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February 09, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-09

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,1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILI

PAGE T

U.S. Halts Ceylon Aid'
In Reaction to Seizure
Of Two Oil Companies

UNEMPLOYMENT:
Wirtz Opposes Effect
Of Cutting work Week
WASHINGTON (P)-Cutting the work week by law from 40 to 35
hours would not solve unemployment and might actually reduce jobs
in some industries, Labor Secretary W. Willard Wirtz said yesterday.
Testifying before the House Ways and Means Committee, Wirtz
described President John F. Kennedy's tax reducing and revising plan
as "the top-priority item on the agenda of labor interests this
year." The key to creating jobs, he said, is "to release purchasing power

LOOK TO GENEVA:
NResume Underround

WASHINGTON ()-The United
States resumed underground nu-
clear weapons testing yesterday
while the nation's top disarma-
ment negotiator looked toward
Geneva in a 'mildly optimistic
mood over chances for progress
at renewed talks.
William C. Foster, chief of the
United States Disarmament
Agency, is to leave early today
for Tuesday's resumption of the
17-nation disarmament talks at
Geneva. United States officials
said his emphasis will be on first
step "confidence-building'" agree-
ments looking to a test-ban treaty
and he is at least cautiously hope-
ful of some progress.
The Atomic Energy Commis-
sion announced resumption of the
underground testing in Nevada
with shots in the intermediate
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Soviet Ambas-
sador Anatoly F. Dobrynin Thurs-
day called on Secretary of State
Dean Rusk to express Russian con-
cern aver the treaty of coopera-
tion between Germany and France.
The meeting, held on Dobrynin's
initiative, did 'not touch on Cuba
and only lightly brushed the top-
Ic of disarmament.
* * *
CHEYENNE-The Wyoming leg-
islature Thursday passed and sent
to Gov. Cliff Hansen a right-to-
work bill, banning compulsory un-
ion membership as a qualification
for obtaining employment.
TOKYO-Communist China ac-
cused the United States yesterday
of preparing for aggression in
Northeast Asia by arming its
troops in South Korea with atomic
weapons.
* * .
WASHINGTON-Roswell L. Gil-.
patric will leave his job as deputy
secretary of defense sometime be-
tween June and October, a Pen-
tagon spokesman said yesterday.
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya-The
British protectorate of Brunei an-
nounced Thursday it will join the
projected Federation of Malaysia
this year, becoming the fifth mem-
ber of the new nation which links
Singapore, Malaya and the British
Borneo territories of Brunei, North
Borneo and Sarawak.
WASHINGTON - Igor Cassini,
the New York society columnist
who writes under the nlame of
"Cholly Knickerbocker," was in-
dicted on charges of failing to reg-
ister as a publicity agent for the
late Dominican Dictator Rafael
Trujillo.
NEW YORK-The New York
Stock Exchange yestrday demon-
strated the kind of resiliency it has
shown repeatedly in 1963, absorb-
ing early selling and closing with
prices on the upgrade. Standard
and Poor's 500 index closed un-
changed, with 425 lindustrials" also
uncharged, 2A rails up 0.14 and 50
utilities off 0.02.

range or less-meaning the equiva-
lent of something between 20,000
and a million tons of TNT. The
AEC would not say how many
blasts were touched off but con-
firmed there were more than one.x
The latest prior test in Nevada
was on Dec. 12 and was the 59th]
one announced for the series+
which began 17-months ago. +
President John F. Kennedy on
Jan. 26 suspended the Nevada testa
ing in an obvious effort to spur
the test-ban talks then going on+
among the United States, the1
Soviet Union and Britain.,
But the Spviet;Union on Jan. 31]
broke off the New York talks with
a request that they be renewed'
at Geneva this month. The next
day, Secretary of State Dean Rusk
announced Kennedy was ordering
resumption of the Nevada tests.
This was in line with the Presi-
dent's Jan. 26 statement that ,he
would not accept any prolonged,]
unpoliced moratorium on testing.-
State Department sources indi-I
cated Foster and his colleagues
will concentrate at Geneva on
modest aims, looking to a test-ban+
agreement because it felt there is
virtually no chance for any major
progress toward general disarma-
ment. ,
The Geneva parley has made
little headway since it first got
under way last March. But theR
conference could continue indefi-1
nightly.
Keating gives
Adm inistration
Cuban Facts'
WASHINGTON VP)-Sen. Ken-
neth B. Keating (R-NY) said yes-
terday he :gave the Kennedy Ad-]
ministration additional informa-
tion on the military situation in
Cuba and recommended what,
should be done about it.
Keating said he passed his in-
formation and advice along to
John A. McCone, director of the3
Central Intelligence Agency.
Neither Keating nor McCone
would give details about what the
senator told the CIA chief on a
visit to Keating's office. But Keat-
ing said, "Mr. McCone has told me
these recommendations will be
transmitted to the President."
Keating added that none of his
recommendations "involves mili-
tary action against Cuba." He said
the added data he gave the in-
telligence chief involve reports of
a military buildup "which I have
not been able to confirm and which
I have not publicly 'revealed."

