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February 26, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Chicago Faculty, Official Battle on Grades

F

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'tit 11:30 A..

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CHICAGO-The University of
Chicago registrar has become
deeply embroiled in a battle with
the faculty over grading systems.
At present the university allows
professors to give out grades of I
(incomplete), which theoretically
indicate that the student concern-
ed is to make up the missing work
within one quarter, but does not
remove them from the transcript
if the work is not made up.
The registrar, William Van
Cleve, attacked the large percent-
age of these grades given out, and
announced that he would transfer
any grade not made up within the.
required time to an F.
He also stated that F's would
be given to .students whose in-
structors did not enter any grades
for them. It has been faculty
practice to give no grade if the
student did no ,work during the
quarter.
1 Faculty members immediately
protested the move vigorously,
claiming that this went far be-
yond the rights of the adminis-
tration. They said that it was the
faculty member's perogative to
decide what grade a student should
receive.

Faced with this opposition from
the faculty, Van Cleve backed
down from his previous stand, an-
nouncing that he would try to
change I's into F's or to give F's
where no grade was reported.
But the verbal battle goes on, as
Van Cleve continues to attack
faculty policy on the incomplete
grade, and the faculty continues
to defend its rights to give grades
in whatever manner it thinks best.
* * *
LOS ANGELES--The University
of California, Los Angeles, cam-
pus newspaper has entered a has-
sle both within the staff and with
the student government over the
policies of the newly appointed
editor.
Four staff members of the UCLA
Daily Bruin have been fired in a
struggle for control with Editor-
in-Chief Charles Rossie, who was
appointed by the president of the
Associated Students of UCLA to
fill the vacancy left by the resigna-
tion of last semester's editor.
Rossie's first act was to fire the
associate editor, replacing him
with one of the editor's fraternity
brothers. Marty Cooper, the fired

associate editor, immedately re-
plied with a letter accusing Rossie
of firing him without any proper
reason.
Three vacancies still remained
on the Editorial Board at last
notice.
Then the UCLA Student Judicial
Board met to consider a petition
for the removel of Rossie on tech-
nical grounds relating to the man-
ner of his appointment.
SJB found that Rossie's appoint-
ment had been against regulations,
and declared that he was no long-
er the editor.
The same evening, this decision
was reversed by the ASUCLA
Student Legislative Council, which
voted 14-3 to overrule the SJB
and retain Rossie as editor.
In an article run in the editorial
columns of the Bruin, Joel Wachs,
president of ASUCLA, defended
the SLC and Rossie with extreme
criticism of Rossie's opponents.
Wachs said: "Since his appro-
val (by SLC), a select few from
the small group of people left in
the Bruin office, fighting to retain
their single-handed control over
the only media of mass communi-
cation on campus, have resorted
to pettiness, slander, and malicious
personal attacks to distort the
issue completely."
He went on to discuss the
charge that "This situation will
lead to an Editorial Board com-
posed of ten dumb Greeks," and
that "Rossie is firing people in
order to replace them with un-
qualified fraternity brothers."
"This is an emotionally inspired
lie," Wachs said.
MADISON-University of Wis-
consin students were among the

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Presents
Dr. MARTIN A COHEN, Asst. Dean
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
an
"REFORM JUDAISM"
Toinorrow, Monday, Feb. 27 at 8 P.M.

several hundred people who crowd-
ed into the hearing room of the
state legislature's judiciary com-
mittee for an open hearing on the
film "Operation Abolition" and
the House Un-American Activities
Committee.
Statements calling the students
in the United States "dupes of the
Communists" were traded with ac-
cusations that HUAC does not
"uphold individual human dig-
nity."
One of the students appearing
at the hearing, Arnold Lockshin,
president of the Socialist Club,
had been a participant in the
San Francisco riots discussed in
the film. He called the movie
"nothing but one filthy lie after
another."
The film had previously been
shown on the university campus
and excited controversy among
student organizations as to its
value and truthfulness.
.Fraternities'
Open Houses
To Start 'Rush
Men's rush begins today with
open houses at the 43 fraternities
from 2 - 5 p.m. and 7 - 9:30 p.m.
and continues for the next two
weeks.
Fraternities will also hold open
house tomorrow and Tuesday
nights from 7 - 9:30 p.m. Begin-
ning Wednesday, they will extend
invitations to smokers for Wed-
nesday through Friday nights, 7 to
9, which will allow rushees to
spend more time at an individual
house.
Starting the following Monday
prospective pledges will be asked
to lunches or dinners throughout
the week.
The Inter-Fraternity Council
urges rushees to visit as many
houses as possible during the first
few days and not to accept a bid
until the following week to gain a
broader picture of the system.
Rushees need not have signed up
to attend open houses, but IFC
Rush Chairman Robert Peterson,
'62, warned that no one may pledge
unless he does. Men may sign up
until Tuesday afternoon at the
Michigan desk.
Two rush counselors from each
house will be available in Room
3Z of the Union from 2 tq, 5 week-
days during the period.

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