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April 25, 1961 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 1961

Bronco Nine Faces Wolverines

SPRING FOOTBALL:
Team Shapes Up
Under Elliott 's Eye

'I

By GARY GUSSIN
With last Friday's Big Ten vic-
tory over Minnesota under its belt,
Michigan's version of the 1927
Yankees will play host to the
Western Michigan Broncos at 3:30
p.m. today at Ferry Field.
The Broncos will be the first
of three state teams the Wolver-
ines will face in the next seven
days. Friday they meet Michigan
Sae in a single game here, fol-
lowed by a, twin bill against the
Spartans Saturday in East Lans-
ing.
Next Tuesday, Dave DeBussch-
ere and the Detroit Titans will
come to Ann Arbor in an attempt
to avenge a 10-8 loss at the hands
of the Wolverines last year.
On Win Streak
Possessors of a four-game win-
streak and a 10-3 record for the
season, Michigan has thus far
shown power reminiscent of the

f a m e d Yankees' "Murderers'
Row."
The Wolverine edition has wal-
loped a total of 18 homers in 13
games thus far-including two last
Friday against Minnesota's star
pitcher, Howard Nathe.
The task of silencing the thun-
derous Wolverine bats today will
fall on the shoulders of Western's
veteran pitcher Bill Ortleib. Ac-
cording to Michigan Coach Don
Lund, Ortleib was "a real fine
pitcher for them two years ago,
but for some reason was not in
school last year."
Undefeated Hurler
Ortleib is undefeated so far this
year, and the Broncos are unde-
feated (5-0) in Mid-America Con-
ference competition.
The fact that Western Michigan
is not a large school does not
mean they will be pushovers. Last

AT OSU QUADRANGULAR MEET:
Katzenmeyer Pleased with Victory

year they battled Lund's crew to
an 8-8, 13-inning draw.
With 12 returning lettermen,
the Broncos should be especially
tough this year. They are led by
Captain Frank Quilici who was an
all-district shortstop last year,
who was also named to the sec-
second-team All-America.
Included in Western's lineup
will be an Ann Arbor-grown out-
fielder, Ken Scodeller, who un-
doubtedly will have special rea-
sons for helping his mates humble
the Wolverines. (He probably will
be a little more experienced at
fence-hurdling than was the Go-
phers' Roland Larson.)
Lund plans to go with sopho-
more southpaw F r i t z Fisher
against the Broncos. He'd like
Fisher to go "at least five innings,"
but hopes to give Mike Joyce and
Bob Marcereau a chance to pitch
as well.
Determining Factor
The determining factor will be
how well the Wolverines are do-
ing at the time.
According to Lund, "They're a
good ball-club and we want to
beat them. If we get a good lead,
then we can experiment, but if it's
close, we won't be able to do much
switching around."
Actually, the biggest hope is
that the "Ann Arbor fog" will
let up long enough to give the
team a -chance to play before the
weekend's encounters with the
Spartans, which marks a return to
Big Ten play after an eight day
lull as a result of the postpone-
ment of Saturday's double-header'
with Iowa. The Michigan State
series opens here on Friday after-
noon, and moves to East Lansing
for a big Saturday twin-bill. The
Wolverines are in a first place tie
with OSU and Indiana at this
point. A winning weekend would
put the team in a good position for
the bulk of the season.

By GEORGE WANSTALL

said Katzenmeyer In describing
Newcomb's fine score.
"Dick also did very, very well,"
commented Katzenmeyer on Dick
Youngberg, whose 75 was a mere
one stroke below his nearest op-
ponent, Ohio State's Jack Nick-
laus, U.S. Amateur Champion.
Katzenmeyer, in spite of Mich-
igan's upset victory in a meet
that for the past three years has
ended with the Wolverines in
fourth position, was still not com-
pletely satisfied with his team.
"I think an important thing is
that none of the boys are satis-
fied yet with their games. They all
realize that they still have prob-
lems, and they are more determin-
ed than ever to solve them," he
said.
Important Stroke
"Another thing the boys are be-
ginning to realize is the impor-
tance of a. single stroke," Katzen-
meyer said in looking at the close
460 to 461 victory over Ohio State,
the next lowest team.
Naturally, with the Michigan
victory over Purdue, OSU, and In-

diana which ended up first, second
and fifth respectively in last year's
conference meet, Katzenmeyer is
thinking ahead to the Big Ten
meet at Bloomington this year.
Tough Competitors
"From what we saw Saturday,
both Purdue and Ohio State are
both going to be good golf teams,"
said Katzenmeyer.
"Of course Minnesota is also go-
ing to be tough," he continued.
"They are a strong fundamental
team, and last year with a bunch'
of sophomores and juniors they
ended up fourth in the conference,
and this year they'll all be a year
older."
However, with this victory Sat-
urday, Katzenmeyer sees a fine
future for his Michigan team.

With less than two weeks re-
maining until the May 6 final
intra-squad scrimmage in the
Michigan Stadium, each 'M' grid-
der is struggling with his individ-
ual problems to assure him a slot
on the final team roster in Sep-
tember.
In the meantime, the coaching
staff is surveying these improve-
ments in the small scrimmages
held already. Saturday's scrim-
mage was held under limited con-
ditions with touchdown runs were
whistled down,
This game gave the mentors a
pretty good picture of the team
as a whole, both its strengths,
and more obviously its weaknesses.
'Bump' Elliott and company are
generally pleased, certainly plag-
ued with perennial problems but
not overly concerned with them.
Line coach Bob Holloway speaks
SPORT SHORTS:
Reveal Plan
On All-Stars
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-An eight-point
program to bring college all-star
football and basketball games un-
der control of the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association was
unveiled yesterday by the NCAA
council.
The 18-member council recom-
mended, among other things, that
such contests be limited to char-
ity affairs, squads limited to sen-
iors and seniors limited to one
all-star contest.
The council also supported a
motion to allow each prospective
college athlete to list his choice
of school with the NCAA. Then he
could not be approached by any
other member college.
* * *
Sportswriters and sportscasters
in the six National Hockey League
cities yesterday revealed their
selections for the 1960-61 All-Star
team.
Half of the first team, right
winger Bernie "Boom Boom"
Geoffrion, defenseman Doug Har-
vey, and center Jean Beliveau,
were from the regular-season
champion Montreal Canadians.
Second-place Toronto rated two
first team players, goalie Johnny
Bower and left-winger Frank Ma-
hovlich. Detroit's defenseman
Marcel Pronovost rounded out the
first team.

of limited line depth, and Elliott
hopefully of sufficient ranks to
fill all three of his platoons which
performed so successfully last sea-
son.
Concerning the line prospects,
Holloway seems quite optimistic,
listing several returning letter-
men who, thus far, have either
played as expected or with marked
improvements. His greatest plea-
sure was an increase in pound-
age in both offensive and defen-
Sports Writers!
Interested in writing about
your favorite sports for the fin-
est college newspaper in the
country? Come to The Michigan
Daily at 7:30 p.m. Sunday for
an important. introductory
meeting with the Sports staff,
Dr contact Cliff Marks at NO
2-3241, or NO .5-6922.
sive lines which was initiated
without a sacrifice in speed and
mobility, two musts in perform-
ance.
Among those entering 1961
competition slightly heavier are
tackles John Houtman (246); and
Jon Schopf (228). At guard Lee
Hall has added weight.
"Speaking ofthe line," said Hol-
loway, "don't forget Phil Garri-
son and Tom Keating. They have
shown some real promise as
tackles." The ends are shaping up
well, as expected. George Mans,
Scott Maentz, and Bob Brown re-
turn, while Doug Bickle is fast
becoming varsity caliber.
Elliott noted that Bob Chand-
ler will be a doubtful starter at
the quarterback slot, due to his
knee injury sustained in the Mich-
igan State game, last year. Jim
Ward, Ken Tureaud and Ed Hood,
all victims of injuries last sea-
son, should be in top condition as
backfield performers.
Elliott has been pleased with
his strong-running fullbacks and
with the backfield as a whole,
which should provide needed bal-
ance to the new line.

