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March 04, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-04

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S961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Congo Leaders Assemble
For Conference on Peace

# ,
1

ti "

Clash Keeps
Leopoldville
In Turmoil

Sudanese Kill One
In Fight at Banana
LEOPOLDVILLE (P) - Fight-
ing erupted yesterday between
United Nations Sudanese troops
and Congolese soldiers in the port
of Banana at the height of new
UN efforts to 'end civil strife in
the Congo.
At least one Congolese soldier
was reported killed and fighting
raged on into the night, despite
orders from both the UN and
Congolese army commands to
cease firing. The Sudanese were
using their new authority from
the UN Security Council to open
fire if necessary to maintain or-
der. . '
With passions already running
high against the UN in Leopold-
ville, it was a discouraging end to
a day that saw the UN make two
more approaches to the leftist
rebels of Antoine Gizenga.
Rebels Get Demand
Rajeshwar Dayal, India's haed
of the UN Congo mission, sent
another formal demand to rebel
authorities in their capital of
Stanleyville to cease all military
movements outside their province
-Oriental.
Gen. Sean McKeown, Irish head
of UN military forces, flew to
Stanleyville for talks with. Gen.
Victor Lundula, the rebel army
commander. McKeown met last
week with Gen. Joseph Mobutu,
the Congo's army commander, in
an attempt to arrange a cease-
fire.
A UN spokesman said the fight-
ing at Banana, a port on the At-
lantic 300 miles west of Leopold-
ville, ,broke out when Congolese
soldiers tried to arrest a UN radio
operator.
UN soldiers intervened, seized
two of the Congolese and started
to return them to the Congo army
barracks. Other Congolese soldiers
began shooting and the Sudanese
returned the fire, the spokesman
said.

Leftist Head
Not Included
At Meeting
Gizenga's Absence
Clouds Truce Hopes
ELISABETHVI-LEJ()-Congo-
lese leaders assembled here last
night for a flight today to a peace
conference on Madagascar. $ut
the absence of the leftist rebel,
Antoine Gizenga, clouded pros-
pects of a peaceful settlement in
the troubled Congo.
All the anti-Communist Con-
go regimes will be represented, a
Katanga government spokesman
said. There are also representa-
tives from Kivu province and
northern Kasai, two areas held
wholly or partly by Gizenga and
his Kremlin-backed forces.
Some Western diplomats con-
sidered it significant, however,
that in the Leopoldville group will
be Cleophas Hamitatu, president
of Leopoldville province.
Still, diplomats and even offi-
cials of President Moise Tshombe's
independent government of Ka-
tanga conceded that without Gi-
zenga the talks may accomplish
little. They predicted negotiations
will boil down to financial mat-
ters, with Katanga resisting pres-
sure, as the richest province in
all the Congo, to help bail out
the indigent central government.
It. was a question whether Ka-
tanga will be more receptive now
that it is bound with the central
government in a military pact to
rout Communist influence from
the Congo.

U.S. Claims
Soviets Stall
Laos Truce
WASHINGTON (R) - A United
States spokesman yesterday accus-
ed Russia of stalling on a peace
settlement for Laos while pouring
in arms to gain Communist con-
trol of the country.
Faced by military setbacks and
diplomatic rebuff, United States
strategists had under way a review
of the Laotian crisis including a
possible shift in diplomatic tactics
and a step-up in United States aid
to the southeast Asian kingdom.
State Department Press Officer
Joseph W. Reap set forth the
United States view in confirming
as generally accurate a New York
Times eyewitness report from
Communist rebel-controlled terri-
tory in Laos.
The newspaper account, which
was said to match closely United
States intelligence reports, said
Soviet-built planes are ferrying 45
tons of arms daily to the Red
forces in Laos-a rate which would
bring the airlifted supplies to a
total of nearly 4,000 tons.
Also reported was a weekly con-
voy of 50 Soviet-built trucks load-
ed with Russian weapons. Com-
munist North Vietnamese "tech-
nicians," were said to be among
those joining the Communist
Pathet Lao rebels' fight against
royal Laotian government troops.

TOPEKA, Kan. (W - Air Force
Capts. Freeman B. Olmstead and
John R. McKone said yesterday
their RB47 reconnaissance bomb-
er returned the fire of a single
attackink Russian fighter before
their plane was shot down in
flames over the Barents Sea last
July 1.
The two young men, facing some
100 newsmen in the Forbes Air
Force Base service-men's club,
told their story publicly for the
first time since their release from
a Russian prison Jan. 25.
Set Bursley
On Committee
Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
Arbor) has been appointed to the
new five-man House legislative
committee on Michigan's econom-
ic growth by Speaker Don R.
Pears (R-Buchanan).
Bursley introduced the House-
Senate resolution which created
the committee. His Senate col-
leagues on the committee have not
been named.
Bursley said that he would ask
whomever is named chairman to
call a meeting which will coin-
cide with the March 14 dinner in
Ann Arbor marking the opening
of the city's industrial research
park.

