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May 11, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

z, MAY 11, 1963

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I

REVIEWS CONVENTION:
Sturm Notes 'Conservatism'

rI

of Con-Con Delegates

By RAYMOND HOLTON
Delegates to last year's Con-
stitutional Convention "displayed
a natural conservatism in making
changes in the basic law of the
state," Prof. Albert L. Sturm of
Florida State University notes in
"Constitution-Making in Michigan
1961-62," recently published by
the Institute for Public Adminis-
tration.
He points out that the resulting
document retains such "traditional
practices" as the bi-cameral legis-
lature, the 15-mill property tax
limitation, the four-cent ceiling
on the state sales tax and initia-
tiye and referendum.
Prof. Sturm also cites the re-
tention of the traditional forms
of local government, constitution-
al status for state colleges and
universities, civil service and pro-
tection of personal and property
rights.
Several Innovations
However, he notes several in-
novations in the document, in-
cluding the consolidation of some
120 state agencies into a maximum
of 20 departments, the extention
of the terms of major elective of-
ficers to four years, the abolition
of justice of the peace courts and
the liberalization of debt limita-
tions.
"It is not a model," Prof. Sturm
says, "nor does it go as far as
a whole, in accepting the more
advanced proposals for stream-
lining the machinery of govern-
ment and adopting it to the needs
of the 1960's and future decades as
some other new state constitu-
tions."
Writing a "model" constitution
or an "ideal document" is of little
lasting value, he asserts. The con-
stitution-making process should be
a "very practical process that is
necessarily molded by tradition
and political forces and experi-
ence."
"Reflects Environment"
Prof. Sturm notes that the
document "reflects the political

The major concern of the Demo-
crats was reapportionment of leg-
islative districts and "developments
on this matter greatly affected
their stands on other issues," he
says.
Three Groups
Prof. Sturm divides the Re-
publicans into three groups-con-
servatives, moderates and liberals.
The conservative faction consisted
of strong outstate, rural repre-
sentation and lawyers and leaders
of the Farm Bureau. "This group,"
he comments, "fared remarkably
well, being able to retain many
of the constitution's traditional
values."
The largest Republican group
was the moderates, prominently
led by Gov. George Romney, then
a convention vice-president. The
liberals sought a model document
and "ideal solutions to state prob-
lems." Prof. Sturm lists Prof.
James K. Pollack of the political
science department as a member
of that wing.
Reviewing Michigan's constitu-
tion history, Prof. Sturm finds
that the state "has been more
active than most states in con-
stitution making." The first docu-
ment was drawn up in 1835 and
five others have been submitted
to the voters.
Prof. Sturm points out the basic
political and economic issues that
eventually led to constitutional
reform. In 1910 "more than half

of the population lived in rural
areas; by 1960, almost three-
fourths of it was urban, with 53
per cent of the people living in
four southeastern Michigan coun-
ties.
Also, Sturm noted that "by 1959
the state was faced with a finan-
cial crisis of the first prder." The
inability of the Republican Legis-
lature and Democratic Gov. G.
Mennen Williams to agree on a
tax program was the immediate
reason for the crisis, he writes.

See Tropic Star only at these
Authorized Artearved Jewelers

CON-CON-President Dwight D. Eisenhower addresses Michigan's Constitutional Convention in
its opening phase. After hearing varied advice; the delegates settled down to five months of hard
debate and decisions.

Jewelers Name
Rene's Jewelry
Daniel's Jewelry
Sageman Jewelry
Daniel's Jewelryt
Manasse, William

Town
Alpena
Ann Arbor
Bad Axe
Co. Battle Creek
Caro

environment in which it was wyit-
ten" as well as the current think-
ing of experts in state' government
and administration.
The new constitution, like the
federal Constitution, is the result
of compromises, he points out. The
compromises are not only between
the Republicans and Democrats,
but within the party delegations
themselves.
Surveying the 99 Republican, 45
Democrat delegate convention,
Prof. Sturm finds that lawyers
were the largest occupational
group represented. Fifty-seven
delegates were lawyers.
Male, White, Protestant
The make-up of the convention
was predominately male, white and,
Protestant. Most delegates were
from the middle and uppermiddle
income brackets with 68 in the
$7500 to $15000 income range.
There were 11 women delegates,

13 Negroes and 35 non-Protestants
out of the total 144 delegates.
Seventy-one delegates were col-
lege graduates while 24 had never
gone to college,.
Viewing the convention's fac-
tional make-up, Prof. Sturm finds
that the two-to-one Republican
majority "affords an incomplete

view of the role played by various
factions, blocs and groups in mold-
ing the new document."
"The Democrats were a much
more homogeneous group than the
Republicans, with all but four
coming from the Detroit metro-
politan area where the labor in-
fluence was dominant,"

Dearborn Jewelers Dearborn
Crown Credit JewelersDetroit
Sallan Inc. Detroit
Hatfield Jewelers Flint
Herkner Jewelry Co. Grand Rapids
Krombeen Jewelry Grand Rapids
Swierenga Jeweler Grand Rapids
Miller Jewelers Hastings
Max's Jewelry Hamtramck
Millers Jewelry Hancock
Meagher's Jewelers,
Inc. Jackson

World News Roundup

i
i

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United
States and South Viet Nam yester-
day agreed on a cost-sharing for-
mula which will speed the flow
of United States food and equip-
ment to the growing number of
strategic hamlets in that country.
South Viet Nam will pay the local
costs o about $17 million per
year.
WASHINGTON - The Cuban
crisis last fall "increased the lev-
el of command and control of
military operations from Wash-
ington," Vice Adm. Alfred G. Ward
said yesterday. He said coordinat-
ing national efforts is a job for
the whole government. The com-

mander of the Atlantic Second
Fleet declared "The necessity for
coordinating the whole resources
of a nation toward a specific ob-
jective has become too vast to be
handled effectively by one class
of leaders. It has become the re-
sponsibility of the whole people
and the government. As French
Premier Georges Clemenceau put
it in the First World War, 'war is
much too serious a matter to be
entrusted to generals'."
, * *
HOT SPRINGS, Va.-Sen. Hen-
ry M. Jackson (D-Wash) caution-
ed the White House yesterday
against offering any further major
concessions to Russia in hope of
salvaging a nuclear test ban.

I

(Author of "I Was a Teen-age Dwarf," "The Many
Loves of Dobie Gilis," etc.)

Jackson counseled a policy of
firmness and military strength.
* * *
LONDON-British Labor Party
leader Harold Wilson hailed yes-
terday sweeping Laborite gains in
borough and urban council elec-
tions as clear notice for Prime
Minister Harold Macmillan's Con-
servative government to quit.
LANSING-The state Supreme
Court stayed the controversial
Saturday or Sunday closing law
yesterday pending a decision on
its constitutionality. Washtenaw
County is one of 11 counties that
has adopted the local option law.
*' * *
NEW YORK-The New York
Stock Exchange showed a resurg-
ence of lower-priced issues in a
late rally yesterday. The Dow-
Jonesaverages indicated 30 in-
dustrials up 1.33, 20 rails up .20,
15 utilities up .27 and 65 stocks up
.44.

Is Tropic Star foryou?
College girls seem to know what they want. We get a lot of
ideas about ring styling from American campuses. If there is
such a thing as a consensus, it would sound like this: conserva.
tive styling, with a difference.'
That's what we've designed into Tropic Star...the newest of
the beautiful Artcarved diamond engagement rings. Like all
Artcarved rings, it's styled for lasting beauty... guaranteed in
writing for permanent value. Is Artcarved's beautiful new
Tropic Star for you? See for yourself. .RAO9RAA

Miller Jewelers
of Jackson, Inc. Jackson
Ray D. Pixler Kalamazoo
Carl V. Reek Kalamazoo
Walter E. Ring Kalamazoo
Daniel's Jewelry Lansing
Heaths Jewelry Store Lansing
Morgan's Jewelry Co. Lansing
Schohl Jewelry Ludington
Nyquist Jewelry Marquette
Thompson's Jewelry At. Pleasant
Marvin Jewelers Muskegon
Morgan's Jewelers Muskegon
Connolly's Jewelers Pontiac
Lou-Mor Jewelers Pontiac
Myer's Jewelry Shop Royal Oak
Daniel's Jewelry Co. Saginaw
Green's Jewelry St. Joseph

QP)

i

HOW TO SEE EUROPE.
FOR ONLY $300 A DAY: NO. 2
Last week we discussed England, the first stop on the tour of
Europe that every American college student is going to make
this summer. Today we will take up your next stop--Frane,
or the Pearl of the Pacific, as it is generally called.
To get from England to France, one greases one's body and
swims the English Channel. Similarly, to get from France to
Spain, one greases one's body and slides down the Pyrenees.
And, of course, to get from France to Switzerland, one greases
one's body and wriggles through the Simplon Tunnel. Thus, as
you can see, the most important single item to take to Europe
is a valise full of grease.
No, I am wrong. The most important thing to take to Europe
is a valise full of Marlboro Cigarettes-or at least as many as

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'

r

rtc arved

Diamond and Wedding Rings

Jean's Jewelry Store
Earl Cobb, Jewelers

s, GltSte.Marie
Traverse City

(Continued from Page 2)
Sprucewood Lodge, Maine - Position
open for a recreation director of resort.
Male pref.
Camp Easter Seal Summer Treatment
Camp, Va.--Position open for student in
occupational therapy to work under a
registered therapist.
City of Adrian, Mch.-Positions open
for construction inspection & other
duties related to engrg for the com-
ing summer. Civil Engrg. students who
will have completed their junior yr. id
June are eligible.
Systems Research Labs, Dayton, Ohio
SHE'L W NyT
tightes slacks ever created.
pockets, unique comb buck
pockets wth comb. Lw on
the hips and they taper
down to a 13 inch cuffless
bottom. Yours in Olive,
Black, Midnight, Coal Grey',
Buy them now! 7'
NO 7
C 0. D.' e
ORDER BY COLOR
AND WAIST SIZE

-Position open for Electrical Engineer
with good background in mathematics
to assist ingresearch. Equivalent of a
Masters Degree is required. Details are
available at the Summer Placement
S~rvice.
For further information, please come
to Summer Placement.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Placement
Office, 220 Student Activities Bldg.,
during the following hours: Mon. thru
Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Bob Cope,
Part-time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
-Several miscellaneous jovs available.
1-Gymnastics instructor or someone
with gymnastic experience to work
in a reducing salon 2 nights per
week.
5-Life guards with their Senior Life.
Saving Certificate. 15 or more hours
per week. Transportation is needed.
FEMALE
2-Technical-typists who have had ex-
perience on a typewriter with an
interchangeable keyboard. 20 to 30
hours per week.
1-Registered Nurse to draw blood from
patients. Must have experience.
Ralf-time position, 7:45 to 12 noon,
starting as soon as possible work-
ing through Augusta y
1-Fast, accurate typist who can type
in Spanish and/or French. 20 to 40
hours per week.
Gr VerMOt2

lol Iiii ii- iii

COME

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURC
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets'
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Open House for news
dents at Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Tuesday, 12:00 noon-Luncheon and Disc
sion.

TH E
H LUTHERAN STUDENT
AND CHAPEL

CENTER

CZ4,

alfrducd ~ior 15 2 Pdi

the customs regulations will allow. And if by chance you should
run out of Marlboros in Europe, do not despair. That familiar
red and white Marlboro package is as omnipresent in Europe
as it is in all fifty of the United States. And it is the same
superb cigarette you find at home-the same pure white filter,
the same zestful, mellow blend of tobaccos preceding the filter.
This gem of the tobacconist's art, this prodigy of cigarette
engineering, was achieved by Marlboro's well-known research
team-Fred Softpack and Walter Fliptop-and I, for one, am
grateful.
ButI digress. We were speaking of France-or the Serpent of
the Nile, as it is popularly termed.
Let us first briefly sum up the history of France. The nation
was discovered in 1066 by Madame Guillotine. There followed
a series of costly wars with Schleswig-Holstein, the Cleveland
Indians, and Jean Jacques Rousseau. Stability finally came to
this troubled land with the coronation of Marshal Foch, who
married&Lorraine Alsace and had three children: Flopsy, Mopsy,
and Charlemagne: This later became known as the Petit Trianon.
Marshal Foch-or the Boy Orator of the Platte, as he was
affectionately called-was succeeded by Napoleon, who intro-
duced shortness to France. Until Napoleon the French were
the tallest nation in Europe. After Napoleon most Frenchmen
were able to walk comfortably under card tables. This later
became known as the Hunchback of Notre Dame.
Napoleon, after his defeat by Credit Mobilier, was exiled to
Elba, where he made the famous statement, "Able was I ere I
saw Elba." This sentence reads the same whether you spell it
forward or backward. You can also spell Marlboro backward-
Oroblram. Do not, however, try to smoke Marlboro backward"
because that undoes all the pleasure of the finest cigarette made.
After Napoleon's death the French people fell into a great fit
of melancholy, known as the Louisiana Purchase. For over a
century everyone sat around moping and refusing his food.
This torpor was not lifted until Eiffel built his famous tower,
which made everybody giggle so hard that today France is the
avest dcou1nt in-Euronp

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Donald Postema, Minister
Washtenow at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Studyr
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 o.m. Churc, School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild

National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Anno M. Lee, Associate
SUNDAY.
9:30 and 1 1:00 a.m. Worship Service.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
7:00 p.m. "Questions About Christianity."
Student Panel.
WEDNESDAY-7:15 p.m. Vespers.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2.4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30.

Presbyterian Campus CenterI
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt andI
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580

located at the
Patricia Pickett

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Compus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship. "So Long as There Are Homes," ser-
mon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA (1290
AM 102.9 FM) 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, Pine Room. "Prayers of
Social Atin.
5:30 p.m.-Student Cabinet, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. The Newman Club will present
"The Ecumenical Council."
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m.-Class: "Evangelists for the Un-
dergraduates? Camus, Sallinger Golding
and Becket," Wesley Lounge.
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Jean Robe's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
7:30 a.m.-Breakfast, Pine Room.
4:00 p.m.-Student Coffee Hour.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Grads, Picnic Supper,
THURSDAY
7:30 p.m.-Kappa Phi Initiation, Chapel.
8:00 p.m.-Koppa Phi' Dessert, Lounge.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon
day thru Saturday 10:00 am. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Erwin A. Goede, minister
Services and Church School at 9:30 and 11:00
a.m. "The Family: For Better or For
Worse."
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "The Needed
Woman," Mrs. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40 a.m. Mr. Curtis
E. Bottum, Jr.
Church School, crib-9th grade: 9:30 and
11:00.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, 2-5189.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
A if..A Tr n _S i Ptar

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPALL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-

I

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER

it

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