100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 10, 1961 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ERSITY OF HAWAII:
ian Interchange Center Opens

Union Committee Plans
To Study MUG Problems

FAITH WEINSTEIN
iversity of Hawaii's much
nd much criticized Cen-
Cultural and Technical
ige Between East and
.an operations this sem-
h 60 Asian students. 1
very favorably impressed
inclusiveness and scope
East-West center's pro-
Prof. James M. Davis,
f the International Cen-
special consultant to the
t Center said. "They have
ally good programs built
r system."
st-West center set-up in-
nerican and Asian studies
igrams, similar- to the
dies program at the Uni-
'he programs are offered
ed group of Asians and
is (at about a 95-1 ratio),
at the graduate level.
rernment Supported
gh officially a part of
rsity of Hawaii, the cen-

ter is largely supported by govern-
knent funds-approximately $10
million per year.
"They're the only people I2know
who currently have more money
than ideas," Prof. Davis remarked,
adding that much of their money
is currently going into capital out-
lay-erecting several new buildings
on the university campus both to
school and. house the incoming
students.
"They have been given govern-
ment money to build almost from
scratch, the kind of total Inter-
national student program we have
slowly developed over 125 years,"
he added. "It makes us realize
that an incredible amount of
money goes into our programs
without really being aware of it.
To Spend $10 Million
"The thing that struck me,"
Davis declared," is that they are
planning to spend $10 million per
year to build up what we have
here already." In fact, the Uni-

NEWMAN CLUB.
Communion Breakfast

r: PROF. EDWARD STASHEFF

"The Lay Apostolate"
'1 A A A,

k- .

:30 A.M.

e

50c

Sunday, February~12

ti:

3 0 i> >OC ;=>
PING SAY: The best way to say '"Be My Valen.
ne" is to bring her to Leo's for a grand meal.
f Ic
Enjoy the finest
Cantonese
Foodt
e-Out Orders Anytime
- Closed Mondays -----]
EO PING CAFE
8 West Liberty Street - Phone NO 2-5624

versity's area studies programs are
much more expensive than those
of the East-West center, "because
we have more area study pro-
grams."
The center is situated in Hawaii
primarily because of its strategic
location, between the Pacific coun-
tries and the mainland.
The ambunt of money given to
the Center by the government has
allowed the creation of several
special features that few other
area study centers can offer.
"First of all, they have an ade-
quate scholarship program." By
1965, the Center expects to pro-
vide 2,000 full scholarships-for
educational, personal, living and
travel expenses. For the Asian
students, the scholarships will in-
clude enough money for a study
tour on the mainland.
Scholarships Available
Of the 2,000 scholarships, 1,6000
will be available to Asian and Pa-
cific area students; while 400 will
be reserved for Americans who
are Asian area students capable
of getting their master's degree
in Asian studies in two years,"
Prof. Davis said.
The East-West center has a
specific problem with staffing,
Prof. Davis said. "The Vniversity
of Hawaii plans to integrate the
teaching staff of the center into
the rest of the university as much
as possible.
"This limits them to working
within the university's salary level
-and the university's salaries are
not very high." Since the univer-
sity cannot, within its regulations,
provide travel or moving expenses
to any new faculty member, they
have a limited chance to lur9 men
to teach at the center.
Because of this problem, Davis
thinks that their teaching staff
will consist of men who are drawn
there because they are interested
in the concept of the Center and
teaching rather than in research.
Grants Attract
To attract the top scholars in
the field, the center has an "ad-
vanced program," grants of federal
funds to individual "senior schol-
ars" who will come to the center
"to pursue their own scholarly
activities on a mature level, free
from other responsibilities," Prof.
Davis said. These men will not be
part of the university staff, and
so will not be limited to its salaries
and subject to its restrictions.
"The center also is planning a
series of conferences, along the
line of their semi-annual East-
West philosophic conference. They
have a tradition of concern with
East-West problems, which they
intend to promote," Prof. Davis
said. Several sub-centers - such
as an International Theater Cen-
ter, a Race Relations Research
Center, and East-West Economic
Relations Center-are also plan-
ned.
Plans Exciting
"Their housing plans are very
exciting," Prof. Davis noted. Asian
and American students will live
together while in the program, in
apartments for 10 (eight Asians
and two Americans) with a joint
bath and living room, and indivi-
dual sleeping and study quarters.
"Their plans for living units are
the realization of a dream I've
had for a long time," Davis said.
"They are excellent plans for this
kind of integrated operation."

(Continued from Page 1)
does not want to exclude these
students. "They are an integral
part of this community and it is
our desire and duty to -serve
them."
Fears 'Groundless'
Fears that the MUG may cease
to be the "intelectual forum" it
has served for some students are
groundless, Morton said. "There is
absolutely no reason why such
activity will be forced to stop."
The "disagreeable" tone that is
felt in the MUG may have per-
meated other Union facilities, but'
the main concern is centered here,
Ross said. "Over 80 per cent of
the people who come to the Un-
ion come to the MUG. They often
judge the whole Union by what
they see there."
Complaints about the Union's
atmosphere have come from stu-
dents, faculty and alumni. "Old-
er residents of Ann Arbor and
alumni have been one of the big-
gest sources of complaint," Mor-
ton said.
Friends Group
Plans, Meeting
The American Friends Service
Committee is sponsoring a con-
ference on world peace tomorrow
at Flint College, Ann Blalock, ad-
visor of the Ann Arbor Young
Friends said yesterday.
The morning, afternoon and
evening sessions of the conference
will consider "A Moral Basis for
Foreign Policy," "Power Among
Men," and "Who is the Enemy?"
They will feature speakers, a film,
panel discussions and open dis-
cussions.
Mrs. Blalock added that trans-
portation will be arranged for
those who wish to attend. There
will be a .50 cent fee for each pro-
gram.

