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May 24, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M TICHIGAN DIIN~

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Warns Ministers)

Im11pending Changes
Moscow's Attitudes)

ys Soviets
ty Switch
ijor Policy
es Trouble Spots
Asia, Cuba, Berlin

OTTAWA M) - Secretary of'
State Dean Rusk urged ministers
of the Atlantic Alliance yesterday
to be prepared for a sudden
change in Moscow's present mood.
He said prudence requires that
the West be ready when the Rus-
sians start rocking the boat again.
This, Rusk said, may happen
overnight in any of three places-
Cuba, Berlin, and South East Asia.
Delivers Warning
The secretary delivered his
warning at the morning session of
the second day meeting of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion's ministerial council, devoted
to a discussion of the internation-
al situation.
British, German and Turkish
foreign" ministers also spelled out
their governments' thinking on
major international headaches
affecting NATO directly or in-
directly.
Together with Lord David Home
of Britain and Gerhard Schroeder
of West Germany, Rusk explained
at length how Washington as-
sesses the Chinese-Soviet dispute
and its impact on the Kremlin's
present, cautious approach to in-
ternational issues.
Indifferent Mood
Though there. is no way of
knowing when and how Moscow's
current pleasant, almost indiffer-
ent mood will end, the West should
be prepared for a change for the
worse, Rusk said.
He drew a rather pessimistic
picture of the situation in Cuba,
where the Russians remain in con-
siderable strength: in Berlin,
where the Russians clingrtotheir
objectives; and in Laos, where no-
body knows whether Moscow will
be in a position to keep its obli-
gation to help the country become
truly neutral.
Rusk was slightly more optimis-
tic about South Viet Nam. As
favorable signs he listed better
cooperation of the villages with
the government and recent events
indicating improvement in efforts
to pacify the country.
Internal Problems
Discussing NATO's i n t e r n a l
problems, Rusk said he did not
think it was necessary for the
United States again to make a
solemn pledge that it will be loyal
to its allies. Any notion that the
United States wants to dominate
its partners in NATO is repug-
nant, he added.
Europe's growing affluence, he
went on, enables the European
allies to increase their support of
the alliance in terms of manpower
and logistic and economic support.
He suggested they also can do
more in assisting developing na-
tions.
Meany Disputes
Thesis of Report
WASHINGTON (MP - AFL-CIO
President-George Meany said yes-
terday he strongly dissents from
the Clay report's "cardinal thes-
is" that the foreign aid program
should "insist" on free enterprise
in the recipient countries.

DEAN RUSK
policy change
'U' SERVICE:
Bus Official
Cites, Study
Eldon C. Jones, office manager
of the newly formed Public Bus
Service, announced yesterday that
the transit company is studying
the feasibility of a city express
which would cater to University
students.
Another study is also being done
to consider possible service for
students running between major
University buildings, dormitories
and other centra' areas.
Jones noted that company offi-
cials are confident that the system
will grow. Although the present
volume of riders is now at "the
low point" Jones is convinced that
it will rise due to a lowered fare.

Khrushchev
Rejects War
As Solution
By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-Soviet Premier Ni-
kita Khrushchev, in a farewell to
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Cas-
tro, vowed last night he will rebuff
"delirious talk" about going to war
to promote world Communism.
The Soviet premier, speaking at
a reception after a rally for the
Cuban, evidently aimed his re-
mark at the Red Chinese.
Chinese insistence on a beliger-
ent attitude toward the West is
one of the roots of the current
Moscow-Peking squabble, which
will be considered at a Soviet-
Chinese meeitrng in Moscow July 5.
Violates Marxism
Khrushchev said the idea that
Communist world victory can'
come only through war violates
Marxism-Leninism.
Khrushchev told the reception
crowd he wanted to be friends
with everybody, but that the
Union of Soviet Socialist Repub-
lics has a 100-million-ton bomb
waiting for "imperialists" who
might feel like starting a war.
Deeper Crises
At the Lenin stadium, with the
Cuban leader at his side, Khrush-
chev touched off waves of cheers
when he predicted that any future
crisis over Cuba would be deeper
and more dangerous than the
Caribbean blockade showdown of
last October.
After the speech the State De-
partment discounted Khrushchev's
new warning against a United
States attack on Cuba as a speech
"designed to revive the flagging
spirits of the Communists in
Cuba."

