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April 13, 1961 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ti

Wings Tie Series with 2-1 Win

it

II

Major League Standings

11

AMERICANl

MacGregor
Gets Winning
Detroit Tally
By The Associated Press
DETROIT (P)-Bruce MacGre-
gor, a 19-year-old rookie less than
two months out of the minor
leagues, dramatically burst the De-
troit Red Wings back into conten-
tion for the Stanley Cup cham-
pionship last night with a third
period goal that beat the Chicago
Black Hawks 2-1.
The best-of-seven series now is
tied at 2-2.
MacGregor, a red-haired fireball
who received the highest bonus
ever paid a Detroit hockey player,
got the first goal of his National
Hockey League career and It broke
up a tense duel that had a crowd
of 13,975 on its feet much of the
time. ...
Climax
The goal.came with a little less
than seven minutes to play in the
game and. climaxed Detroit's gal-
land bid to square the series.
The Red Wings, who now have
won both- games played on their
own ice and. lost both times on
Chicago ice, outplayed the Hawks
almost from start to finish.
But , Glenn Hall's superlative
goaltending, plus some last-second
heroics by the Hawks' burly de-
fense, turned back many a Detroit
flurry.
Worth Every Penny
The Red Wing front office would
not, disclose how much money
MacGregor got for signing but
Ann Arbor
Rugby Club
Faces Foe
By DAVE GOOD
Michigan's football s e a s o n
doesn't start until next fall, but
fans looking for something a lit-
tle different may be interested in
the home opener of the Ann Arbor
Rugby Club this Saturday.
Made up of nearly 30 graduate
and undergraduate Michigan stu-
dents the club will try to spring
an upset over the Toronto Irish at
2 p.m. on Wines Field.
The locals, who won all four of
their games last fall, have varied
backgrounds to carry into the
sport, which many American ob-
servers have called a compromise
between football and soccer.
Football Players
Jim Orwig, Michigan's 1957
captain at tackle, Harry Newman,
former Wolverine halfback, and
Dave Dingham, one-time Dart-
mouth back, all boast experience
in college football.
Four exchange students are no
strangers to rugby, having taken
up the game in their native lands.
Whata Winiata, captain of his
FENCERS MEET
The Fencing Club will have
its first meeting tonight at 8:00
in the I-M building for all those
interested in the sport.
team at Wellington University in
New Zealand, will act as player-
coach for the club. Terry Robin-
son, of Queens University in
Northern Ireland, will join New-
man and Dingham as top running
backs. Mike Burrows and Terry
Davis, both from the University
of London, will see lots of action.
Forward
Pete Bowman will take one of
the eight forward, or lineman, po-
sitions, and John Niehuss will be
utilized as a place-kicker from
one of the seven backfield spots.

Rugby parallels football in that
the ball can be advanced by run-
ning, and it is similar to soccer
because the ball can be kicked
ahead. It differs from the Ameri-
can game, however, by prohibit-
ing lateral passing.
"Themost interesting aspect of
the game," explained Froncie
Gutman, another of the local
players, "is that there is continu-
ous action." He said that the ball
is always in play, providing rugby
fans with an exciting game to
watch come Saturday.

'GIANTS WIN 2-1:
Hit Batter in Eighth
Defeats Pittsburgh

Chicago
Los Angeles
Minnesota
Cleveland
Kansas City
New York
Detroit
Boston
Washington
Baltimore

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
0 1 .000
0 1 .000
0 1 .000
0 1 .000
0 1 .000
0 1 .000

GB
I'
1
1
1
1

NATIONAL:
Cincinnati
St. Louis
x-Los Angeles
-Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
San Francisco
Chicago
Milwaukee

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
1 1 .500
1 1 .500
0 1 .000
0 1 .000

GB
1
1

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles at Baltimore (rain)
Chicago at Washington (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at New York
Cleveland at Detroit
Kansas City at Boston
Los Angeles at Baltimore
Chicago at Washington

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 2, Philadelphia 2
Philadelphia 1, Los Angeles 0 (at end
of 5 innings)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at San Francisco
Philadelphia at Los Angeles
St. Louis at .Milwaukee