.M' Tracksters Training
For Remaining Meetings

By JAN WINKELMAN
"Things went about as we ex-
pected them to go."
This was track coach Don Can-
ham's comment on Michigan's
fine performance at the Annual
Ohio Relays held last Saturday
at Columbus. Although no official
team points were kept, Michigan
was far and away the best of the
field.
"The team had expected a great
deal of competition from Western
Michigan," commented Canham.
Western Michigan was the pre-
meet favorite in the Two Mile Re-
lay. The Michigan combination of
Charlie Aquino, Wally Schafer,
Dave Martin, and Ergas Leps,
however, had no difficulty win-
ning the race.
No Favorites
"This just goes to show," re-
marked Canham, "that there is
no such thing as a pre-meet fa-
vorite. Luck and weather rule out
the existence of a definite pre-
meet shoo-in."
Neither Western Michigan nor
Purdue were strong enough to
seriously compete against the Wol-
verines. The trackmen took four
first places in the relays, and
shotputter Ray Locke bettered his
best indoor heave with a -54' 81/4"
toss to win another event for the
Wolverines.
Robinson Back
Tom Robinson, who did not com-
pete in the Ohio Relays because
lajor League
StLandings

of a sore back, has been working
out as usual after responding to
treatment.
"The team is in good shape for
next weekend," said Canham.
With the team at full strength
they will be at a disadvantage,
though. The reason being that
finals in both the 440-yd. and
sprint medley Relays will be held
at approximately the same time
Saturday. The same, unforu-
nately, is true of the Four Mile
and Distance Relays.
Canham must decide whether to
enter all four, or pull teams in
these events. As evidenced by the
fine showing at Columbus, Can-
ham's possible combinations of
runners are numerous.

Big Ten

Standings

W L Pet
Indiana 3 0 1.000
Ohio State 1 0 1.000
MICHIGAN 1 0 1.000
Northwestern 2 1 .667
Minnesota 2 1 .667
Wisconsin 1 2 .33:
Michigan State 1 2 .333
Iowa 0 1 .004
Illinois 0 1 .000
Purdue 0 3 .000
Saturday's Results
Indiana 19-3, Purdue 2-2
Michigan and Iowa (rain)
Illinois and Ohio State (rain)
Minnesota 5-3, Michigan State 3-0
Northwestern 4-7, Wisconsin 3-6

10
i7
13
10
10

_
!

-, i

BILL NEWCOMB
... leads linksmen
NCAA Probes
College Hockey
WASHINGTON P) - The Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion's policy-making committee
met yesterday to begin a probe
into suspected professionalism in
college hockey.
A special committee has been
appointed by the NCAA executive
board to study the dominance of
Canadian hockey players in inter-
collegiate hockey in this country.
Walter Byers, executive direc-
tor, reported that for the past
two years an influx of Canadian
players into United States colleges
has become a problem. .
The executive committee yes-
terday tabled any action on the
sites of future ice hockey tourna-
ments until a report is received
from the special committee, due
at a meeting in Seattle, Washing-
ton, Aug. 17-18.
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.

0

NATIONAL'

LEAGUE
W L Pet.

in a lecture
"OUR AGE - an
Aesthetic
vacuum"

GB

Los Angeles 8 5 .615 -
San Francisco 6 5 .545 1
St. Louis 6 5 .545 1
Pittsburgh 6 5 .545 1
Chicago 5 6 .455 2
Cincinnati 5 6 .455 2
Milwaukee 3 4 .429 2
Philadelphia 4 7 .364 3
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 7, Milwaukee 6
Only game scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Los Angeles (N)
Milwaukee at St. Louis (N)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (N)
Cincinnati at Chicago
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Detroit 8 1 .889 -
x-Minnesota 7 2 .778 1
Cleveland 6 4 .600 2.
New York 5 4 .556 3
Boston 4 4 .500 3V2
Chicago 4 5 .444 4
x-Kansas City 2 4 .333 4
Baltimore 3 6 .333 5
Washington 3 6 .333 5
Los Angeles 1 7 .125 6f

8

May 14

.. 7:30

1
J
1
3
l
l

B

I.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 4, New York 3
Cleveland 5, Baltimore 1
Los Angeles at Chicago (rain)
Minnesota at Kansas City (inc.)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Detroit
Cleveland at Baltimore (N)
Minnesota at Kansas City (N)
Washington at Boston
Los Angeles at Chicago (N)
II

Hill Auditorium
Tickets $1.00
On Sale
Tomorrow

Suits-Sportcoats-Slacks

I

11



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