Vote Rise
In Ceilng
For Debt
WASHINGTON () - The Sen-
ate Finance Committee, told that
the national debt may break
through the present ceiling next
week, voted yesterday to increase
the limit immediately.
But the committee adopted an
amendment which, if the Senate
approves, will force a Senate-
House conference before the meas-
ure becomes effective. Chairman
Harry F. Byrd (D-Va) said the
Senate would act early next week.
Secretary of the Treasury Doug-
las Dillon told the committee-pres-
ent indications are that the na-
tional debt may exceed the pres-
ent $305 billion ceiling by a week
from tomorrow. He had asked ap-
proval without change of a bill
already passed by the House.
House Clearance
As cleared by the House, the
bill would raise the present ceil-
ing to $307 billion now, and in-
crease it to $309 billion during
May and August.
The Senate adopted 11-2 an'
amendment to extend the $309
billion ceiling through June 30,
1964.
Dillon also conceded under Sen-
ate questioning that if President
John F. Kennedy's tax cut pro-
gram is enacted the government
probably will not have a balanced
budget until fiscal 1967.
Planned Deficits
Byrd said this would mean at
least four years of "deliberately
paauejeq V eAeq IOU 11M aquqod .
had never happened before "in
peacetime in the history of our
country."
Dillon said another increase will
be sought in August, to a level be-
tween,.$315 billion and $320 bil-
lion, regardless of what happens
to the tax cut proposal.
He said enactment of the tax
cut probably would not affect the
debt by more than $2 billion in
fiscal 1964, which begins on July
1.
Permission of a higher debt
level is necessary because the law
which formerly allowed the debt to
reach the proposed height went
out of existence recently.

I
i

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-Ambassa-
dor to the United Nations Adlai
E. Stevenson declared yesterday
the UN is faced by its third big
crisis as the result of the Soviet
Union's newly broadened policy of
non-payment for some United Na-
tions services. Informed sources
said the chief United States dele-
gate told a private meeting of Lat-
in American diplomats that the
situation could be compared only
with Korea in 1950 and the Soviet
campaign for troika in 1960.
The Soviet stand announced
Wednesday was interpreted as a
direct challenge to the United
States position that countries
falling more than two years behind
in their obligations should be de-
prived of their Assembly vote-as
the UN charter provides.
* * *
KATMANDU, Nepal-The Amer-
ican Mt. Everest expedition an-
nounced yesterday that two of its
teams met near the top of the
world's highest peak Wednesday
after scaling it from two different
sides.
LANSING - Republican State
Chairman Arthur Elliott, Jr., yes-
terday urged Democrats to call off
the recount of the vote ratifying
the new state Constitution, saying
that if all the precincts covered
by petitions are recounted it will
cost taxpayers between $80,000-
$90,000.
But Democratic State Chairman
Zolton Ferency rejected the re-
quest, saying, "We are finding nu-
merous irregularities and glaring
errors.
WASHINGTON-Chief Justice
Earl Warren yesterday called for a
national debate on the three pro-
posed "states' rights" amend-
ments to the Constitution. He said
that the proposals could "radically
change the character of our in-
stitutions".yet have had very little
public mention.
Warren was referring to three
amendments which would end all
constitutional restraints on the
way the states apportion'their leg-
islatures, permit amendment of the
Constitution by states alone and
set up a Court of the Union of
the 50 state chief justices to re-
view Supreme Court decisions re-
spectively.