SAN FRANCISCO ('P) -Rookie
manager Alvin Dark gambled and
won with veteran right hander
Billy Loes yesterday as the San9
Francisco Giants' pitcher, who
hadn't started since 1958, beat the
world champion Pittsburgh Pi-
rates 2-1 yesterday.
Pirate hurler Vern Law hit Or-
alndo Cepeda with the bases loaded
to force in the winning run in the
last of the eighth.
Loes worked eight innings, giv-
ing up eight singles before Dark
brought in left hander Billy O'Dell
to start the ninth. The Pirates got
men on first and second with two
out in that final frame after Bob
Skinner singled and Rocky Nelson
walked. Rookie Jim Duffalo re-
lieved O'Dell and got Roberto
Clemente on a grounder for the
final out.
Small Crowd
Pittsburgh opened the scoring in
the sixth. Clemente singled, went
to third on Don Hoak's single and
scored on an infield out.
Rookie catcher Tom Haller, re-
maining alive when Clemente
dropped his foul in right field,
homered for his first major league
hit in the seventh to even the
count at 1-1.
In the eighth, with one out, Har-
vey Kuenn singled to center and
reached third on Willie Mays' sin-
gle. Willie McCovey drew an inten-
tional pass, filling the bases. With
the count one and two on Cepeda,
law hit him on the shoulder and

forced in pinch runner Ernie Bow-
man.
The Pirates made their big bid
in the sixth. Clemente lofted a
high fly back of second that the
wind whipped around. Second
baseman Charlie Hiller misjudged
the ball and it fell for a single.
Hoak singled through the box to
center, his third straight hit, send-
ing Clemente to third.
Clemente scored on Bill Mazer-
oski's grounder. Smokey Burgess
was walked intentionally and Loes
hit Law to fill the bases. Bill Vir-
don, whose homer yesterday nip-
ped the Giants in the ninth, slam-
med a grounder that hit Law for
the automatic third out.
The contest was the only after-
noon affair in either league, with
Philadelphia playing a night game
at Los Angeles. The other sched-
uled games were rained out.
Orioles, A's Trade
BALTIMORE (A - The Balti-
more Orioles last night traded
pitcher Jerry Walker and outfield-
er Chuck Essegian to Kansas City
for pitcher Dick Hall and out-
fielder Dick Williams in a straight
player deal.

U

MARCEL PRONOVOST
...back in action

Delicious Hamburgers...15c
Hot Tasty French Fries...10c
Triple Thick Shakes...20c
2000 WEST STADIUM

nl

the kid was worth every penny of
it last night. His winning goal de-
cided a game that had been dead-
locked by Red Hay's score for Chi-
cago and Alex Delvecchio's goal
for Detroit. Both came in the
second period.
MacGregor's goal followed a
spirited rush in the Chicago end
with the redshirted Detroiters
swarming the net and refusing to
let the Hawks clear the puck.
Defenseman Warren Godfrey,
playing on an injured knee, passed
the puck to Val Fonteyne who was
camped 25 feet to Hall's left. Fon-
teyne fed a short pass to Mac-
Gregor who was at center ice and
the Rookie fired a backhander that
struck Hall's pads and tricksled
across the goal line as Hall toppled
backward into the net.
Detroit's Howie Glover had Hall
partly screened out.
Ends Drought
Hay ended more than 27 minutes
of scoreless, but furious hockey
when he flicked a high shot over
the arm of Detroit goalie Terry
Sawchuck. Hay took a pass from
Bobby Hull at the corner of the.
goal crease and had a simple shot.
Just 74 seconds later-and just
36 seconds after Hull went to the
penalty box for high-sticking
Howie Young-Delvecchio tied the
score.
The goal followed a faceoff to
the left of the Hawk goal. Delvec-
chio tried a slapshot, but Reg
Fleming stopped it.
The puck bounced in the air,
Delvecchio knocked it down with
his gloved hand and let fly with a
40-footer that zoomed under Hall's
leg.
Third Goal
It was the third goal of the series
for Delvecchio, who now is the
leading goalgetter in the Stanley
Cup showdown.
The defeat was a heart-breaking
one for the Hawks, seeking to take
a 3-1 lead in the series on foreign
ice, then go back to friendly Chi-
cago Stadium and wrap up their
first crown since 1938.
But MacGregor was the man of
the hour to give Detroit the chance
to move ahead 3-2 when the teams
meet at the Stadium, resuming
their battle for hockey supremacy.
The Hawks battled hard for the
equalizer last night after Mac-
Gregor's goal, but couldn't beat
Sawchuck.
MERCEDES-
BENZ
Factory authorized sales and serv-
ice. Good selectionsto choose from.
Now taking orders for European
delivery. Be assured of delivery by
placing your order now for the
coming summer.
ARCURE MOTOR SALES
NO 3-3309 617 Detroit St.
Ann Arbor

y

At

NOW OPEN
FOR
LUNCH

Cafe Promethean 508 E. William

I

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S
COMFORTABLE GENTLEMEN
Chart a
Short Course in
Sleeves at half mast are a cheerful sign
today. Even executives in wood panelled
offices have become emancipated from
hot long sleeved shirts. Collar styles in
correct variety are here for choosing.
Button-down
$5.00 and $5.95
Tab Collar $5.00
Regular Collar $4.25
'tStradivari" $7.95
a S WILD'S
noate Street on tho Campus

11

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SCULPTURED ELEGANCE
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11

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