FLIERS REVEAL:
RB47 Returned Soviet Fire

e

They told a dramatic story ofo
cold, privation, solitary confine-I
ment during most of their sevenI
months in custody, and endless
interrogations by Russian officials.
They said they refused to sign
statements saying they had been1
ordered to cross the Soviet border.4
Only Survivors
Olmstead and McKone are the
only known survivors of the six-
man crew of the RB47. The two
fliers said they had no knowledge
of the fate of their missing mates.
Yesterday was the first public'
disclosure that the American plane
fired back at the Soviet attacker.
Olmstead said he saw three
parachutes including the one
carrying McKone, and McKone
said he saw two, including Olm-
stead's. In addition, the two cap-
tains indicated that one of the
parachutes probably was that of
Maj.- Willard G. Palm, the plane's
commander.
Respond Clearly
The two men gave generally re-
sponsive answers and seldom had
to grope for words in the news
conference that lasted a little over
an hour.
However, they gave only sketchy
details of the fateful mission.
There were no answers, or only
partial answers, as to, the exact
nature of the RB47's mission so
near the Soviet Union, why the
Russians released them suddenly

after holding them for about seven
months, and why they were never
given specific details of their in-
terrogation and treatment while
in prison.
The Russians had contended
that the reconnaissance plane,
converted from a B47 jet bomber
for surveillance work.
McKone and Olmstead said in a
written statement yesterday that
the aircraft was flying parallel to
the Russian border but under
questioning would give no other
clues as to the flight plan or the
nature of the mission.
New Rock ets
Meet Success
In First Shots
CAPE CANAVERAL (P) - The
Air Force successfully completed
first round testing of its new fam-
ily of Blue Scout "economy" rock-
ets yesterday, propelling a payload
1,580 miles into space to study
the potential radiation threat to
manned space flight.
The 172-pound payload, which
carried four unique radio tele-
scopes and a simulated piece of
human skin, radioed "loud and
clear" signals throughout the 40-
minute flight.

-AP Wirephoto
CAPSIZED-Pacifist demonstrations protesting the entrance of
the United States Navy tender Proteus were broken up by British
Navy and police launches.
U.S. Polaris Ship Sails
Into Loch Past Pacifists
HOLY LOCH, Scotland (lP) - The mother ship of America's fleet
of Polaris submarines sailed majestically past canoeing demon-
strators yesterday and berthed in Scotland's Holy Loch.
Half a dozen English pacifists ,aboard the small boats wound
up in jail;
With the arrival of the tender Proteus, a unique Western base
was established in the stretch of water off the River Clyde.
The $50 million vessel was maneuvered into her mooring place
by three British naval tugs-and got down to business almost im-
mediately. Her 980 officers and men began making hurried prepara-
tions for the arrival of the nu-

Iii;-'

C OME

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CHRlJi CHF
SA B\ ATHl

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PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH'
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Wmn. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors

'r h

clear-powered submarine Patrick
Henry,
"We've got work to do and I
don't think many of us will be
having shore leave immediately,"
said Capt. Richard B. Laning,
skipper of the 18,500-ton Proteus.
The arrival of the tender, a

FI

National
Roundup

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An imme-
diate buildup in this nation's com-
bat troops-involving three more
army divisions and 25,000 more
Maines-was forecast yesterday
by Congressional sources.
Leaders familiar with a reap-
prisal of this country's defenses
ordered by President John F. Ken-
nedy, said they expected him to
ask Congress for funds and au-
thority for the expansion.
Both moves would involve
strengthening United States abil-
ity to fight limited wars, and re-
quire revisions.and additions in
the $42 billion defense budget sent
to Congress by former President
Dwight D, Eisenhower.
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy and New Zealand's
Prime Minister Keith J. Holyoake
yesterday expressed deep concern
over "the hostile and aggressive
attitude of the Chinese Commun-
ist regime."
In a joint statement after a con-
ference at the White House, the
two leaders reported special con-'
cern with what they called the
particular menace which the Red
Chinese regime "poses to the
peace of Asia, Africa and .Latin
America."
* * *
WASHINGTON - In what one
Democratic leader called a sign
of national affection, the House
and Senate armed services com-
mittees yesterday approved legis-
lation to restore former President
Dwight D. Eisenhower's five-star
Army rank.
The House group acted first, and
the Senate committee followed
suit.
E3S

topic of high excitement in Scot-
land for months past, was ac-
complished smoothly and with a
minimum of fuss-except for the
daredevil activities of six English
pacifists in three canoes \ and a
rowboat.
All six young men wound up
behind bars in the police station
at nearby Dunoon, charged with
"a breach of the peace" in trying
to prevent the Proteus from berth-
'ing midway down Holy Loch.
The waterborne demonstration
ended after a few 'hectic minutes
with three pacifists soaked, three
fairly dry and all six under ar-
rest. Crewmen watched silently
from the - decks of the Proteus
nearby,
One canoe, carrying ringleaders
Terry Chandler and Harry Smith,
was rammed by a naval launch
after being warned by loudspeaker
to stay clear of the Proteus.
Chandler, 20, and Smith, 27, were
pitched into the water and im-
mediately began swimming toward
the slow-moving tender.