World News Roundup

I

WASHINGTON-The State De-
partment announced Ambassador
Raymond L. Thurston is being re-
called from Port au Prince today
for consultation on future United
States-Haiti relations. The ques-
tion of when and whether Thur-
ston will return to his post was left
open.
* * *
OTTAWA - Canada's Prime
Minister Lester B. Pearson called
in United States Secretary of State
Dean.Rusk yesterday to press for
an end to harassment of Cana-
dian ships in American lake ports
by United States trade unions.
* * *
NEW YORK - The New York
Stock Exchange slipped to a small
loss in moderate trading yester-
day. The Dow Jones averages
showed 30 industrials down 1.46,
20 railroads down .02, 15 utilities
up .43 and 65 stocks down .14.

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'3

CINEMA GUILD-DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
PRESENT
THE FIRST ANN ARBOR
FlpILM FESTIVAL
the programs:
FRIDAY, MAY 24
AT 7:00P.M.

LAST CHANCE!p
For Personal Selection
of Choice Reserved Seats
for APA Membership

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE-Fordel
DIXIE PARADISE-Hitchens
STONE SONATA-D'Avino
METANOI A-Bolotowsky

IMAGE OF THE SEA-Gray
WAITING ROOM-Preston
AUTUMN-Kuiper
JOUR APRES JOUR-Perron

NEXT WEEK ONLY-Mon.-Fri., May 27-31
10 a.m.-1 p.m.-P.T.P. Office--Mendelssohn Theater

AT 9:00 P.M.
THE WINNER-Cyr Films DULCE DOMINGO DULCE-McLucas
CHERRY TREE CAROL-Glascock DANCE SQUARED-Jodoin
ROTATE THE BODY-Tourtelot THE RUNNER-Owen
FILM EXERCISE No. 1-Glascock BLOOD AND FIRE
TORONTO JAZZ-Owen

JUNE, JULY, AUGUST:

MAIL ORDERS ONLY

RESERVE NOW FOR THE'1963-64 SEASON!

SATURDAY, MAY 25
AT 7:00 P.M.
VENEZIE-Sol Films
PATI NOI RE-Carle
LES INFANTS DU SILENCE-
Broit and Jutra

How to spend a weekend
in Chicago for $15

LONELY BOY-Koenig & Kroiter
ARK-Sol Films
THANATOPSIS-Emshwiller
SUNDAY ON THE RIVER-Hitchens

TOM CHERRY
U. of Kentucky.
Lexington. Ky.
Says, "Any
student, man
or woman, can
stay at
Chicago's
YMCA Hotel
and enjoy a
weekend for
$15.00. Here is
how I did it,"

P.M. Dinner at YMCA Hotel $1.15
Chicago Symphony 2.50
Coke .10
Room at Y Hotel 2.78

AT 9:00 P.M.
WORLD 8 MM FILM FESTIVAL
EXTENSIONS: AN ACT FOR ASSEMBLY-Milton Cohen
THE BOTTLEMAN and MEANWHILE, A TWO-PIECE
by George Manupelli
SUNDAY, MAY 26
AT 7:00 P.M.
FORGET ME NOT-Cyr Films
MR. H AYASH I TH E GYMNASTS
HAVE YOU THOUGHT OF TALKING TO THE DIRECTOR
THE CLASSROOM A HURRAH FOR SOLDIERS
-all by Bruce Baillie
TO L.A. WITH LUST and LEMON HEARTS by Zimmerman
AT 9:00 P.M.

Sat. A.A. Breakfast at Y Hotel
Art Institute Tour
lunch at bamboo Inn
Sat. P.M. Nat. Hiss. Museum Tour
Dinner at Y Hotel
f Saft. nit. dance, Y Hotel

.58
Free
1.45
Fre
1.15
.10
AS
2.72

Coke date
Room at Y Hotel

Sun. A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Worship at Central Church
Lunch at Y Hotel 1.3S

11 19-p tw. *311 ROFESSIONAL.

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