Organization
To Remove
Technicians
Marks First Action
Under Recent Law
WASHINGTON (M)-The United
States told Ceyloi yesterday that
a $3.8 million aid program is being
halted until Ceylon appropriately
compensates two American oil
companies for properties nation-
alized last June.
The Agency for International
Development said that within 30
days its mission-including 15
technicians and five administra-
tors-would be returned to the
United States.
It was the first such action or-
dered by AID Administrator David
Bell under an amendment to the
Foreign Assistance Act which
went into effect on Feb. 1.
Wording of Law.
In a note to the Ceylon govern-
ment, Ambassador Frances E. Wil-
lis drew attention to the wording
of the new law which says United
States assistance shall remain
suspended until appropriate steps
are taken to compensate American
companies for private property
which has been nationalized.
This left an implication that
when a settlement is reached on
the claims for $3.4 million, the
United States assistance program
will be resumed. Ceylon nation-
alized 83 gas stations belonging to
the firms.
Since July 1, 1955, the United
States has extended $79.6 million
to Ceylon in grants, loans, sur-
plus foods and technical assist-
ance.
Will Stop Loan
The effect of the suspension now
will be to halt some $890,000 in
technical assistance projects and
a $3 million development loan to
help expand and modernize the
Kutanayake airport, 20 miles from
Colombo. The modernization would
permit use of the airport by inter-
national jet airliners.
However, the United States is
ready to continue a food for peace
program to Ceylon, the agency
said.
The United States move was
made with apparent reluctance.

and to stimulate investment in
productive,labor-using enterprises
by a tax reduction."
Not for Substitutes
Wirtz said he is not pushing for
a tax program as a substitute for
a shorter work week, which he
agreed had been the historic ad-
justment to the mechanization of
industry.
He said, however, that most of!
the time the lessening of working
hours had been accomplished "by
collective bargaining and private
adjustment." This is continuing,'
and he approves of it.
The AFL-CIO is urging a reduc-
tion of the work week by statute.
Increase Costs
But, Wirtz said, a legislated,
across-the-board cut in hours
"would not in itself be the right
answer. It would increase costs sa
much in some industries that, with
international competition what it
is, it could lead to less rather than
more employment."
Already seven per cent of the
work in the United States is be-
ing done on an overtime basis, he
told the committee.
Wirtz acknowledged that there
are jobs in some fields "looking
for workers" and that retraining
of the unemployed offers promise.
But he said the gains being made
in this direction are measured in
the thousands, while unemploy-
ment remains in the millions.
Sees '64 Loss
For Kennedy
WASHINGTON (P)-New York
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller says a
Republican standard-bearer can
unhorse President John F. Ken-
nddy in 1964 but that it would be
a mistake for the GOP to settle
on its champion now.
"The important thing is to
strengthen and unite the party,"
Rockefeller said.
Republicans, he told a news con-
ference Wednesday, must offer
constructive alternatives to ad-
ministration programs and develop
all the talent they have.
THE CHURCH OF THE
SECOND BIRTH
427 S. Fifth Ave.
Half block south of Public Library
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship

Air Forces
Hit Viet Cong
AP BAI LAI, Viet Nam (W)
American-piloted fighter bomberst
laid down a blanket of fire bombs,I
rockets and machine gun fire yes-t
terday as South Vietnamese
ground forces opened a major
operation a g a i n s t Communist
guerrillas hiding in tinder-dry1
countryside not far from Saigon.1
it was one of the heaviest air
strikes in the war against Viet
Cong from North Viet Nam. Doz-
ens of fires were set in the area
and columns of smoke towered in-
to the sky.
United States Army helicopters
carried South Vietnamese troopst
into the area, laced with canals
and sprawling with dry brush, to
engage guerrilla forces which hadI
increased their activity over the
past several weeks.
The American-piloted B-26's and
T-28's ripped into concentrations
of enemy troops under trees, straf-
ed and bombed up and down thet
canals and blistered the entiref
area with napalm fire bombs.
Brush fires spread rapidly for
miles over dry rice fields. One
field was enveloped by a continu-
ous sheet of flame half a mile
wide.
The battle scene is about 130
miles southwest of Saigon.
None of the 13 troop-carrying
helicopters was reported hit, al-
though observation planes and the
fighter-bombers reported they had
drawn heavy machine gun fire
from positions in and around a
hamlet near here.
Government officials maintain-
ed tight security and did not dis-
close the number of troops in-
volved or casualties,

GOP Heads
Hit Tax Cut,
As 'Gamble'
WASHINGTON (P)-The Sen-
ate-House Republican leadership
yesterday assailed President John
F. Kennedy's tax-cutting proposals
as "undoubtedly the biggest eco-
nomic gamble in the history of
nations."
A statement by the GOP leaders
said the administration's program
is based on a philosophy which
says that "the only choice is be-
tween two kinds of deficits.
No Conference
The statement was adopted
Wednesday at the first meeting
at this Congressional session of
top GOP leaders in both houses.
It was released yesterday without
the usual televised news confer-
ence by Senate Minority Leader
Sen. Everett M. Dirksen and
House GOP leader Rep. Charles A.
Halleck (R-Ind).
The Republicans said Kennedy
has described as the "core" of his
program for solving unemploy-
ment a $10.2 billion net tax cut,
a $4.5 billion increase in federal
spending and a $12 billion deficit.
Desperate Economics
They charged the administra-
tion 'is engaging in a desperate
kind of-economics, because it has
no solution to the unemployment
problem."
"The Republican goal in, this
Congress will be a reduction in
federal spending which can lead
to a reasonable tax cut," they said.
"It can be done because we have
done it. The only two major tax
cuts in the last 30 years were en-
acted by Republican congresses
and both times we cut spending
substantially."
_PIZZA KING
1308 S. University
NO 5-9655
NO 5-3800
rmFree Delivery
from 12 Noon, Daily
PIZZA, CHICKEN
and SANDWICHES

* KLH
" SHERWOOD
" ELECTROVOICE
* JENSEN
" SONY
9 FISHER MPX.

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TAPE RECORDERS A SPECIALTY-WE RENT PRE-RECORDED TAPES
FISHER KITS IN STOCK
We Guarantee Evrything We Sell N )
You Will Be Glad You Bought It Here O i8-74
1319 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor
I BLOCK EAST OF CAMPUS THEATRE, WEST OF WASHTENAW
AL LOGELIN

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HI-Ft STUDIO
Largest Inventory of High Fidelity Components In The Area

"
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WE STOCK
REK-O-KUT
AR'S
SCOTT
DYNA KITS
CITATION
GARRARD

TONIGHT at 8:30!!
ON Stage-Hill Auditorium

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SELL
EICO
BOGEN
MARANTZ
JIM LANSING
ETC.

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presented by
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
In Association with the U-M Dance Dept.
Box Office Opens at 10 A.M.
Orch. $3.00, $2.00; 1st Baoc. $3.00, $2.00
APA Members 20-40% Discount

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~ABr BtATH

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I

An evening of Yiddish Entertainmeni
The "DYBBUK"
A film with English Subtitles
With commentary by Prof. Herbert Paper
Sunday, Feb 'i0th 7:30 P.)
BETH ISRAEL CENTER, An Arbor
Sponsored by B'nai Brith

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett

N

THlE GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
ANNOUNCES
200 SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE

FOR ITS

RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
M. 12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8 :CJ. Medi-
cl Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND' STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with Pas-
tor preaching on "Worthy of the Gospel."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study, Start-
ing course on "The Theology of the Lord's
Prayer."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, L'itheran Stu-
dents, Supper and Program. 'olk on his
work by the Rev. Hugo List, Industrial
Chaplain at the Dow Chemical Co., Mid-
land.
Monday ct 8:00: Course in Christian Doctrine.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.: Midweek Devotion.

SPRING 1963 SERIES

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary
TUESDAY--
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY--
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Postor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
SUNDAY-
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
7:00 p.m. "After the End, Then What?"-
Dr. George Mendenhall.
Tuesday-7:15 p.m. Study Group-"Church-
State Issues in American Life," Prof.. Paul
Kauper, Leader.
Wednesday-7:15-7:45 p.m. Vespers.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST1
183 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 o.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to-
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday-
evening 7:00 to 9:00.

FIRST
and

METHODIST CHURCH
WESLEY FOUNDATION

REALITY and CINEMA'

ENGRAVED GIFTS
for
VALENTINE'S DAY
featuring
CIRCLIE,
PINS
with her monogram
Sterling from $2.95
Gold filled from $4.95
Engraved
at no extra charge

A series of filnes illustrating
five cinematic approaches to reality
February 11
Expressionism
DESTINY
by Fritz Lang
March 4
Realism
THE CRIME OF M. LANGE
by Jean Renoir
March 25
Documentary
THE SILENT WORLD
by J: Y. Cousteau and Louis Malle
April 22
Expressionist Realism
THE LAST LAUGH

State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8.6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Morning Worship. The
Parables of Jesus, Brotherhood, A Basis of
Divine Judgment, sermon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA 01290 AM
102.0 FM, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, "Christianity and Com-
munism," "Prophetic Justice and Christian
Communism in Scripture."
6:00 p.m.--Wesley Fellowship Cabinet Meet-
ing, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Wesley Fellowship, Lounge. Dr.
Hoover Rupert will speak on "Renewal of
Modern Church and Students."
MONDAY
8:00 to 11:00-Open House, Jean Robe's
j apartment.
WEDNESDAY
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grad Supper, Pine Room.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Discussion, "Christian Ethics and
World Responsibility."
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship. Faculty-Student Dinner.
MONDAY
12:00 noon-Lunch and Discussion.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "Swords Into
Plowshares," Dr. William S. Harmon.
BIBLE LECTURE, 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL, crib-9th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-
5189.
Radio broadcast, WHRV, 1600, from 11:00-
12:00 noon.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
C."-'4^" 7.1(1 -.. -. ~m J.ou efo new stu-

11

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service coil 2-2756
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School

by F. W. Murnau
May 13

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