11

Services: 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50 a.m.
Sermons: 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Dr.
Kuizenga preaching, "The Faith of aI
Woman." 11:50 a.m.-Rev. Jack
kardt: "The Remnant."

Henry
Clever
Borc-

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS-CENTER
Sunday, March 5
10:30 a.m. Seminar in Chaffee Room. "The
Christian Man." Rev. Jack Borckardt, The
Strange Fact of Foregiveness.
11:30 a.m. Student Coffee Hour in French
Room
4:30 p.m. Bible Study, "Key Concepts of the
New Testament"-Gospel and Kingdom.
217 S. Observatory, Pat Pickett.
6:30 p.m. Presbyterian Student Fellowship
Forum held in French Room. Question for
discussion: What about Pacifism?
Tuesday, March 7
4:30 p.m. Bible Study, "Key Concepts of the
New Testament"-Gospel and Kingdom.
217 S. Observatory, Pat Pickett (This is a
repeat of Sunday study)
9:00 p.m. Coffee, tea and conversation with
Pat, 217 S. Observatory
Thursday, March 9
4:15 p.m. "The Message of the New Testa-
ment"-Concerning the Titles of Jesus.
Jack Borckardt, Lane Hall Conference Room
Friday, March 10
6:15 Grad Group Dinner
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Services 9:30 and, 11:00 a.m. "My Name is
Pontius Pilate," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
10:20-10:40 a.m. BIBLE LECTURE, Dr. Pres-
ton Slosson.
CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30 and 10:55 a.m., ages
crib through 12th grade.
STUDENT GUILD: 524 Thompson, 7:30 p.m.
program each Sunday.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL.
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. German Service, chapel
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 a.m. Seminar: Christian Thought, Rev.
J. Edgar Edwards, Guild House
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship, Rev. Russel
Fuller.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756.
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Sundays--
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS--
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL .
1511 Washtenaw Avenue.
(ThedLutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur Dauer, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with ser-
mon by John Vavroch, '59M, now a student
at Concordia Seminary, Springfield, Ill.
(Communion at 9:45).
Sunday at ?:45 and 11:15: Bible Study of
"The Soul"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Fellowship Supper and Religious,
Program, "God at Work in our Personal
Lives"
Wednesday at 7:30 and at 9:15: Midweek
Lenten Vespers, with sermon by the pastor,
"The Ewer and Basin." (Symbol of Pilate)
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow at Berkshire
Church School 10:00
Church Service 11:00
Adult Discussion: "A Consideration of Resolu-
tions"-Daniel Bernd.
Sermon: "Under the Noon-day Sun"-Rev.
Malcolm Sutherland.
Student Group: "Psychology and Religion" -
Dr. John Shepard.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 Sunday School.
8:45 & 11:00 Worship Services. "The Sin of
Anger."
545 Youth Groups.
7:00 Evening Service. "The End of One's
Self."
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.-Prayer Meeting.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship Service
11:15 A.M. Coffee hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship. Len-
ten Sermon Series. Words to Live By: (3)
Reconciliation. Sermon by Dr. Rupert.
10:15 Seminar: "Meet the Professor" series.
Prof. Kenneth E. Boulding, Economics De-
partment, speaking on "Disarmament is a
Bargaining Problem"
5:30 p.m. Fellowship Supper
7:00 p.m. Worship and Program.TThe begin-
ning of four-week series on the great doc-
trines of Christianity-"The Church," Rev.
Edward Roth speaking.
Wednesdays
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion, Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over in
time for 8:00 classes)
Fridays
5:30 p.m. Wesley Graduate Student Fellow-
ship dinner followed by program. Pine :Room
NORTH' SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care Provided
Minister: Dr. Wm. S. Baker
Sermon: Christ's Work: Service
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, A'ssistant Minister
SUNDAY-
9:45 Church school, student class led by
Prof. Edgar Willis.
11:00 Morning Worship, "The Weak-
ness of a Politician," Mr.- Middleton,
preaching.
6:45 American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, A Dialogue: Christian and Jew.
Guests from Hillel Foundation.
WEDNESDAY-
12:00-1:00 Luncheon Group, a discussion
of the theology of Karl Barth.
7:30 Lenten Service, The Rev. Arthur
Ryan, speaker.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Mr. Alvin Hoksbergen, Pastor.
Morning Services, 8:45 and 11:00 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1415 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Meeting for Worship, 10:00 and 11:30 a.m.
Adult Forum: 10:00 a.m.
Young Friends, 7:00 p.m.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street and South Forest Avenue
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone NO 8-7622
Sunday
9:00 a.m. Worship Service and Holy Com-
munion.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
11:00 a.m. Worship Service.
7:00 p.m. Bach Cantata, "Out of Dark-
ness I Call Lord, to Thee." William
Osborne, Director.

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 350 S. 5th
Morning Service 10:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:30 p.m.
Guest Minister: The Rev. Harold Korver, min-
ister to the Fifth- Reformed Church in Mus-
kegon, Michigan.

r

I

III "Inert rcIBtn^La /1C *04UDICT I

Wednesday

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