Reports of illegal activities in
the MUG have also come to the
attention of the Union through
reports from the local police and
the dean of men's office.
Students Comment
Another indication of the un-
favorable atmosphere in the Un-
ion is the attitude many students
have adopted towards it, Ross
claimed. "There is student com-
ment from- some quarters that
many students dislike the ques-
tionable atmosphere in theMUG."
He pointed out that the reve-
nue from the MUG has- fallen off
during the past few years. Al-
though many factors enter into
this recession of trade, the tone
of the MUG can be seen as an
important one, he said.
The committee will report its
findings and recommendations to
the board of directors by March
9. Until the whole, board acts
upon these conclusions, no for-
mal action will be taken by the
Union staff.
Studying, Games Limited
"We have, however, limited
studying and card playing in the
MUG so they will not interfere
with the dinner hours," Morton
said.
Morton said the Union was not
opposed to studying and card play-
ing perse. "But theseactivities
may cause a disturbance if a
large crowd gathers, interferes
with meal hours, ,messes up the
premises, and severely limits
movement in the ,grill."
OSCAR BRANDI

Texas Group
Sets Protest
For Sunday
Students for Direct Action at
the University of Texas have an-
nounced a nation-wide Lincoln's
Day theatre stand-in Sunday to
protest alleged segregation by
local movie theatres.
Spokesmen said they have "firm"
commitments for supporting
stand-ins and pickets that day at
the University as well as in San
Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago,
New York and Oberlin.

and at the

2. MEMBERSHIP MIXER
Sunday, Feb. 12,7:30 P.M.
Admission Free to Hillel Members
Non-members admission-$1.00 (can be credited to dues)
Watch the Daily for details of Hillel classes, lectures, special events

SHERWOOD
EICO
GARRARD "A"
DYNA-KIT

SONY
VIlKING
AR
JENSEN

PRE-RECORDED TAPES
We offer the know-how and

I .U the right deal
/1319 S. University (near Washtenaw)

NO 8

Hi i Studio
Student Hi Fi Trading Center

U

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Streef

WELCOMES ALL STUDENTS'
at
. SABBATH SERVICES TONIGHT AT 7:15
Speaker: Dr. Martin A. Cohen, Ass't. Dean, Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion

SUNDAY MATINEE
4:00 P.M.

at the
CAFE PROMETH EAN

Have you tried our New Complimentary
GOURMET TABLE?
It' a mouth-watering addition to our
SEAFOODS-STEAKS -CHICKEN.

. I

---

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
FOR
WALKER MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
IF .... .. you wish to be affiliated with a
Progressive Automotive Parts
Manufacturer
SMulti-plant
' Gross 1960 Sales-$60 Million
IF .. ... challenge and recognition are what
you seek as
a Manufacturing Process Engineer
a Product Development Engineer
Then we want to invite you to our
ON-CAMPUS interviews on
Wednesday, February 22

web,

e

r

52 WINES
(including 7 Champagnes)
and Beer

SUPPER CLUB

.s

PAUL TOMPKINS
at the Hammond Organ
OPEN DAILY: Noon to 9:30 P.M.
Phone NO 8-8760

S

3715 Jackson Road

2 miles west of Ann Arbor),

i
I

*uemmmi~r~mm~u".amtsra.m Wm m* MMMmw LMMma im
. R
IN
"
RI
t R
O - R
roU
R
R
s
I
R
r4' /
Philsophcall
fI
S ea ngthos
r
M
V LENINISI
ap
R
1 R
t e** ~f 6 I

NEED A CLEAN
SHIRT TODAY?

1

I - -

For same-day shirt service, take yours to Greene's
before 10:00 A.M. Pick them up in the afternoon all
sparkling clean and individually wrapped in cellophane.

OR A CLEAN
SUIT TODAY?

For same-day drycleaning service, take your gar-
ments to Greene's. There is no extra charge for same
day service - take shirts and drycleaning together -
make it one stop - save time - save energy - save
money.

0

0

0

0

Enjoy leisurely dining
in pleasant surroundings
Featuring DAILY SPECIALS to fit the student's budget - in-
cludes our own relish assortment, choice of appetizer, the
main course, salad, freshly baked rolls, and your choice of
beverage.
Also selections from our regular menu.
- -r - - -r -rr r ii r-- - - - -a r r r - - - - - - - R - - I

Greene's have two complete plants in the campus
area. 1213 South University Ave., and 516 E. Liberty
St., across from the Ann Arbor Bank.

0

"

0

0

Each of Greene's five plants service delivery routes
that cover the area surrounding it. Call the plant near-
est you for prompt pick-up and delivery service. Ask

your driver about our convenient charge
tem and Greene's Handy Valet Service.

account sys-

F

MmMMMMMMMMM

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan