100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 04, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Duvalier Regime
Deel~res Cur few,
-t
Sets Martial Law
PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti ?oP)-Haitian President Francois Du-
valler's regime declared martial law in Haiti yesterday.
It imposed an 8 p.m.-5 a.m. curfew, effective last night. No reason
was given for the measures announced over a local radio station and*
their was no unusual military activity' immediately apparent in the
capital.
However, underground oppositionists have vowed to overthrow
the Duvaller government by May 15. The decree, in effect, places
"unrestrained powers in Duvalier's
hands. However, he has ruled in
recent years with a -minimum of
restraints.
In Washington, sources reported
{f that Duvalier has mounted a reign,
of terror in cluding murder, tor-
...... ....ture, arson, widespread arrests apd
a sweeping purge of military of-
fivers.
The state department announc-
ed meanwhile that the United
States ambassador to 'Port au
| Prince is scheduled to return to
Washington for "regular consul-
tation"-but may postpone the
:visit if the Haitian trouble gets

Egyptians
Withdraw,
Soldiers
CAIRO (P)-Acclaimed as vic-
tors, Egyptian troops began re-
turning yesterday from Yemen
where their presence once threat-
ened to spread the flames of con-
flict through the Middle East.
About 2000 troops from Yemen
shouting "Nasser, Nasser," landed
at the quarantine port of El Tor.
They were greeted by Gen. Aly
Amer, chief of staff, who called
them "victorious troops who have
achieved a twentieth century
miracle."
In the sense that Egyptian
President Gamal Abdel Nasser got
essentially what he wanted, there
is no doubt the 28,000 men he
sent to Yemen did gain him a vic-
tory.
Field Marshal
When Yemeni Col. Abdullah Al-
Sallal - who, has now promoted
himself to field marshal and pro-
claimed himself president-broke
through the mud walls of San'a
and took the Yemeni capital last
September, Nasser's stock was at
a low ebb.
Syria had seceded from his
United Arab Republic. Premier
Abdel Karim Kassen was in power
in Iraq and hurling imprecations
at Cairo.
Within the 13-state Arab league
Egypt was so isolated it boycotted
meetings.
Sallal's espousal of Nasser's slo-
gans on San'a radio started a swift
tide that now has put Nasser un-
contestably again on top of the
Arab world. His enemies are
isolated and such states as Sudan,
Lebanon, Kuwait, and Libya are
more cowed than ever.
Nasser Victory
The withdrawal agreement was
an obvious Nasser victory. He
agreed to phase out his troops-.
leaving an unspecified number in
Yemen for training and the secur-
ity of Sallal's regime.
In return, Saudi Arabia has
agreed to cease aiding the ousted
monarch, Imam Mohammed Al-
Badr, and to permit a UN inspec-
tion team into the Saudi-Yemen
border zone.
Badr still holds an appreciable
amount of mountain territory and'
maintains the shifting loyalty of
many feudal tribesmen. But the
effect of the agreement is almost
sure to end his chances of a suc-
cessful counterstroke.

Britain, U.S.,

India Set

On Arms Aid Program
NEW DELHI (Y)-The United States, Britain and India were re-
ported in substantial agreement last night on arms aid India needs to
meet the challenge from Red China.
But American sources indicated a crisis in the India-Pakistan
talks on Kashmir may complicate the Indian buildup.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk discussed both Kashmir and the
Chinese threat with Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru at
-ae r- j'a 95-minute meeting in the after-

BRITISH NUCLEAR ARMS:
Churchill Criticizes Opposition

1
7
1
J
i
17
i7
1
£ .
I

DEAN RUSK
... arms aid to India

FRANCOIS DUVALIER
. martial law, purges
Senate Group
Gives Increase
To Post Office
WASHINGTON (I)-Postmaster
General J. Edward Day won agree-
ment from the $enate Appropria-
tions Committee yesterday to re-
store $50 million of the $69.8 mil-
lion the House sliced off his oper-
ating budget for the next year.
But Treasury Secretary Douglas
Dillon, fighting to get back at
least $30 million which he says is
necessary to hire enough Internal
Revenue agents to catch tax evad-
ers, was voted only $9.2 million.
If Day's victory stands, sena-
tors said, it should enable him to
halt plans to cut Saturday deliv-
eries and force some office dwell-
ers and new homeowners to call
at post offices for their mail.
The big question was whether
the House would back down, since,
the Senate usually goes along with'
its appropriations committee. The
committee agreed that thi!$50 mil-
lion was, a rock bottom figure for
which it would fight indefinitely
with House conferees.
However, the chairman of the
subcommittee which handled the
bill, Sen. A. Willis Robertson (D-
Va), noted that in past showdowns
with House conferees the best he
had been able to salvage was res-
toration of about half the amounts
cut by the House.
Day's pronouncement that he
will have to reduce some postal
services unless he gets the money
he says he needs has been de-
nounced by some House members.

worse.
'Tense Situation'
Press Officer Lincoln White said
Ambassador Raymond L. Thurs-j
ton had planned some time ago to
return to Washington May 10. But
whether the ambassador will re-
turn on schedule depends on the
Haitian situation, which has been
"tense for the past 10 days or so
and might possibly worsen,"- he
said. '
In any event, White indicated
the United States envoy will boy-
cott the May 15 Port au Prince
celebration of Duvalier's inagura-
tion six years ago. Thurston stay-
ed away from last year's ceremon-
ies, too, because of Washington's
growing dislike for Duvalier's rule.
The Organization of American
States made public, meanwhile, a
message it received from the mis-
sion it sent to investigate the
tension between the Dominican
Republic and Haiti. The message.
was sent from Port au Prince last
night before the group left for the
Dominican Republic.
Concerned on Fate
The message, from Mission
Chairman Alberto Zuleta Angel of
Columbia, said the group is con-
cerned about the fate of Haitian
nationals who have taken refuge
in foreign diplomatic missions.
Zuleta said although his group
gives full credit to the promises
of the Haitian government for the
refugees' safety, the mission hopes
the OAS will .continue to watch
the situation with unflagging zeal.
Reports from Port Au Prince
said there were few signs of ten-
sions on the surface, but there was
a strong undercurrent of unrest.
Responsible sources felt the situ-
ation might explode if the opposi-
tion finds a guidcng force.
Informants added, however, that
Duvalier's crackdown has been so
widespread the opposition may be
unable to mount a formidable
challenge now. ''hey also belittled
Duvalier's claims of popular sup-
port and said most of the 10,000
demonstrators who hailed Duva-
lier Tuesday had been carted into
the city in trucks and buses.

i

World News
Roundup __

W.M-

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW - Reports persisted
yesterday that Frol Kozlov, Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev's
designated successor, is ill. But
some sources insisted he is on va-
cation. Kozlov failed to show up
for either of the big Red Square
demonstrations this week, the one
for, Cuban Premier Fidel Castro
Sunday and the May Day parade.
LANSING-Gov. George Rom-
ney's long promised charges and
alleged evidence that opponents
of the new constitution waged a
war of distortion and lies were
in the hands of the Fair Campaign
Practices Commission. In a let-
ter to FCPC Secretary Walter
Klein, Romney accused the docu-
ment's foes of "an unprecedented
campaign designed to create con-
fusion, doubt and fear which re-
sulted in 'no' votes on election
day."
PROVIDENCE, R.I.-The Rhode
Island House passed a state lot-
tery bill by a substantial margin
yesterday. However, the measure
-which proposes repeal of. the
state constitutional ban on lot-
teries - is expected to run into
trouble in the Senate.
* * *
PITTSBURGH-David J. Mc-
Donald, president of the United
Steelworkers Union, discounted
published reports yesterday that
an agreement is near with the
leading steel producers. "No deci-
sions have been reached," he said.
All other reports are speculative.
We have said repeatedly that our
ultimate course will be decided by
the wage policy committee. That
committee has not been summon-
ed.
s *
NEW YORK-The New York
Stock Exchange eased back irreg-
ularly yesterday from its latest
1963 peaks in moderately active
trading. The Dow Jones average
for 30 industrials was down 3.01,
20 railroads down 0.45, 15 utilities
up 0.52 and 65 stocks down 0.54.

Differences
On Weapons
Still Persist
LONDON-There are sharp dif-
ferences between India on the one
hand and the United States and
Britain on the other over the ques-
tion of the longterm military aid
that India is seeking from the
West.
According to reliable sources
here, these are the major differ-
ences:
1) The "immediacy" of the Chi-
nese Communist menace. The In-
dians are reported to have pre-
sented a case for military aid bas-
ed on the idea that China may
soon mount another heavy at-
tack. The thinking of the Britons
and Americans is that the Indians
are wrong about this and that the
Chinese will rest for some time
with the fruits of last year's in-
vasion.
Quoted No Figures
2) India's capacity to absorb
and use the huge amount of arma-
ments she is seeking is doubted by
Washington and London. Esti-
mates of the value of the equip-
ment India is asking for range up
to $2 billion, although the Indians
have never quoted a figure in their
talks with the United States and
Britain.
3) The United States and Brit-
ain believe that India still has
military resources facing Pakistan
that could be shifted, considerably
reducing her needs for Western
help on the Chinese frontier.
The sources here said that In-
dian Prime Minister Jawaharlal
Nehru was technically correct in
saying that the question of mili-
tary aid had not been conditioned
on agreement by India and Paki-
stan to settle the Kashmir issue.
Avoided Issues
Putting the argument as Nehru
did, the sources added, avoided the
specific issues between India and
the West.
Britain's John Strachey, the La-
bor opposition's spokesman on
Commonwealth affairs, had asked
Prime Minister Harold Macmillan
to what extent military aid to In-
dia had been conditioned on a
settlement of the Kashmir dispute.
Macmillan replied that the United
States and Britain had expressed
the hope that a new settlement at-
tempt would be made.
"That is still our attitude,"
Macmillan said. "No decision on
long-term military aid has been
taken yet."
Copyright, 1963, The New York Times
Switch Schools
In .Bus Protest
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. ()-
Catholic parents stepped up trans-
fers of their children from paro-
chial to, public schools in central
Missouri yesterday to dramatize
their discontent with the state
legislature's refusal to grant them
free bus service.
Some 260 children from three
parishes transferred to public
schools Tursday and yesterday
and others were reported ready to
make the change.
Some of the parents said it was
a temporary change to point up
the problem.

noon.
Rusk described the meeting as a
pleasant talk. He flew here after
talks in Karachi with Pakistani
President Mohammed Ayub Khan,
who forcefully reiterated Paki-
stan's fears that Western arms
aid to India for its defense against
Red China might be used against
Pakistan.
Canadian Aid Also
After the Red Chinese invasion
of North India last fall, the United
States, Britain and Canada began
rushing $120 million in arms aid
to India. They are now considering
a long-range program to help In-
dia double its army strength to
more than one million men by
1965.
Some reports described India's
initial arms requests as out of pro-
portion to what it could use mean-
ingfully, and Britain was described
as reluctant to meet them. How-
ever, informed sources said con-
sidered judgment had brought
about a reasonable Indian request
for help.
No Disagreement
Lord Mountbatten, Britain's
chief of the defense staff, discuss-
ed the arms aid with India's De-
fense Minister Y. B. Chavan, and
told newsmen on his departure,
"there are no misunderstandings
between Britain and India on de-
fense needs and there need never
be."
American sources added there
is no significant difference be-
tween India and the United States
on the extent of American arms.
aid, the assessment of the Red Chi:.
nese threat or India's determina-
tion to meet it rather than divert
its troops toward Pakistan.
ARRIVING
SUN DAY!

II

LONDON - The substantial
agreement reached last night be-
tween India, the United States,
and Britain on the question of
long-term military aid does not
alter the fact the there are stillj
some considerable differences be-t
tween India and the Allies.
He declared Britain must keep
its nuclear deterrent, not seek1
shelter behind the atomic power
of its friends.
"Without our nuclear shield, our1
defense is forever committed tof
our friends, and our counsels in
the alliance, which have for so1
long been those of moderation and
peace, would diminish greatly in
weight," he said in a statement.
Record of Responsibility
"I do not advocate the spread-
ing about of nuclear arms,. But
this country has an unequalled
record of responsibility in interna-
tional affairs. These deadly weap-
ons are safer in our hands than
in any other."
I Only Wednesday the 88-year-old
statesman announced he had de-
cided not to seek re-election to
the House of Commons. But now
he plunged into the political storm

11

11
_

The Michigan Union Cultural Affairs Committee
Presents:
TOMORROW
IPAUIL ROCHIE
English Poet and Novelist
in a reading of his poetry
and Greek play translations.
8:00 P.M.
Multipurpose Room-U.G.LI.
ADMISSION FREE

over British nuclear weapons with
all his old vigor.
Great Perils
But in his message to the annual
meeting of the Primrose League,
Churchill said the abandonment
of nuclear arms would condemn
Britain to "a course holding great
perils."
The Primrose League is an or-
ganization dedicated to Conserva-
tive Party ideal and a strong Brit-
ain.
In more than 60 years in the
House of Commons one thread-,

emi

.:.

