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May 21, 1963 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AY, MAY 21, 1963

THE MICHIGANTfAiTV

1ViliV«1 LL'lll/1

PAGE!

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e tmen Might Have Won If

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KATZENMEYER'S DECISION:
Conservative Golf Blamed for Defeat

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By TOM ROLAND
Michigan's tennis team is willing
to acknowledge that they were
beaten out of first place in the
Big Ten tennis championships last
weekend 73-42 by a better North-
western team, but the Wolverines
can't help thinking about all those
"if's" .that might have changed
the point picture.
If third man John Fraser hadn't
been stricken with a fever that
forced Michigan to forfeit in the
first doubles semifinals and in
third singles consolations. If Ray
Senkowski could have scored the
crucial point in the second set of
his finals Match with Northwest-
ern's Marty Riessen, that would
have all but assured a Wolverine
victory in first singles.
If Ron Linclau hadn't been
severely handicapped with pulled
back muscles that cost him the
sixth singles championship. If
Michigan could have won any of
the finals matches that went three
sets.
Two More
If Iowa's Steve Wilkinson had
come through with the two points
that separated him from beating
Riessen in the semi-finals. If, if,
if .
Unfortunately the "if's" don't
count when the points are being
added up, and the Wolverines were
forced to settle for second place,
the first time since 1958 that
Michigan has been absent from the
championship spot. The conference
title was Northwestern's first since
1950.
Wildcat head coach Clare Ries-
sen had winners in six of the nine
meet divisions, including a pair
of double-titlists in his son Marty
and Clark Graebner. Graebner
took the second singles crown and
then teamed with Riessen to cop
the first doubles medal.
Riessen received a good scare
from Iowa's Wilkinson in the semi-
finals but pulled out a 6-3, 4-6,
8-6 win and then had to go even
a longer way to oust Senkowski
in the finals.
Almost Good
The Wolverine senior broke
Riessen's service in the first game
and followed to take the first set,
6-2, twice coming' from behind
0-40 scores with Riessen serving to
pick up games. In the second
stanza there were no service breaks
until the score was 5-4 when Ries-
sen took it to win the set.
Senkowski had a 30-40 lead inI
the second set with the score 3-3
on Riessen's serve but barely miss-
ed a clinching shot, the ball Just
clipping the top of the net. The
Wolverine first man, who hadt
trouble with l'iis first serve allr

during the match, lost out on
several points after that as the
ball just barely caught the net
and dropped back.
Riessen won the third set, 6-1,
stopping Senkowski's service with
the score 1-2.
A painful back beat Linclau out
of the sixth singles medal. Pulled
muscles that had been bothering
him throughout the season showed
up just after'Linclau had trounced
Wildcat Skip Gage in the first
set, 6-1, and had gained a 3-1
lead in the second. Gage then won
the second and third sets, 6-3, 6-3.
Serve Working
Linclau had been serving some
great games the day before, as he
and Senkowski played their semi-
final matches indoors. The courts
were hard and fast, and Linclau's
tough service stopped Illinois' Don
Hedden, 6-0, 6-2.
Fraser remained at the North-
western health center with a high
fever when the Michigan team re-
turned to Ann Arbor Saturday
after the meet. He had been de-
feated in the first round by the
eventual third singles champion,
Northwestern's Ken Paulson.
Michigan came home with only
one first-place medal, with captain
Harry Fauquier and Hal Lowe
pairing up to take the second
doubles title. Fauquier lost to
Graebner in the second singles
final match after putting up a
tough, three-set battle. Lowe was

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By GARY WINER
Although high winds played an
important role in Saturday's final
round of the conference golf
tournament, Michigan's golf coach
Bert Katzenmeyer still shouldered
most of the blame for his team's
disappointing fourth place finish.
"Looking back on things," Kat-
zenmeyer commented, "we should
have attacked the course in a
much different manner than the
way we did. This was my fault."
Katzenmeyer was referring to
his decision last week to play the
Madison Maple Bluff Golf Course
conservatively rather than a "go
for broke" type golf. Because eight
holes on the course had out of
bounds situations, Katzenmeyer
had decided on playing these holes
safely rather than risk picking up

