
woods" on the unemployment
problem.
S* * *
LONDON - Soviet Premier Ni-
kita Khrushchev has accepted an
invitation to visit Morocco, Mos-
cow radio said last night.
It said: "Khrushchev and the
king of Morocco will exchange of-
ficial visits. Details of the visits
will be agreed through diplomatic
channels."
* * *
NEW YORK-Arthur Hay Sulz-
berger retired yesterday as pub-
lisher of the New York Times, a
post he has held since 1935. He
will continue as chairman of the
board.

B'NAI B'RITH H I LLEL FOUNDATION
Final lecture by
Dr. Gerhard L. Weinberg
Assoc. Prof. of History
in series
"Notional Socialism and the Jews"
"The Impact on the Persecutors
RABBI MAX KAPUSTIN,
Hillel Director at Wayne State University,
will supplement with observations on his
recent visit to West Germany.

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