Co ME

ro)

Crrukr

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Open House for new stu-
dents at Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Tuesday, 12:00 noon--Luncheon and Discus-
sion.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Donald Postemo, Minister
Washtenow at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Man-
day thru Saturday 10:00 oam. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Mondoy
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School,
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2.2756
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION

Park your Pen at
MORRILL'S on S. State
FOR THE BEST ONE-DAY FOUNTAIN PEN
REPAIR SERVICE IN TOWN
AND BE SURE TO CHECK OUR NEW
BARGAIN COUNTER WHILE YOU'RE IN.

the need for close British-Ameri-
can cooperation - had guide d
Churchill's policies.
American Might
Yet he made it clear he could
not contemplate a Britain depend-
ent on American military might.
He did this without mentioning
the United States by name.
Churchill warned that if Britain
gave up its nuclear deterrent,
"there will be no second chance."
He said nuclear policy "is one
of the great issues the country will
have to decide this year or next."

r

2r3A'!B rH

............
_
Y
,
°
:.,°
;,
; .
,'
;, '
..,.
..............
,
_ _.:,
t
i
I
{
:.
___
a

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
SUNDAY-
9:30 A. M. Worship Service & Communion
100:00 A.M. Bible Study
11:00 A.M. Worship Service
7:00 P.M. "The Second Vatican Council"-
Monsignor Bradley, St. Mary's Student
Chapel.
WEDNESDAY-
7:15 P.M. Vespers
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth.Ave.
Rev. Ernest'Kloudt, Pastor,
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
930 and 10:45 a.m. Chur&' School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Avenue
Erwin A. Goede, minister
Services and Church School 9:30 and 11:00
A.M. "Man: Incurably Religious"

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services 9:30 and 11:00 A.M.
"ThesBible Can Help You", Dr. Fred E.
Luchs.,
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40 A.M., Mrs. Luchs.
A.M.
Church School, crib-9th grade, 9:30 and 11 :00
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, 2-5189.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Worship Services at 9:45 and 11:15 with the
Rev. C. R. Fiege preaching. Holy Commun-
ion will be distributed jn the two services.
Bible Classes at 9:45 and 11:15 will discuss
the Biblical meaning of "Love."
Gamma Delta (International Association of Lu-
theran Students) fellowship supper at 6
p.m. Program at 6:45 is a ponel discussion,
"The Christian and Deatlh."
Wednesday Devotions at 10' p.m. with the Rev.
Carl Weiser delivering the meditation.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: ck Borckordt and Patricia Pickett
Stoheburner.
NO 2-3580
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
In the four remaining Sunday morning discus-
sion classes the material by Reinhold Nei-
buhr in the reflection book "The World
Crises and American Responsibility" will
be considered.
SUNDAY
9:45 A.M. Discussion Class, The first two
essays of Neibuhr's book "The Challenge of
of the World Crisis" and "America's Mar-

-

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT RELATIONS
SEMINAR
Co-sponsored by
USNSA COMMITTEE of SGC
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
MICHIGAN UNION
"INTERNATIONAL STUDENT POLITICS:
PRESENT AND FUTURE"
Participants:
CLAUS MADSEN-former president, Danish Student
Federation

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8.6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 A.M. and 11:15 A.M. Morning War-
ship. "Prayer is Power," sermon by Dr.
Ruper. This service is broadcast over WOIA
1290 AM, 102.9 FM, 11:15 a.m. and
12:15 a.m.)
10:15 A.M. Seminar, Pine Room. "Anglican
Prayer."
5:30 P.M. Student Cabinet, Pine Room.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Gordon J. Van Neylen will speak
on, "Thouahts on Science and the Chris-
tian Faith.''
TUESDAY
7:00 P.M. Class: "Evangelists for the Un-
dergrads." Camus, Sallinger, Golding, Becket,
Wesley Lounge.
8:30 P.M. Open House, Jean Robe's aport-
ment.

University of Michigan Friends of
The Student Non-Violent Coordinating
Committee
presents
TUC rncDmiAA C I 'CDC

306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Com,
9:00 A.M. Holy Com

munion.
munion and Sermon

GS

S

for Students.

I

I

i %Aprr% ircr\Av

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan