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February 10, 1961 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VESS SCHOOLS:
Educators Need Further Information'

'U' Records
New Goals

41)

,.

PHILIP SHERMAN
:usiness education may
b right now is some good
he relationship of busi-
ation to business careers.
ts have come up with
ommendations for busi-
ation, but their sugges-
considered tentative and
ate by the lack of data
lucation's effect on busi-
Consequently, many bus-
cators may feel they are
in the dark" when they,
ne their operations in
of recent reports on busi-
:ation, Leonard Silk con-
a new pamphlet, "The
a of Businessmen."

Sponsored by the Committee for
Economic Development, Silk ab-
stracted two major reports on bus-
iness education for the pamphlet,
which is intended for wide distri-
bution t~o businessmen and educa-
tors. Dean Floyd A. Bond of the
business administration school,
former director of the CED busi-
ness education division, contrib-
uted the foreword and served as
editor.
Two Surveys
The two surveys: ,a Ford Foun-
dation-sponsored project by Prof,
Robert A. Gordon of the Univer-
sity of California and Prof. James
E. Howell of Stanford University;,
and a Carnegie Corporation work

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by Prof. Frank C. Pierson of
Swarthmore College.
Dean Bond described the prob-
lems connected with the broad
study of businessmen's education
and careers: the problem of find-
ing good criteria of business suc-
cess and of educational back-
ground; the fact business is a
relative new area of study; the
fact courses of instruction change
over time, and are different at dif-
ferent institutions; and a general
looseness of terminology are some
of them. Several organizations
have attempted such research, but
without much success, he added.
It might be possible for the Uni-
versity, with its rich resources, to
attempt such a study, Dean Bond
said. The study might make use
of survey research techniques and
also computers to process large
masses of data.
Totally Lacking
Despite the fact this kind of
information is almost totally lack-
ing, both the Gordon-Howell and
Pierson reports came up with sub-
stantial recommendations for bus-
iness educators. Silk abstracts 11
particular points from the two re-
ports,
(All are qualified by the ad-
mitted lack of information about
the relation of education to busi-
ness success. They apply. most
strongly to business education de-
partment of liberal arts colleges of
which there are over 400 in the
United States. They apply least
to the business schools offering
substantial graduate programs -
such as the University, Harvard
University, and the University of
California.)
1) "Academic standards in some
business schools and departments
must be materially raised."
Admission Requirements
2) "Admission requirements ...
should be increased." Undergradu-
ate business education, particular-
ly in department, has too long
been regarded as a "dumping
ground" for students who can't
make it in other disciplines.
3) "College and university busi-
ness curricula must be pruned to
reduce vocationalism and over-
specialization." This would mean
abolition of such courses as book-
keeping, typing and salesmanship.
4) Non - professional courses
should comprise at least 50 per
cent of undergraduate business
education programs. Students
should be trained for more than
their first job; and analytical abil-
ity, balanced judgment, ability to
communicate an understanding of
contemporary social and economic
forces, all desirable, are partially
the products of a liberal educa-
tion.
Wade To Give
Law Lectures
Prof. H. W. R. Wade of Trinity
College, Cambridge, England will
deliver the 1961 Thomas M, Cooley
lectures at the Law School in Oc-
tober.
Prof. Wade will discuss "Anglo-
American Dilemmas in Adminis-
trative Law" in a series of five
lectures.1
He is currently serving on the
"Relationships Commission" con-
cerned with forming a new con-
stitution for the African nation of
Uganda.

FLOYD A. BOND
... needed information

) 3r2481

314 South State

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5) There should be greater stress
on basics. Despite differences in
allocation of time, both reports
suggest an augmented undergrad-
uate program in mathematics and
statistics, economics and other so-
cial sciences and humanities, a
stripped-down program in func-
tional business subjects and a few
broad courses in business policy,
p r i n c i p l e s and organizational
theory.
6) Graduate master's degree
programs should preferably be two
years long and be oriented profes-
sionally rather than academically.
Each school may have a different
emphasis, but both reports sug-
gest work in the contributions of
quantitative methods, economics,
psychology-sociology and law to
business; one area of management
for specific study; and free elect-
ives in or out of the business
school.
Added Numbers
7) Improvement and expansion
of doctoral programs are the most
-important requirement for im-
provement of business edducation.
This will produce the added num-
bers of able teachers and research-
ers that are needed.'
8) "The quality of business re-
It's now weak, both reports found,
but it could give vitality to the
whole of business education. ,
9) "The focus of business stud-
ies should be upon the application
of scientific knowledge to business
problems; this approach should
provide the urgently needed or-
ganizing concept for business edu-
cation and research." Behavioral
science and quantitative methods
will be stressed, and doctoral pro-
grams will be oriented toward
study of managerial decision-
making.
May Focus
10) A pragmatic, flexible atti-
tude is needed in development of
programs in different schools.
Some schools may, focus on train-
ing for top-management of large
business, others of preparation for
smaller or more specialized opera-
tions. Some schools may empha-
size application of "science" to
business, others may view it as an
"art."
Various combinations of work in
business and non-business sub-
jects will be investigated.
11) Improvement of business
education is closely tied to im-
provement of United States higher
education generally.
The basis for these recommen-
dations is a belief by both Gordon
and Howell, and Uierson, that
many business schools and de-
partments are not properly pre-
paring students for the most use-
ful careers..
Business education is often too
narrow, and sometimes encourages
knowledge of the routine rather
than flexibility and imagination,
I breadth of judgment and creativ-
ity that are primary requisites of
modern managers.
Business is becoming increasing
complex and scientific and this
should be reflected in some means
in business edudcation.
W STUDENTS
MER STUDENTS(
R ALL YOUR
JCESSORISI

[inResearch
(Continued from Page 1
his own ideas with no practical
purpose in mind," Dr. William N.
Hubbard Jr., dean of the Medical
School, explains.
Develops Devices
"While the scientist investigates
physical phenomena for their own'
sake, the engineer is concerned
with the use of the latest scientific
results to develop economical de-
vices of processes of more imme-
diate benefit to mankind," Glenn
V. Edmonson, associate dean of
the engineering school, says.
The office of the vice-president
for research is the agency respon-
sible for the general administra-
tion, but not the specific program,
of the University's research opera-
tion.
"The main concern of the office
of the vice-president for research
is that the faculty benefit and be
aware of all the research opportu-
nities that are available at the
University," Sawyer said.
Maintains Data
The Office of Research Admini-
stration, formerly the University
of Michigan Research Institute,
was established in 1958 as a con-
tinuation of the Engineering Re-
search Institute. ORA is the ad-
ministrative agency for all Uni-
versity research projects, includ-
ing those projects' financed by
agencies outside of the University.
As the administrative agency for
research, it is ORAs job to main-
tain and analyze data on the Uni-
versity's research activities, ac-
cording to Robert E. Burroughs,
ORA director.
Need for an organization that
could do research which cut across
departmental limits, as well as at-
tract prominent scientists to both
the state and University, caused
I the establishment of the Institute
of Science and Technology in
July, 1959. The Institute has since
been expanded to include the Wil-
|low Run Research Laboratories.
"The role of IST is threefold,"
Joseph Boyd, director of the Insti-
tute, writes. It "complements ac-
tivities of departments that cut
across departmental or college
limits, and initiates research in
new fields of interest and provides
some state leadership in the sci-
ence and technological fields as
they relate to the state's industrial
and technological developments.
The Michigan-Memorial Phoenix
Project, created In 1949 as a Me-
morial to the University's war
dead, is d e v o t e d primarily to
peaceful uses developing of atomic
energy.
"The primary purpose of the
Phoenix Project is to support aca-
demic research," Henry J. Gom-
berg, director of the Phoenix Pro-
ject, says. He defines academic re-
"search as "whatever a professor
wants to do within or in extending
his field of activity," although he
noted the Project does tend to
avoid sponsoring applied; indus-
trial research.
Work To Head
Medical School
Department
Dr. Walter P. Work of the Uni-
versity of California has been
named chairman of the Depart-
ment of Otolaryngolory at the
University Medical School effec-
tive July 1.
The Regents approved the ap-
pointment Jan. 28.
Dr. Work will succeed Dr. James
H. Maxwell, who died last June.
Dr. A. C. Furstenberg, dean emeri-
tus of the Medical School, has
been serving as acting chairman
of the department since Dr. Max-

well's death.
Name Jelenik
For Quartet
The Regents have approved the
appointment of Prof. Jerome M.
Jelinek as a member of the fac-
ulty of the School of Music and
as cellist in the Stanley Quartet.
Starting with the fall semester
he will be assistant professor of
violincello and chamber music.
Prof. Jelinek will also replace
Prof. Oliver Edel in the Stanley
Quartet. Prof. Edel, who has been
cellist with the quartet since it
was started in 1949, wished to de-
vote more time to teaching and
research.
Katharine Gibbs
Memorial
Scholarships
Full tuition for one year
plus $500 cash grant
Open to senior women interested in
business careers as assistants to ad-
ministrators and executives.
Outstanding training. Information
now available at the College Place-

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Glass Dies Here;
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Kathryn L. Glass, resident di-
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period.
The 67-year-old resident hall di-
rector, who served 'for 18 years
at the University, was pronounced
dead on arrival at University Hos-
pital.

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