HARRY FAUQUIER
... tennis captain titlist

Sport Shorts

two penalty strokes by shooting
for birdies.
"After seeing the course for the
first time Thursday, we discussed
the rounds the team had played
that day at our meeting. This was
the line of strategy we agreed
upon," he continued. "The only
trouble was that we took about as
many strokes as everyone else did
the first day; however, teams like
Wisconsin and Minnesota had
gone out of bounds more than we
had. Our main problem was that
by playing it safe we were getting
into more trouble with trees and
sand bunkers.
Michigan held the first day lead
on a tremendous surge in the af-
ternoon. Gary Mouw paced the
team after lunch with a 1-under
par 71 while teammates Captain
Chuck Newton and Tom Pendle-
bury carded 72 and 73 respectively.
At the end of the two rounds, the
Wolverines held a slim two stroke
lead over host Wisconsin. Michi-
gan was in with a 758 total while
Minnesota was third at 763.
On the second day the Wolver-
ines fell apart and tumbled to
fourth place. Dave Cameron had
a 71 in the morning along with
Mouw's 75, but the other scores
slipped the remainder of the day.
Wisconsin, with its 14 stroke lead
at the 54-hole mark also fell apart
and wound up second behind Min-
nesota's 1523 winning total. Wis-
consin was in with 1524 strokes;
Purdue was, third at 1529; while
the Wolverines took 1537 shots.
Katzenmeyer commented on the
second day's scores. "I only wish
we hadn't been leading at the half-
way point. Every year the first
round is bad for everyone because
the initial pressure of the tourna-
ment is great, but the team with

that first day lead hasn't lost any
of the pressure by the next morn-
ing. Our boys were wound up
tighter than a drum, he stated.
"Once you're ahead, you try to
keep the lead and then get your-
self into trouble. Look at Wiscon-
sin. Roger Eberhardt (eventual
medalist winner at 292) was so
busy protectingrhis nine shot lead
at the end of the third round that
he forgot entirely about his team."
Eberhardt took78 strokes in the
afternoon when he had rounds of
73-73-68 previously.
Katzenmeyer continued, "Min-
nesota was back of the pack and
came from behind. There's quite
a difference in playing to protect
a lead and by saying to yourself
'we're behind, now let's get going'."
To date, there are no plans to
send the team to the NCAA Golf
Tournament at Wichita, Kansas,
June 23-29.

L

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CLEVELAND (P) - Arthur B.
Modell, president of the Cleve-
land Brown, announced Monday
formation of the Ernie Davis
Leukemia Foundation to help in
the battle against the deadly blood
disease that claimed the life of
the 23-year-old Negro football
player.
Contributions may be sent to
the foundation in Cleveland.
Modell said he received a tele-
gram from Sen. Kenneth B. Keat-
ing (R-NY) endorsing the plan.
* *
WASHINGTON (P) - Sen. Ken-
neth B. Keating (R-NY) renewed
his call for, a "master plan" to
conquer cancer in a Senate tribute
Monday to the late Ernie Davis,
former All-America halfback from
Syracuse University.
Keating voiced a "deep sense of
loss and profound regret" over
the death Saturday of the 23-year-
old Negro football star after a 13-
month battle against leukemia.
"Cancer, in all of its forms,
must be conquered," the senator
declared. He urged a White House
conference on cancer "to form a
master plan for further govern-
ment action."
He and Sen. Jacob K. Javits
(R-NY) joined in endorsing a pro-
posal- of the Cleveland Browns to
establish an Ernie Davis Founda-
tion for Leukemia Research, and
Davis' mother's request that con-
tributions be sent to Western Re-
serve University's research center
for this purpose, in lieu of flow-
ers.
ELMIRA, N. Y. (JP)-Pupils at
Elmira Free Academy observed
a minute of silence Monday in
memory of Ernie Davis, who be-
gan an athletic career there that
carried him to the pinnacle of col-
legiate football in 1961.
The tribute was one of many
for the former Syracuse Univer-
sity All-America halfback who
was the first Negro to win the
Heisman Trophy as the nation's
outstanding college football play-
er two seasons ago.
All athletic events scheduled for
Tuesday for teams of the city's
three high schools were canceled.
Flags at schools and city build-
ings were flown at half-staff.

A committee was organized to
plan a memorial to Davis, who
died Saturday in Cleveland of
acute leukemia at the age of 23.
Davis had signed an $80,000 con-
tract to play for the Browns. He
never did, however, since the leu-
kemia was discovered last sum-
mer.
Davis' body will lie in state, be-
ginning Tuesday at the Neighbor-
hood House, where he played bas-
ketball before entering high
school.
* *
MILWAUKEE (P) - A char-
tered plane carrying the Cincin-
nati Reds baseball team from St.
Louis to Milwaukee made a forced
landing at Chicago's O'Hare Air-
port Monday after developing
trouble in one of four engines.
Avery Robbins, Red's traveling
secretary, said the pilot of the
United Air Lines ship feathered
the prop of the dead engine after
it started throwing oil. The plane
was about 15 minutes out of St.
Louis when trouble developed,
Robbins said, and continued on
three engines.
The team was transferred to an-
other DC-7 in Chicago and flew to
Milwaukee.
1-M SCORES
FRATERNITY
Lambda Chi Alpha "B" 12, Phi
Gamma Delta 9
Pi Lambda Phi "B" (won by forfeit)
RESIDENCE HALL
Cooley "A" 23, Van Tyne 3
Huber "A" 7, Gomberg 1
Michigan "A" (won by forfeit)
Cooley "B" 3, Allen-Rumsey 2
Huber "B" 10, Reeves 5
Gomberg "B" 39, Greene 3
U

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HAL LOWE
... second doubles win

Major League
Standings

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defeated by Michigan State's
Dwight Shelton in the fifth singles
semi-finals, again in three sets.
MSU Falls
If the second-place finish was
tough for Michigan to take, the
meet was even more disappoint-
ing for a Michigan State team
that was going strong in third
place but fell, to a late Indiana
rally. The Spartans had two play-
ers in the finals, and perhaps
MSU coach Stan Drobac could
have expected Jack Damson to lose
to favored Paulson of Northwest-
ern in third singles. But, while
Damson did put up a tough first
but lost, 6-8 6-3, 6-2, the real
disappointment was on the fifth
court where Indiana's Charles
Fichter beat Shelton, 8-10, 6-4,
6-3.

Delicious Hamburgers 15c
Hot Tasty French Fries 12c
Triple Thick Shakes. . 20c

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AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Baltimore 22 15 .595
Chicago 22 15 .595
New York 18 13 .81
Boston 19 14 .576
Kansas City 20 15 .571
Cleveland 16 16 .500
Los Angeles 18 23 .439
Minnesota 15 21 .417
Detroit 14 21 .400
Washington 14 25 .359
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 5, Washington 4
Baltimore 6, Detroit 0
Minnesota 6, Boston 5
Cleveland 7, Los Angeles 5
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at Boston (n)
Kansas City at New York (n)
Los Angeles at Cleveland (n)
Chicago at Washington (n)
Detroit at Baltimore (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
San Francisco 24 15 .615
Los Angeles 23 16 .590
Chicago 19 18 .514
St. Louis 20 '19 .513
Milwaukee 19 20 487
Cincinnati 17 18 .486
Pittsburgh 17 19 .472
Philadelphia 17 20 .459
Houston 18 22 .450
New York 16 23 .410

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